Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    Forum Regular Widowmaker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    95

    Does video cable length degrade a video signal?

    Hey, folks, sorry about all my annoying questions. I just have another in my never-ending series.

    I just got a front projector and have not ordered the extra-long component video cable for it yet. To tide me over, I borrowed a friend's 25 ft. S-video cable and when I plugged it up, I was amazed at the signal loss. Colors looked more monochromatic, images were fuzzier and the picture looked "foggier" than if I ran a 6 ft. S-video cable to the projector (I actually tested this, I dragged my DVD player over to the projector and plugged it up using the 6 ft. cable and the picture was noticeably better).

    I've read about signal loss and how you get more if the cable run is longer (especially video cables). The company I will order my component cable from carries different lines, some cables are labled as "low bandwidth" (cheaper) while others are "high bandwidth." Should I just bite the bullet and order the higher priced high bandwidth cable or does component video not have as much signal loss as S-video?

  2. #2
    Forum Regular
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    1,720
    Quote Originally Posted by Widowmaker
    Hey, folks, sorry about all my annoying questions. I just have another in my never-ending series.

    I just got a front projector and have not ordered the extra-long component video cable for it yet. To tide me over, I borrowed a friend's 25 ft. S-video cable and when I plugged it up, I was amazed at the signal loss. Colors looked more monochromatic, images were fuzzier and the picture looked "foggier" than if I ran a 6 ft. S-video cable to the projector (I actually tested this, I dragged my DVD player over to the projector and plugged it up using the 6 ft. cable and the picture was noticeably better).

    I've read about signal loss and how you get more if the cable run is longer (especially video cables). The company I will order my component cable from carries different lines, some cables are labled as "low bandwidth" (cheaper) while others are "high bandwidth." Should I just bite the bullet and order the higher priced high bandwidth cable or does component video not have as much signal loss as S-video?
    There is something wrong with that cable. 25ft should not make that kind of differences. If you have a meter, check resistance between pins without shorting the ends. It doesn't take much to mess up the soldering job as the pins are so close. Can you test another cable?
    mtrycrafts

  3. #3
    Forum Regular Woochifer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    6,883
    I found that the shielding on S-vid cables can vary from model to model. I use a 15-foot Monster 2 S-vid cable, yet the picture quality's noticeably better than the 6' OEM cables that I was using previously. With the OEM cables, there was noticeable ghosting with graphical images and the colors were not as vivid. I suspect it had to do with the connectors or the shielding because I lived in an area with a lot of RF interference. After swapping out the cables, the ghosting went away and I had to recalibrate the color levels on my TV. 25' is a long run, but for your situation I would guess that something having to do with the connector is more at fault. If that 25' cable was an OEM quality cable, then you should try a similar test with something better constructed like AR, basic Monster, or Radio Shack Gold Series cables. In my case, it didn't take much to notice an improvement.

  4. #4
    Forum Regular Widowmaker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    95
    Quote Originally Posted by Woochifer
    I found that the shielding on S-vid cables can vary from model to model. I use a 15-foot Monster 2 S-vid cable, yet the picture quality's noticeably better than the 6' OEM cables that I was using previously. With the OEM cables, there was noticeable ghosting with graphical images and the colors were not as vivid. I suspect it had to do with the connectors or the shielding because I lived in an area with a lot of RF interference. After swapping out the cables, the ghosting went away and I had to recalibrate the color levels on my TV. 25' is a long run, but for your situation I would guess that something having to do with the connector is more at fault. If that 25' cable was an OEM quality cable, then you should try a similar test with something better constructed like AR, basic Monster, or Radio Shack Gold Series cables. In my case, it didn't take much to notice an improvement.
    Hey, guys, thanks for the replies. Someone also told me that when using long-run cables, get a thicker one because they are shielded better. The borrowed cable that I'm using is pretty thin and Monster make an 8 meter s-video cable that's pretty thick for $50. I hate to buy it, since I consider Monster almost as big a rip-off as Bose but I guess I have no choice but to try it.

    BTW, when I do get around to ordering my component video cable, should I order to more expensive "high bandwidth" variety or should I just stick to a basic (cheaper) one?

  5. #5
    Forum Regular
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Posts
    553
    Quote Originally Posted by Widowmaker
    BTW, when I do get around to ordering my component video cable, should I order to more expensive "high bandwidth" variety or should I just stick to a basic (cheaper) one?
    No, no, no, no, no, and NO! To call a coaxial video cable "high bandwidth" is pure, unadulterated marketing bullsh*t. All that's necessary is to get a well-constructed cable with adequate shielding (IF you happen to live where RFI is a problem - most people don't).
    Such cable(s) are available at reasonable prices ... do NOT get suckered into buying an exotic cable with the promise that it will make a "night & day" difference in your picture quality ... it won't.

    Regarding your experience with the 25' S-video cable, I concur with everyone elses POV that it was somehow defective. The length of it was NOT the deciding factor, IMO. The degradation of video signals over long runs of cable is real, but 25' is NOT considered a "long run".

    Hope this helps you
    woodman

    I plan to live forever ..... so far, so good!
    Steven Wright

  6. #6
    Forum Regular Widowmaker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    95
    Quote Originally Posted by woodman
    No, no, no, no, no, and NO! To call a coaxial video cable "high bandwidth" is pure, unadulterated marketing bullsh*t. All that's necessary is to get a well-constructed cable with adequate shielding (IF you happen to live where RFI is a problem - most people don't).
    Such cable(s) are available at reasonable prices ... do NOT get suckered into buying an exotic cable with the promise that it will make a "night & day" difference in your picture quality ... it won't.

    Regarding your experience with the 25' S-video cable, I concur with everyone elses POV that it was somehow defective. The length of it was NOT the deciding factor, IMO. The degradation of video signals over long runs of cable is real, but 25' is NOT considered a "long run".

    Hope this helps you
    This was very helpful. Thanks for all the replies.

  7. #7
    Suspended Smokey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Ozarks
    Posts
    3,959
    Quote Originally Posted by Widowmaker
    BTW, when I do get around to ordering my component video cable, should I order to more expensive "high bandwidth" variety or should I just stick to a basic (cheaper) one?
    The problem with [IC] cables is that the longer it gets, the quality will matter more (such as shielding). Since you said the s-video you used is thin kind, I wouldn't be surprise to see video degradation for that length.

    But going with component connection, you can eliminate that problem since you can build your own cables, and it will be much cheaper than $50 and probably better.

    All you have to do is pick up three spool of pre assembled RG-59 Coax cables from radio shack (for bout $5 a piece), and terminate each end (you will need 6) with "F to RCA" adaptor at $2.99 a piece. This cable will eliminate your shielding and bandwidth problem, and will be much better than what you will find off the shelf-and probably cheaper

  8. #8
    ride a jet ski Tarheel_'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    661
    while searching for a 50' component cable, cablestogo.com seems very reasonable and well made. For 25' their cost is $27 plus shipping. Check it out...

    http://www.cablestogo.com/product.as...2010&sku=29053

  9. #9
    Forum Regular Widowmaker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    95
    Quote Originally Posted by Tarheel_
    while searching for a 50' component cable, cablestogo.com seems very reasonable and well made. For 25' their cost is $27 plus shipping. Check it out...

    http://www.cablestogo.com/product.as...2010&sku=29053
    Hey, Tarheel, thanks for the link, I was just about to drop $50 on a 25' cable and you jsut saved me some coin! Thanks a lot.

    BTW, I hope you didn't pick UNC to get past the Sweet Sixteen! ;p

  10. #10
    Forum Regular
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    36

    Component and Composite cables

    Is it true that instead of using a cable marketed as a "component cable" one could use standard RCA cables (Y, R, W?) Is there any difference between these cables? I think I've read here that they are the same, but my memory is sometimes fuzzy.

  11. #11
    Forum Regular Widowmaker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    95

    A quick update...

    Hey, folks, thanks for all the advice. I went to Best Buy (ugh!) and bought Monster's 8 m. V2 S-video cable and now I hate myself for it because Monster's usually a rip-off and I can't stand Best Buy.

    It actually worked, though, the picture on my projector is much better and I guess my friend's S-video cable had something wrong with it.

    Again, thanks everyone.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. The Great Cable Debate -- Reloaded
    By Monstrous Mike in forum Cables
    Replies: 32
    Last Post: 07-27-2009, 07:13 PM
  2. bi-wiring
    By sleeper_red in forum Cables
    Replies: 35
    Last Post: 12-19-2004, 02:47 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •