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  1. #76
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    There are single-piece inflatable deals shaped like cartoon starfish, or something, that were designed for us DJs. They're orange. You might want to try that, too. I use tuna fish cans (ashtrays will also work) and rubber bands, with big-celled bubble wrap under that. I also physically block sound with a barrier between the speakers and the decks.

  2. #77
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    There's good news and bad news here:

    The N 890 E is an elliptical stylus, so while still meant for the DJ industry, it would be a small step up from the stock spherical stylus that comes with the 980 cartridge. I'd suggest looking at the Stanton 881 replacement styli available from Jico or LP gear. Jico offers a replacement stylus with a Shibata tip stylus for the 881 for $87 USD plus shipping. LP Gear also offers a Shibata for $99.95, or a Hyper-Elliptical stylus for $59.99. Any of these options would likely be better performers than the N 890 E.

    Now, for those that would love to own an 881S but don't want to pay the inflated eBay prices: The Stanton 890 DJ cartridge is simply a 881S without the Stereohedron stylus. You can find them used, as I did, for relatively cheap. I got mine for $20, and use the Jico Shibata with it, and it sounds fantastic for the price!

    Quote Originally Posted by tizeta2
    Hi all!

    This is my first post here... I've found this thread looking for informations about my 881s. Nice to see I'm not alone and many other people still loves this cartidge!

    The one I own was bought new by my father in late '70s and, unfortunately, the stylus is broken. Some times ago I contacted the Stanton support and they said me to look for a N 890 E stylus. Is it a correct replacement?

    I'm not a DJ and I'm not interested in scratching... just to listen to vinyl discs as better as I can mantaining the original sound of my cartidge!

    Thank you in advance!
    Alex

    (... from Italy!)

  3. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by whell

    I'd suggest looking at the Stanton 881 replacement styli available from Jico or LP gear. Jico offers a replacement stylus with a Shibata tip stylus for the 881 for $87 USD plus shipping. LP Gear also offers a Shibata for $99.95, or a Hyper-Elliptical stylus for $59.99. Any of these options would likely be better performers than the N 890 E.
    Thank you for your suggestion!
    Yes... I think I'll go with a Shibata.
    Is there any difference between LP Gear and Jico stylus?

  4. #79
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    ... well, I was watching a new Stanton 881s (with original D81 stylus) on eBay but another bidder won.

    So I've ordered a shibata stylus from Jico.
    I'd get it within a week... I'll let you know!

  5. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by emaidel
    (regarding the Stanton 681 cartridges) The "E" originally stood for "elliptical." The use of the double, and then triple E's, only signified newer, and improved models, as does the "MKII". The "S" indicates "Stereohedron."
    Something I have wondered about ever since the 681s were Stanton's top cartridges:

    One of them, at least in its original form when first introduced, was physically different in the construction of its cantilever: the Stanton 681EE.

    All of the rest have the usual tubular aluminum cantilever which is flattened and closed at the stylus end, so there is a double-thickness of the aluminum where the hole is, for mounting the stylus tip or shank. The 681EE had a tubular aluminum cantilever which had, for want of a better term, an open end cut to a taper: the cantilever was tapered down but the tubular shape remained open, not flattened at the stylus end, in fact one could see through the cantilever from the stylus end, right through to the magnet end. The stylus tip mounted into only one thickness of aluminum. Instinctively one would think this a less sturdy design but perhaps it had its own advantages?

    When the 681EEE was introduced I noted that it seemed to have a slightly more forward high frequency response than the 681EE. My memory has faded over the years and the speakers I was using at the time are now gone, but I seem to recall that the 681EEE sounded like it had a peak in the high range where the 681EE sounded like it had a smoother response. I was wondering whether perhaps this was due to a slightly higher mass to the 681EEE cantilever. Over the years I've wound up with several original 681EEE styli but I only ever owned one 681EE; apparently the 681EE was produced for a much shorter time, perhaps being discontinued when the 681EEE was introduced, with subsequent availability possibly being dependent upon existing stock. Regardless, with the turntable/arm, amplification and loudspeakers I had at the time, I preferred the 681EE but when the 881S appeared, I changed over to that cartridge. My lone 681EE stylus has lain ignored, then forgotten ever since. For a while I thought I had lost it.

    Then I found my Stanton 681EE stylus, of course while looking for something else. Over many years I forgot that it was in a box for a 681EEE stylus. Taking the time to look at the item instead of the box, I spotted the tell-tale silver ellipse on the plastic grip, rather than the letters "EEE." Yes, the cantilever is open on the stylus end, and Yes, you can see right through it from one end to the other! Its construction does look quite fragile and the nude-mounted diamond is very tiny. I might just mount it up and see what I think of its sound now. It has probably been twenty years since I last listened to it.

    ANYWAY, does either of our two resident ex-Stanton engineers know about this particular cantilever construction in the 681EE, and why it was changed later?

    BACKGROUND: I've used Stantons ever since the 500E and kept up with their top-line products up to the 981 series. When I was in audio service and repair, I worked for in stores which were Stanton dealers. Currently my main cartridge is a Decca London...but as Ken Kessler once recommended, I keep a more conventional cartridge around, too: a Stanton 881S. For LP-to-CD conversions I use a 680SL (actually a D6800SL stylus in a 681EEE body). It tracks heavier than the 881S which can be desirable when dubbing less-than-pristine LPs; but, all by itself among the heavier-tracking Stanton 681/680 styli and their Pickering brethren, it has the Stereohedron tip.
    Last edited by GP49; 05-05-2009 at 03:41 PM.

  6. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by GP49
    ANYWAY, does either of our two resident ex-Stanton engineers know about this particular cantilever construction in the 681EE, and why it was changed later?

    .
    'Fraid not. The 681EEE was introduced in 1974, two years before I joined Pickering. It was actually a derivative of the Pickering XV/15-1200E, but with some noticeable improvements, mostly its ability to cope with sibilance which the 1200-E couldn't. Whether this had anything to do with the cantilever shape, is something I have no idea about. I purchased one for myself and liked it quite a bit, but greatly preferred the Pickering XSV/3000 and then the Stanton 881-S. My preference for them had little to do with the shape of the cantilever - I just felt that the two newer models sounded a whole helluva lot better.

  7. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by nfalbert
    Ed_In_Tx,

    I just tried a D4500Q stylus in an 881 body, and although the cantilever on my stylus seems to have settled to the point where the stylus guard grazes the record, it seems to sound pretty decent on a couple of classical LP's I tried it on.

    Neil
    I just received a NOS D4500Q stylus that's perfect! Took 34 days from New Zealand but I finally got it, and it's playing as I type. Only about 10 bucks more shipped than they cost new in the '70s so I think pretty good these days for a virgin Quadrahedral stylus. Came in the mail less than an hour ago so I am excited that it GOT here and the cantilever and suspension look perfect and it sounds excellent in the 881S body.

  8. #83
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    Hello,

    Rob Here.I'm new.I have a question for the Stanton Pickering guys.Would you sugest using a D 4500 Q for an XLZ cartridge? I noticed that the XLZ had a model and stylus that was a 4500 S.Are these similar?

    Rob

  9. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by tizeta2
    ... well, I was watching a new Stanton 881s (with original D81 stylus) on eBay but another bidder won.

    So I've ordered a shibata stylus from Jico.
    I'd get it within a week... I'll let you know!
    Good choice. I'm not sure who makes the styli for LP Gear. Some suggest that they are made by Jico, but I don't think so.

  10. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by ludwignut
    Hello,

    Rob Here.I'm new.I have a question for the Stanton Pickering guys.Would you sugest using a D 4500 Q for an XLZ cartridge? I noticed that the XLZ had a model and stylus that was a 4500 S.Are these similar?

    Rob
    I can't be of much help to you. The XLZ model was, I believe, one of either the "high impedance" or "low impedance" cartrdiges Stanton (and Pickering) introduced in the early 80's as an unsuccessful bid to gain a foothold amongst the moving coil cartridge fans. I know I had one of them (perhaps the XLZ, if it was the one that didn't require a step up transformer) and didn't care much for it at all, feeling it was overly bright and brittle sounding. I just don't know if it was a moving magnet, or moving iron design.

  11. #86
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    Here is some information on the XLZ Cartridge.It is the low impedance variety.

    http://www.pickeringuk.com/XLZ7500.html

    Rob

  12. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by whell
    Good choice. I'm not sure who makes the styli for LP Gear. Some suggest that they are made by Jico, but I don't think so.
    The Shibata stylus is here!
    Great service and very good manufacture.

    It sounds good, highs are very clear but my Stanton 680EL MK2 seems to produce a more full sound on mid and low range. The 881s with Shibata stylus is quite "cold"... is it possible?

  13. #88
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    People do say the moving iron type cartridges (which would be the 681) sound more "warm".

    It is also possible that yours needs a little break-in time to smooth out a bit. Let a dozen or so LP's play under it, and see if the sound becomes a little more to your liking.

    Dave O.

  14. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by daveobieone
    People do say the moving iron type cartridges (which would be the 681) sound more "warm".

    It is also possible that yours needs a little break-in time to smooth out a bit. Let a dozen or so LP's play under it, and see if the sound becomes a little more to your liking.

    Dave O.
    Hello Dave!

    The shibata is playing for 10 hours and the sound is a bit better now.
    But if I replace it with my "old" 680EL, this one will offer a full sound I can't listen to with the 881s and shibata.

    In addition the 881s with shibata stylus amplifies dust and vinyl defects.

    It's quite frustrating...

    Just another question: what are differences between a 681 cartidge and my 680 MkII with D680EL MkII stylus?

    Thanks!

  15. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by tizeta2
    The Shibata stylus is here!
    Great service and very good manufacture.

    It sounds good, highs are very clear but my Stanton 680EL MK2 seems to produce a more full sound on mid and low range. The 881s with Shibata stylus is quite "cold"... is it possible?
    Its very possible, as mine was this way as well. I say "was this way" because it the stylus does seem to benefit immensely from a prolonged break in period. The sonic differences between new and about 20 - 30 hours of playing time were significant in my experience.

  16. #91
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    As nearly as I can tell, the 681 and 680 cartridge bodies are the same. The styli that come with the 680 series seem better suited to DJ use, and the 681 was clearly more for Hi-Fi. It is possible that the 681 bodies had tighter specs however...as they were usually higher priced.

    Do not confuse the 680/681 with the 881 however. The 680/681 being moving iron, and the 881 is moving magnet. They may look the same, but they are not interchangeable.

    I am surprised that the new stylus picks up a lot more noise however. Line-contact type styli should generally be more quiet...depending on the record of couse. Perhaps it's just because it's brighter (has a stronger high-end) than the 681?

    In my experience, most original factory Stanton styli didn't benifit much from break-in time. Aftermarket may be a MUCH different story however. My Grado products needed considerable break-in time.

  17. #92
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    ... just got an original D81S!!!
    I'll let you know something as soon as possible...

  18. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by daveobieone
    As nearly as I can tell, the 681 and 680 cartridge bodies are the same. The styli that come with the 680 series seem better suited to DJ use, and the 681 was clearly more for Hi-Fi. It is possible that the 681 bodies had tighter specs however...as they were usually higher priced.
    They bodies are the same. The only difference is that the 681 cartridges were "calibrated", and performance specifications were included with each new cartridge sold, given that the 681 series was targeted at the professional market. The extra effort to provide the performance specs for each cartridge sold was the prime differentiator for pricing, along with, I believe, the more limited production runs for some of the professional styli versus the "consumer - grade" styli available for the 680 series.

  19. #94
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    Quote Originally Posted by tizeta2
    ... just got an original D81S!!!
    I'll let you know something as soon as possible...
    Ah, you're killin' me!

  20. #95
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    Hello,

    I'm wondering if I could ask you the best way to proceed with an old XSV-3000 cartridge that has no stylus...

    It got broken somehow around 1980 and I've had the cart stored in its orig box since then. I've seen some forum posts suggesting a Stanton 881s stylus might work but also some recommending the D-3000 for the Stanton...

    I'd be very grateful if somone could suggest a reasonably affordable option so I can use this great cartridge I've kept for so many years.

    After scrolling through these posts I'm also wondering if I need to have only an orig D-3000 stylus with that fine wire attached...(?)

    Thanks from New Zealand.

    Cheers Sam

  21. #96
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    Quote Originally Posted by nfalbert
    Yes, my previous comment had the the LP gear stylus in mind as poosibly being better
    than the Stanton stylus for their DJ model

    However, I personally have had no experience with these, which are probably
    made made a 3rd party manufacturer, since, to my knowledge, Stanton is no longer making
    replacements. It appears to have a cantilever closer to the original ad than one in the eBay ad.


    Recommendations as such are very difficult task. I had suggested something like the LP gear D81 because, the Stanton stylus for the 890 DJ cartridge appeared to have a tracking
    range up to 5 grams, a force which would unquestionably bottom out an original 881
    which tracked between -1-1/2 grams

    What the manufacturers of these replacements may have done is to create a product
    that will cause the cartridge to resume functioning if purchased, which may be adaquate
    for some buyers. Unscrewing the original cartridge body from the tone arm would be avoided. The crimp on the LP Gear stylus tube appears to be different than the original 881S which used a suspension for which I am named as the inventor with Stanton
    being the owner. Perhaps the LP Gear D81 is slightly different construction than that of the original, such as the cantilever assembly being self contained and merely having to be inserted into the originally size stylus housing. This type of construction would make
    it easier for a replacement stylus manufacturer to use a few standard cantilever, magnet and suspension assemblies and then fit them into a housing having the original manufactures dimensions. The result could still be good, depending how critical
    your were going to be. Depending on your budget, and how often you planned to use
    the stylus, there seems to be an elliptical version at half the price. Elliptical
    stylus tips are inexpensive to make, so it would not be unreasonable to believe that
    this were the only difference, and since there are a number of unknowns, the risk factor is reduced.

    The item on EBay you pointed out appears to have a thicker cantilever than the LP Gear
    Unit, and might be just be a 681 type cantilever with a rod magnet inserted in the back.

    I hope that helps, at least a little. Recommendations for styli in the 21st century is
    as much an archeological project as it is scientific.

    Here is the patent

    http://www.google.com/patents?vid=USPAT4140321

    Rob

  22. #97
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    Quote Originally Posted by smersh
    Hello,

    I'm wondering if I could ask you the best way to proceed with an old XSV-3000 cartridge that has no stylus...


    Thanks from New Zealand.

    Cheers Sam
    Since you are in NZ have you tried styli.co.nz ? I recently bought a D4500Q NOS stylus from them and since you are there would probaby go a whole lot faster! (34 days for me to get it) I see they have an original D2000Q they say works with a XSV-3000 in the description, but is expensive. A D4500Q at half the price would work with your 3000 body, I am using the D4500Q in a Stanton 881S body which is very similar to the 3000 body, and it sounds very nice. No affiliation with styli.co.nz btw.

  23. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ed_in_Tx
    Since you are in NZ have you tried styli.co.nz ? I recently bought a D4500Q NOS stylus from them and since you are there would probaby go a whole lot faster! (34 days for me to get it) I see they have an original D2000Q they say works with a XSV-3000 in the description, but is expensive. A D4500Q at half the price would work with your 3000 body, I am using the D4500Q in a Stanton 881S body which is very similar to the 3000 body, and it sounds very nice. No affiliation with styli.co.nz btw.

    Hi, thanks for the reply. I looked at their site but they seem really expensive and they don't seem to have an exact match; perhaps one of the ex-Pickering guys could tell me if a D2000 should replace a D3000...?

    However I think I could get one cheaper overseas than buy from this local crowd. Delivery time is no problem as this cart has been waiting 29 years for a replacement...
    I'd hate to splash out top dollar and then find this cart doesn't work any more.

    Thanks again though; I'll keep looking for now.

    Cheers Sam

  24. #99
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    Quote Originally Posted by smersh
    perhaps one of the ex-Pickering guys could tell me if a D2000 should replace a D3000...?
    I did not try the D4500Q stylus in the 881S body until I got the "blessing" first from the ex-Pickering-Stanton guys, if you go back a few pages in this thread. Didn't want to screw anything up. Glad I asked! I have a little-used XUV-4500Q since the quad-CD-4 days, and had thought about trying its stylus in the Stanton body, but never knew whether it was compatible. Tried it after getting the "OK" and it works great, super detailed sound, then I bought a NOS stylus from NZ so I would have two. Finding a genuine Pickering D4500Q quadrahedral stylus for about what they cost new in 1975 was great. Good luck in your quest!
    Last edited by Ed_in_Tx; 05-31-2009 at 04:14 PM.

  25. #100
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    As both an ex Pickering and ex Stanton "guy," I'd strongly recommend against the D-2000. It is a replacement for a decidedly inferior cartridge than the XSV-3000. I'd suggest instead looking for a D-81S replacement (for the Stanton 881-S), which several sites offer, though most are not factory originals, but knock-offs. Still, at least according to the comments from a few that have used them, they seem to be OK. The XSV-3000 and 881-S cartridges are so similar, as to be considered almost identical.

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