Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 44
  1. #1
    Vinyl Fundamentalist Forums Moderator poppachubby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Analog Synagogue
    Posts
    4,363

    Poppachubby's Rabbithole

    Hello gang!

    It seems I am never here anymore. Life (the one without a keyboard) is keeping me VERY busy with 3 kids under the age of 5, a wife, a full time job and all that these things entail.

    I also had spent quite a bit of time focusing on my system. The result was exactly what I set out to create, imagine that?!? Now I only look forward to listening to tunes rather than endlessly tinkering, auditioning and researching. It's actually a very nice place to be.



    My music collection has expanded wildly. It's a combination of digital and vinyl. The convenience of digital was the initial attraction, but I am quite enjoying it as a format. Frankly a server based front end into some tubes and revealing speakers has much appeal.

    Soooo, I will try to arrive at a point. I am ever more anxious to discuss music these days. I have considered a blog but I would be a needle in a haystack. Perhaps I still may explore that option, but I thought I would start this thread instead. It will bring me onto the site more often and allow me to share what I am diggin.



    Self indulgent? Totally. Will anybody even care? Probably not, I have no illusions. My main focus for the last year has been 95% jazz which I know will eliminate alot of interest. Oh well, for those of you who may want to chat, it just may be fun.



    I have done ALOT of listening and researching this great music we call Jazz. I feel like I have alot of great stuff to share which some people may never know. So here I go...

  2. #2
    Super Moderator Site Moderator JohnMichael's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Central Ohio
    Posts
    6,307
    I would love to learn more about jazz. What I would appreciate would be a top twenty must haves of jazz. I have some Mingus, Coltrane, Ellington, Oscar Peterson and Oliver Nelson but it is time to spread my wings. I also love many of the jazz vocalists. Educate me jazzman. Oh the jazz selection in Paris was incredible. I could have shopped for hours.
    JohnMichael
    Vinyl Rega Planar 2, Incognito rewire, Deepgroove subplatter, ceramic bearing, Michell Technoweight, Rega 24V motor, TTPSU, FunkFirm Achroplat platter, Michael Lim top and bottom braces, 2 Rega feet and one RDC cones. Grado Sonata, Moon 110 LP phono.
    Digital
    Sony SCD-XA5400ES SACD/cd SID mat, Marantz SA 8001
    Int. Amp Krell S-300i
    Speaker
    Monitor Audio RS6
    Cables
    AQ SPKR and AQ XLR and IC

  3. #3
    Vinyl Fundamentalist Forums Moderator poppachubby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Analog Synagogue
    Posts
    4,363

    Tough Tenors...

    The last 3 weeks or so I have been totally enamored with the saxophone. Alto, tenor...don't matter. I'm more concerned with the tone and sound. It's that gruff and tough rumble, those soulful wails and the rhythm laiden honks. This style has an immediate street sensibility about it. It feels raw and full of powerful emotion, yet knows when to apply dynamics and lay back.

    Can I summarise for you? I am talking about what is popularily known as Soul Jazz. During the 50's it hadn't been awarded it's genre quite yet, and bop/hard bop was very much at the forefront. But there was a definite movement to incorporate the essence of the blues and newly minted R and B into jazz. Also, sax players who were inspired by Lester Young, Ben Webster and Coleman Hawkins were looking for an outlet to convey this very stylistic approach.

    The result was Soul Jazz, but let's not dwell on the contrived name, but rather the wonderful music which all came together naturally. The big sax names of this period include Earl Bostic, Illinois Jacquet, Gene Ammons, Cannonball Adderly, Eddie Lockjaw Davis, Arnett Cobb, Houston Person, Red Holloway, Lou Donaldson and frankly, too many more to name here.

    I have listened to a heap of sides from all of these artists and would like to share some of the best, at least to my ears.

    Getting the most spins in the last few days...

    Illinois Jacquet - Bottoms Up!



    This is an absolute masterpiece. Nothing but joyous fun and ultra soulful funkiness. The backing band give Jacquet tons of room and he takes full advantage. This is the kind of jazz more people need to discover, thus removing the mystery which eludes so many. This band is 100% accesible and may even have you up and at em!



    Eddie 'Lockjaw' Davis and Shirley Scott - The Complete Cookbook Sessions



    A collection of 5 classic albums. Cookbook Vol. 1 - 3, Smokin and Jaws, all released under Davis' name. This music comes from a merging of Davis and the Shirley Scott Trio, personally one of my all time favorites. With George Duvivier on bass and Arthur Edgehill on drums, there was no end to the groovin and swingin that this group could accomplish. This set documents some of the best. The Scott Trio worked with alot of other great frontmen, notably Stanley Turrentine (Shirley Scotts ex husband), but nothing approaches the output of this group IMO.

    A great way to have several super fun and groovin albums, but more importantly, to hear Jaws lay it down!



    Arnett Cobb - More Party Time!




    Awww man, what can I say that the titles doesn't imply?!? A real burner this one.


    Anyhow, I'll be back. I'm hopin some discussion will come about, look forward to it.

  4. #4
    Vinyl Fundamentalist Forums Moderator poppachubby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Analog Synagogue
    Posts
    4,363

    Lists...

    Quote Originally Posted by JohnMichael View Post
    I would love to learn more about jazz. What I would appreciate would be a top twenty must haves of jazz. I have some Mingus, Coltrane, Ellington, Oscar Peterson and Oliver Nelson but it is time to spread my wings. I also love many of the jazz vocalists. Educate me jazzman. Oh the jazz selection in Paris was incredible. I could have shopped for hours.
    Lists are always tough. Tel me some specific things you like and dont like. For example, which instruments do you favour, which drive you nuts if any? Do you enjoy the really intense and intricate avante garde or do you prefer something more bluesy and familiar perhaps?

    The "mode" I am in right now is a great one John. Nothing but full on, hard swing with superb upbeat feel. Basically this is what jazz should have more of...fun!! Actually I think alot of artists set out to convey that, but it doesn't translate easily sometimes.

    Oh I wish I had sent it, I had a CD set up for you. Perhaps I will send it anyhow. You will love it.

    Anyhow I have to sleep for a bit as I am on midnight shift. Answer some of my questions and hopefully some others will chime in as well. I am not trying to be Yoda here, just a guy havin fun listening to my tunes.

  5. #5
    Big science. Hallelujah. noddin0ff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    X
    Posts
    2,286
    Excellent idea, Pops. And, I'm glad you chose to stay here and start a thread. I'll be frequenting it for sure. I'd love to learn more about the people and the sub-genres. I keep thinking that if I only had the top 1% of everything you listen too I'd be set for jazz for a long time -- never forever :-)

    Soul jazz sounds like a great start. Coltrane so dominated my start into sax oriented jazz it's taken me a long time to realize there was more fun to be had. Don't know where they sit with regards to 'soul jazz' but Sonny Rollins and Stanley Turrentine as well as Cannonball Adderly are about as deep as I've explored.

    Anyway, I welcome an opportunity to learn and am eager for some context for whatever you're finding interesting in jazz.
    TCA ATT GGA

  6. #6
    Forum Regular nobody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    1,964
    Our tastes in jazz have coincided enough so far that I'll definitely be checking out this thread, even if there is no way I'll be able to keep up and check it all out. But this will be a spot for me to come get ideas for things to try out when I'm looking for some new jazz.

    Oh...and speaking of jazz and being busy...I swear I really am gonna get you a couple thing sin the mail...damn life keeping me all kinds of crazy busy. Well busy then hungover and not leaving the house until the post office is closed, but still.

  7. #7
    Vinyl Fundamentalist Forums Moderator poppachubby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Analog Synagogue
    Posts
    4,363
    Oh man, you guys don't know how happy I am to have some response. I really thought I would be goin it alone, and that would have been fine really, but much more fun this way. I hope you guys contribute as well and realise that I will be posting whatever I am listening too, so occasionally something other than jazz.



    Quote Originally Posted by noddin0ff View Post
    Excellent idea, Pops. And, I'm glad you chose to stay here and start a thread. I'll be frequenting it for sure. I'd love to learn more about the people and the sub-genres. I keep thinking that if I only had the top 1% of everything you listen too I'd be set for jazz for a long time -- never forever :-)

    Soul jazz sounds like a great start. Coltrane so dominated my start into sax oriented jazz it's taken me a long time to realize there was more fun to be had. Don't know where they sit with regards to 'soul jazz' but Sonny Rollins and Stanley Turrentine as well as Cannonball Adderly are about as deep as I've explored.

    Anyway, I welcome an opportunity to learn and am eager for some context for whatever you're finding interesting in jazz.
    It's funny that you should mention Cannonball and The Sugar Man. They both were strong contributors to the whole soul jazz/tough tenor scene. Cannonball, now infamously, was opposed to the whole sub genre of soul jazz as he didn't like being pigeon-holed. It was the labels who really dug in to promote the music as soul jazz.

    I could actually use some education when it comes to Cannonball. I am sorely missing some "must haves" with his name of them. Now as for Turrentine, I am flush with titles.

    Quote Originally Posted by nobody View Post
    Our tastes in jazz have coincided enough so far that I'll definitely be checking out this thread, even if there is no way I'll be able to keep up and check it all out. But this will be a spot for me to come get ideas for things to try out when I'm looking for some new jazz.

    Oh...and speaking of jazz and being busy...I swear I really am gonna get you a couple thing sin the mail...damn life keeping me all kinds of crazy busy. Well busy then hungover and not leaving the house until the post office is closed, but still.
    Don't sweat it Davey because it's usually me in the busy seat. I just sent john Micheal a package which sat around for the better part of a year. Pathetic really, but such is life, the days can fly by.

  8. #8
    Vinyl Fundamentalist Forums Moderator poppachubby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Analog Synagogue
    Posts
    4,363

    Of Groups Known...and Unknown.

    You know, the one thing I would like to impart, if anything, from this thread is to enlighten people to some lesser known groups. Now when I say group, I am not taking about some big shot player with a revolving door of sidemen. No I am taking about a group more in the rock sense, in which the majority of members remain the same. Another defining quality IMO is that they work outside of the studio together, not just some studio grouping.

    Jazz is a funny beast when it comes to groups, even the greatest and brightest don't last long. I'm reminded of the great quintets of Miles Davis and Coltrane's legendary quartet. The music is really an individual sport when it comes right down to it. Through the years however, there have been some monstrous groups which are only really known to the enthusiast.

    Since I am in the realm of soul jazz, and Noddinoff is a Turrentine fan, I will start with a couple groups infact. Firstly...



    Stanley Turrentine - tenor saxophone
    Tommy Turrentine - trumpet
    Horace Parlan - piano
    George Tucker - bass
    Al Harewood - drums

    I would say that this gang were billed mostly under Horace Parlan's name, but occasionally under Turrentine as well. As a quintet, they were fantastic. The Turrentine brothers appeared together on several other albums, one of my faves being Max Roach's Parisian Sketches.

    Frankly, I am a big Tommy Turrentine fan. He's possibly one of the most underrated trumpeters of this era. Most certainly the most under recorded. He only had one album to his name and appeared on a pittance of side dates when compared to his contemporaries. Tommy was a live player first and foremost.

    Anyhow this group could really do it all, from uptempo down to syrupy ballads, all drenched in a bluesy feel. I think all in all these guys played together for a couple years, and then went their seperate ways.

  9. #9
    Vinyl Fundamentalist Forums Moderator poppachubby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Analog Synagogue
    Posts
    4,363
    Now for another group which I am only too happy to share. The Gigi Gryce quintet. Now Gryce fronted many quintets during his years as a top composer and player, it was his preferred combo. But nothing approaches what happened in 1960, when his quintet managed to stabilize and after tireless touring and live dates, create some timeless albums. Infact these albums were special not just for thier content, but the reason of being the last he would ever put out. Talk about going out with a bang!



    Richard Williams (t),
    Gigi Gryce (as),
    Richard Wyands (p),
    Julian Euell / Reggie Workman (b),
    Mickey Roker (d)

    All of these were recorded in 1960 and with Prestige, the exception being Reminiscin on Mercury. There's a consistency and quality throughout. This band could swing really hard and yet, they could apply a real modern edge. "The New Thing" as it was being called back then. Gryce was a phenomenal arranger and composer who's services were often sought after. Those skills weigh heavy on these albums and help to set them apart, giving the group a distinction all their own.

    Honorable mention should go out to Richard Williams. Much like Tommy Turrentine, this cat was waaaay underrated. He could grab your attention in 2 or 3 notes, a tonal genius especially in the freak register (high range). Curiously, and again like Tommy, only one album ever had Williams name at the top. Nat Hentoff had the good sense to get him in the studio, using the Candid imprint. I would highly suggest that album if you can get a copy.

    Of these 4, Saying Somethin' is required listening. Start to finish this quintet will have you.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Now that's my favorite Gryce group, but many would say that the Gigi Gryce/Donald Byrd Jazz Lab were the shiznit. Now we trot back to an earlier stage in Gryce's career, 1957.

    While short lived, the albums these guys put out are still relevant today. This band worked and recorded together, their goal at the time was to give bebop a new style. Inevitably, they managed to do that with the Jazz Lab, but it's impact was mostly at a musician's level.




    Donald Byrd (tp),
    Gigi Gryce (as),
    Hank Jones / Wade Legge (p),
    Paul Chambers / Wendell Marshall (b),
    Art Taylor (d).

    The Jazz Lab's discography can be a tad tricky to navigate. Frankly, I highly suggest the complete set from Fresh Sound. They give it the real treatment, worth every penny indeed. If not, I Iisted their 2 most important sides.

    I found listening to the Lab helped me to understand Donald Byrd's direction alot better. After this he formed a wonderful quintet with Pepper Adams (I'll get to that later). I think the largest contribution these guys made was to show everyone how to incorporate modern ideas with existing/older ones.

  10. #10
    ride a jet ski Tarheel_'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    661
    Great thread! Repeat viewer here for sure.

    My wife and I just finished our family room and after dinner each night it becomes our listening room. We enjoy both Jazz and Smooth Jazz via Directv music channels. Love the sax and trumpet mainly.

    Can't wait to read more and learn about some new music!

  11. #11
    Vinyl Fundamentalist Forums Moderator poppachubby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Analog Synagogue
    Posts
    4,363

    Recent listening...

    Ike Quebec - The Complete Blue Note 45 Sessions
    Blue Note, 1962

    Ike Quebec (tenor saxophone);
    Willie Jones, Skeeter Best (guitar);
    Milt Hinton, Sam Jones, Sonny Wellesley (double bass);
    Edwin Swanston, Earl Van Dyke, Sir Charles Thompson (organ); J.C. Heard, Les Jenkins, Wilbert G.T. Hogan (drums).




    Jimmy Forrest - All The Gin Is Gone
    Delmark, 1959

    Jimmy Forrest (tenor saxophone);
    Harold Mabern (piano);
    Grant Green (guitar);
    Gene Ramey (bass);
    Elvin Jones (drums).




    Julian Priester - Keep Swingin'
    Riverside, 1960

    Julian Priester – trombone
    Jimmy Heath – tenor sax
    Tommy Flanagan – piano
    Sam Jones – bass
    Elvin Jones – drums


  12. #12
    Forum Regular nobody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    1,964
    Listening to Turrentine right now myself...The Complete Blue Hour Sessions, great bluesy laid back jazz.


    I can't exactly say if that Ike Quebec turned up on dropbox I'd be disappointed.
    Last edited by nobody; 09-28-2011 at 07:58 AM.

  13. #13
    Big science. Hallelujah. noddin0ff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    X
    Posts
    2,286
    Quote Originally Posted by poppachubby View Post
    Since I am in the realm of soul jazz, and Noddinoff is a Turrentine fan, I will start with a couple groups infact. Firstly...

    Stanley Turrentine - tenor saxophone
    Tommy Turrentine - trumpet
    Horace Parlan - piano
    George Tucker - bass
    Al Harewood - drums

    I would say that this gang were billed mostly under Horace Parlan's name, but occasionally under Turrentine as well. As a quintet, they were fantastic. The Turrentine brothers appeared together on several other albums, one of my faves being Max Roach's Parisian Sketches.
    Oh man... I can feel my wallet getting thinner already. I hadn't really picked up on Horace but after Wiki I see he's the fingers on two fantastic Mingus albums as well (Ah Um, and Blues and Roots). Gonna have to pick one (or more) of those up.
    TCA ATT GGA

  14. #14
    Shostakovich fan Feanor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    London, Ontario
    Posts
    8,127
    I certainly do like some Jazz. To this point, though, my interest has be pretty focused on a few styles, notably on Hard Bop and Modal; I haven't found much vocal Jazz that I care about.

    Perhaps my interest will broaden in the future, who knows? Meanwhile my entire collection, (all CD), is this ...

    artistalbum
    Art Blakey & The Jazz MessengersMoanin'
    Art PepperArt Pepper+Eleven
    Bill EvansSunday At The Village Vanguard
    Bill Evans TrioWaltz For Debby [Live]
    Cannonball AdderleySomethin' Else
    Charles MingusMingus Ah Um
    Charles MingusPithecanthropus Erectus
    Clifford BrownThe Best Of Clifford Brown: The Blue Note Years
    Dave Brubeck QuartetTime Out
    Freddie HubbardBreaking Point
    Freddie HubbardFreddie Hubbard: The Artist Selects
    Freddie HubbardReady For Freddie
    Art Blakey & The Jazz MessengersFreddie Hubbard: The Artist Selects
    Herbie HancockEmpyrean Isles
    Herbie HancockMaiden Voyage
    Jackie McLeanDestination Out
    Joe HendersonPage One
    John ColtraneBlue Train
    John ColtraneGiant Steps
    John ColtraneMy Favorite Things
    Joshua RedmanWish
    Lee MorganThe Best Of Lee Morgan [Bonus Tracks]
    Lou DonaldsonBlues Walk
    Miles DavisBirth Of The Cool
    Miles DavisB!tches Brew
    The Miles Davis QuintetCookin' With The Miles Davis Quintet
    Miles DavisKind Of Blue
    The Miles Davis QuintetMiles Smiles
    Miles DavisNefertiti
    Miles Davis'Round About Midnight (Remaster)
    Modern Jazz QuartetDjango
    Ornette ColemanThe Shape Of Jazz To Come
    Rahsaan Roland KirkBright Moments
    Sam RiversContours
    Sonny RollinsA Night at the Village Vanguard
    Sonny RollinsSaxophone Colossus
    Sonny RollinsWay Out West
    Sonny SharrockAsk The Ages
    Thelonious MonkBrilliant Corners
    Thelonious MonkThelonious Monk With John Coltrane
    Vince Guaraldi TrioJazz Impressions Of Black Orpheus (DCC)
    Wayne ShorterSpeak No Evil
    Wynton MarsalisBlack Codes (From The Underground)

  15. #15
    Big science. Hallelujah. noddin0ff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    X
    Posts
    2,286
    Only a few days and I’m already way behind on keeping up with the goodness here. Referring back to Cannonball Adderley. I only have a hand full of albums. However, for those looking for jazz essential albums I offer up

    Cannonball Adderley: Somethin’ Else


    This album came out in 1958 and includes Miles Davis on trumpet; one year later Adderley showed up on Miles’ Kind of Blue.

    Then for my other fave
    Cannonball Adderly: Dizzy’s Business


    From 1963. Where Somethin’ Else is cool, Dizzy’s Business sizzles (as you might expect in a tribute to Dizzy). This is a terrific set of live recordings. If you’ve heard the standard Autumn Leaves played a bazillion times too many, the track here might rekindle your interest. If you haven't, then see above. There’s some great bits with Yusef Lateef on oboe and flute (Jive Samba), and swingin’ piano…its all good.

    Dropboxed for limited time only, ALE.
    Last edited by noddin0ff; 09-28-2011 at 11:24 AM.
    TCA ATT GGA

  16. #16
    Forum Regular MindGoneHaywire's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Manhattan
    Posts
    1,125
    Just skimmed the thread; I will have to return to it. Just two things...when I think soul jazz the first two guys that come to mind for me personally are Grant Green & Jimmy Smith. I'm not even sure these are correct in terms of subgenre classification but that's what I think when I hear records like Grantstand, Matador, The Sermon, Chicken Shack, etc.

    My favorites are Miles up to about E.S.P. and Billie Holiday, particularly on Decca & Verve. Many more, of course, but I'll have to get to that later. Oh, yeah. Chet Baker.

    The Something Else album, as a side note, is considered by quite a few to actually be a Miles-led session that was issued in Adderley's name. Miles' band was in a transitional period and he was working on other projects, so there was an inability to put something out on a label like Blue Note because of his contractual obligations to Columbia, with whom he hadn't been affiliated all that long at that point. When he signed it was a bit complicated to begin with because there was the matter of the Cookin'/Steamin'/Relaxin'/Workin' recs, plus after Round About Midnight he was doing stuff with Gil Evans like Miles Up and Porgy & Bess (and Sketches of Spain not long afterward) that took time away from more traditional dates. So between that & the upheaval in the band (Coltrane was obviously the most difficult departure to deal with) there was only Milestones & Kind Of Blue prior to 1962's Someday My Prince Will Come. Then came the 2nd Quintet, but that wasn't solidified until years after this incredibly prolific period in the mid/late 50s. The Carnegie Hall live album is a mixed bag, and the '58 Sessions live stuff (which is terrific) didn't come out until years later. Miles thought the bossa nova album was botched. So it does kind of make sense that he wanted to put together another record in the vein of the 4 Prestige recs from just before he signed with Columbia.

    I think he may have denied that this was the case, but that would make sense if it was a matter of contractual obligations, after all. But with the exception of Kind Of Blue, Something Else is generally rated higher than most of Miles' stuff for the better part of a decade.

    I don't like others.

  17. #17
    Vinyl Fundamentalist Forums Moderator poppachubby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Analog Synagogue
    Posts
    4,363
    Quote Originally Posted by MindGoneHaywire View Post
    Just skimmed the thread; I will have to return to it. Just two things...when I think soul jazz the first two guys that come to mind for me personally are Grant Green & Jimmy Smith. I'm not even sure these are correct in terms of subgenre classification but that's what I think when I hear records like Grantstand, Matador, The Sermon, Chicken Shack, etc.
    Yes those two are soul jazz giants, although Grant Green had much more to offer IMO. Most jazz from that era which featured an organ and guitar would likely be of the soul jazz ilk.

    Quote Originally Posted by mindgonehaywire
    The Something Else album, as a side note, is considered by quite a few to actually be a Miles-led session that was issued in Adderley's name. Miles' band was in a transitional period and he was working on other projects, so there was an inability to put something out on a label like Blue Note because of his contractual obligations to Columbia, with whom he hadn't been affiliated all that long at that point.
    Now you could be totally right about this because I don't really know. I think if there was contractual issues, he would not have been allowed to appear at all. This happened ALL the time, and still does today. The common solution was and is for guys to use an alias. So I think he probably had permission for the session.

    During the 80's at the height of Wynton Marsalis' reign, members of his band began recording solo in Europe for the Novus label. Marsalis was not allowed to record outside of the Columbia umbrella, but he went anyhow and appeared on Hernin Riley's first album, and a couple others which I have forgotten. I forget the alias he used, but that's how he got it done.

    Miles imparted himself heavily on that album, so it's hard to imagine that Cannonball is the leader. Hey it's Miles frickin Davis, it's doubtful that he's just gonna be lampin while others tell him how or what to play. Considering that he was the biggest artist in the world at that time, Cannonball probably took his cues from him, rather than the other way around.

    Who knows really. This is the only Cannonball album I have.

  18. #18
    Vinyl Fundamentalist Forums Moderator poppachubby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Analog Synagogue
    Posts
    4,363
    Quote Originally Posted by noddin0ff View Post
    Oh man... I can feel my wallet getting thinner already. I hadn't really picked up on Horace but after Wiki I see he's the fingers on two fantastic Mingus albums as well (Ah Um, and Blues and Roots). Gonna have to pick one (or more) of those up.
    Parlan had a storied career, he played with the best of em. I really enjoy Up and Down and Happy Frame Of Mind as well, keep your eyes out for those.

  19. #19
    Vinyl Fundamentalist Forums Moderator poppachubby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Analog Synagogue
    Posts
    4,363
    Quote Originally Posted by nobody View Post
    Listening to Turrentine right now myself...The Complete Blue Hour Sessions, great bluesy laid back jazz.


    I can't exactly say if that Ike Quebec turned up on dropbox I'd be disappointed.
    Gimma a couple of days, I am in the midst of working. No sweat, no human being should be without it.


    Quote Originally Posted by feanor
    I certainly do like some Jazz. To this point, though, my interest has be pretty focused on a few styles, notably on Hard Bop and Modal; I haven't found much vocal Jazz that I care about.

    Perhaps my interest will broaden in the future, who knows?
    I am surprised, I thought you didn't like jazz? That's a really solid collection Bill, lots of classics. I will make a few copies for you, we can listen to them on the way to the show!

  20. #20
    Vinyl Fundamentalist Forums Moderator poppachubby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Analog Synagogue
    Posts
    4,363

    Awesome!

    This thread is turning into exactly what I had hoped. Thanks to all you guys for making it interesting. I work continental shifts and only get a few hours between days. This means today I can only listen to a bit of music, and post briefly.

    The next group I will post about became my favorite and showed me a back door to some of the heaviest cats to blow. It trumps alot of the music you commonly see people listening to.

    Anyhow here's my listening for today...

    Howard McGhee - Dusty Blue
    Bethlehem, 1961

    Howard McGhee (trumpet);
    Roland Alexander (tenor saxophone, flute);
    Pepper Adams (baritone saxophone);
    Bennie Green (trombone);
    Tommy Flanagan (piano);
    Ron Carter (bass);
    Walter Bolden (drums).



    Curtis Fuller - The Opener
    Blue Note, 1957

    Curtis Fuller - trombone
    Hank Mobley - tenor saxophone (tracks 2, 3, 5 & 6)
    Bobby Timmons - piano
    Paul Chambers - bass
    Art Taylor - drums




    Red Holloway - Red Soul
    Prestige, 1965

    Red Holloway (ts),
    Lonnie Smith (org),
    George Benson (g),
    Chuck Rainey (b),
    Ray Lucas (d).


  21. #21
    Super Moderator Site Moderator JohnMichael's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Central Ohio
    Posts
    6,307
    I am getting some ideas of albums to buy. Thanks Poppa and all for the suggestions.
    JohnMichael
    Vinyl Rega Planar 2, Incognito rewire, Deepgroove subplatter, ceramic bearing, Michell Technoweight, Rega 24V motor, TTPSU, FunkFirm Achroplat platter, Michael Lim top and bottom braces, 2 Rega feet and one RDC cones. Grado Sonata, Moon 110 LP phono.
    Digital
    Sony SCD-XA5400ES SACD/cd SID mat, Marantz SA 8001
    Int. Amp Krell S-300i
    Speaker
    Monitor Audio RS6
    Cables
    AQ SPKR and AQ XLR and IC

  22. #22
    Shostakovich fan Feanor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    London, Ontario
    Posts
    8,127
    Quote Originally Posted by poppachubby View Post
    ..
    I am surprised, I thought you {Feanor} didn't like jazz? That's a really solid collection Bill, lots of classics. I will make a few copies for you, we can listen to them on the way to the show!
    Sounds great, Chad.

    The fact is there is a lot of jazz I haven't really gotten into -- not quite the same as not liking it.

    My collection was pretty carefully choose, but I like some of it better than others; the only one actually dislike is the Rashaan Roland Kirk.

  23. #23
    Can a crooner get a gig? dean_martin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Lower AL
    Posts
    2,838
    My jazz collection looks a lot like Feanor's as far as style except that I do have a couple of guitarists like Grant Green and Kenny Burrell.

    Ike Quebec has a very pleasing sax tone on Soul Samba. I'm looking for some more bossa nova influenced titles that were popular during the days of Getz/Gilberto.

    I want to go back in time a little further too. I needs me some more Satchmo and the like.

  24. #24
    frenchmon frenchmon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    St. Charles Mo
    Posts
    3,271

    Dave Bailey Sextet...

    Hey My Man! Great thead...looks like I am a little late to the party as I just found this thread.

    Hey you know you cant talk about Byrd and Gryce with out Xtacy!



    But if you got "The Studio Sessions", you've got Xtacy which is a reissue of The Jazz Lab.....My Man! Thats good stuff....only die hard Jazz fans know about GiGi and what his contribution was.

    Heres one for ya My Man! Not to many know about this great drummer, and check out the killer line up!

    Dave Bailey Sextet..."GETTIN' INTO SOMETHIN"


    Uploaded with ImageShack.us

    Dave Bailey............Drums
    Clark Terry..............Trumpet
    Charlie Rouse........Tenor Sax
    Curtis Fuller............Trombone
    Horace Parlan........Piano
    Peck Morrison........Bass

    EPIC.......................1960
    Music...let it into your soul and be moved....with Canton...Pure Music


    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    W10 i5 Quad core processor 8GB RAM/Jriver 20/ Fidelizer Optimizer/ iFI Micro DSD DAC-iUSB 3.0/Vincent SA - T1/Vincent SP-331 MK /MMF-7.1/2M BLACK/MS Phenomena ll+/Canton Vento 830.2

  25. #25
    Forum Regular MindGoneHaywire's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Manhattan
    Posts
    1,125

    I don't like others.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •