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  1. #1
    Man of the People Forums Moderator bobsticks's Avatar
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    Hey jazzheads...

    If'n y'all haven't heard Wynton Marsalis' The Midnight Blues - Standard Time Vol. 5, this is a must own CD. Seriously, go out now...

    The liner notes (an excerpt):

    Technically, The Midnight Blues represents a harking back to the more traditional, “old school” approach to recording. Rather than having recorded each element of the ensemble separately and at different times - e.g., rhythm section, strings, and finally trumpet (a technique known as overdubbing) - all of the musicians were, in this case, captured on a state-of-the-art digital medium performing in the same room and in “real-time.” Furthermore, the musicians were not individually placed in isolation booths - enclosures that are frequently used to prevent one instrument from “leaking” into another instrument’s microphone.

    One advantage to this style of recording is that it permits the musician to participate in a free and spontaneous exchange of ideas with the other musicians. This “instant feedback” actually helps to shape the direction and content of an entire performance. Another advantage is that it enables the performers to balance the music naturally, thereby producing an aural experience on tape commensurate with what is actually taking place in the hall.

    For all of the above to succeed, the correct selection of recording hall was critical. In this case, in our pursuit of the appropriate character and acoustics, we decided on The Grande Lodge of the Masonic Hall in New York City.
    That alone, however, was not enough. After all is said and done, it was the true artistry and expression of Wynton Marsalis, his accompanying trio, and the arrangements of Bob Freedman which breathed new life into these wonderful ballads.

    –Steve Epstein


    This is absolutely true. Wanna check a great crossroads of what traditional live performances mixed with SOTA(at the time) recording techniques can do. Don't kvetsch, just listen...


    So, I broke into the palace
    With a sponge and a rusty spanner
    She said : "Eh, I know you, and you cannot sing"
    I said : "That's nothing - you should hear me play piano"

  2. #2
    Super Moderator Site Moderator JohnMichael's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobsticks
    If'n y'all haven't heard Wynton Marsalis' The Midnight Blues - Standard Time Vol. 5, this is a must own CD. Seriously, go out now...

    The liner notes (an excerpt):

    Technically, The Midnight Blues represents a harking back to the more traditional, “old school” approach to recording. Rather than having recorded each element of the ensemble separately and at different times - e.g., rhythm section, strings, and finally trumpet (a technique known as overdubbing) - all of the musicians were, in this case, captured on a state-of-the-art digital medium performing in the same room and in “real-time.” Furthermore, the musicians were not individually placed in isolation booths - enclosures that are frequently used to prevent one instrument from “leaking” into another instrument’s microphone.

    One advantage to this style of recording is that it permits the musician to participate in a free and spontaneous exchange of ideas with the other musicians. This “instant feedback” actually helps to shape the direction and content of an entire performance. Another advantage is that it enables the performers to balance the music naturally, thereby producing an aural experience on tape commensurate with what is actually taking place in the hall.

    For all of the above to succeed, the correct selection of recording hall was critical. In this case, in our pursuit of the appropriate character and acoustics, we decided on The Grande Lodge of the Masonic Hall in New York City.
    That alone, however, was not enough. After all is said and done, it was the true artistry and expression of Wynton Marsalis, his accompanying trio, and the arrangements of Bob Freedman which breathed new life into these wonderful ballads.

    –Steve Epstein


    This is absolutely true. Wanna check a great crossroads of what traditional live performances mixed with SOTA(at the time) recording techniques can do. Don't kvetsch, just listen...





    Wow, I have not listened to that one in a long time. It will be next in the cd player. I concur with bobsticks enthusiasm.
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  3. #3
    Vinyl Fundamentalist Forums Moderator poppachubby's Avatar
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    I have 1 - 6 on CD.

  4. #4
    Loving This kexodusc's Avatar
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    Don't have this one, but thanks for the recommendation...on the short list.

    Any Kermit Ruffins fans here? I'm finally gonna get to check him out our local Jazz/Blues Fest next month. I missed him in Chicago earlier this year by a few days.

  5. #5
    frenchmon frenchmon's Avatar
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    Thanks Sticks....I had to go back and read The liner notes again. After a first read I was like...thats nothing new, I have many a great Jazz recordings like that....a great deal of them are recorded that way....Miles "Kinda Blue" comes to mind but recorded with more than one mike, (the story goes Miles wrote the entire score in the back of a cab on the way to the studio, with the musicians not knowing what they where recording. Miles left space for improvisations by Coltrain and Cannonball, but the rest was all written down while in the back of a cab on the way to the studio and it was all recorded in one take....the result was a master piece and perhaps the greatest selling Jazz recording of all times.) as well as Oliver Nelson and many others. I have a few of my SACD's that where recorded that "New York Reunion" By McCoy Tyner and legendary drummer Jimmy Cobbs "Cobbs Corner" where both recorded with one mike in the center of the church hall they recorded in. After a reread it says...."The Midnight Blues represents a harking back to the more traditional, “old school” approach to recording."

    But I have not even known about that Winton score....so thanks, I'll have to go out and order that one.

    The odd thing about this topic is I was just thinking about the "old school way of recording" last night at Mr Peabodys house. I listen to a lots of old school Jazz more than anything, (B-Bop, West coast Cool Jazz, post bop Jazz, Avant-guard Jazz, Big Band-swing Jazz) so I don't hear a lots of over dubbing at all. But at MrPeabodys last night we decided to listen to some old school rock. He put on one of my old rock band favorites I havent listen to in years...Bachman-Turner Overdrive. They where really throwing down some licks, when I turned to Mr Peabody and asked.."I wonder how many tracts it took to make this album". HE looked at me but never responded. From listening to music recorded the "Old School" way you mentioned above, its obvious when you listen to other styles of music that over dubb tracts more that once.

    And speaking of Wynton who is also a great classical player...I heard him in an interview on NPR one year and they where talking about Classical Music Versus Jazz Music and the difference in the styles. Wynton replied 'the two are very different in that Jazz its totally natural to go out side the frame work to be set free while in Classical you are not free to do such, thus improvisations in Jazz is what makes the musician great". He then when on to remark...."when you leave classical you graduate into a new chapter which is Jazz. You never hear about great Jazz musicians who leave Jazz to go start a new career in Classical, but you do hear about great classical players leaving classical careers to explore the freedom that Jazz has to offer" I thought that was a profound statement by Wynton. I do know of two great musician other than Wynton who still records both Jazz and Classical music....Paul Winter is one and Kenny Wheeler is the other....I love them both.
    Last edited by frenchmon; 08-14-2010 at 06:47 AM.
    Music...let it into your soul and be moved....with Canton...Pure Music


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  6. #6
    Man of the People Forums Moderator bobsticks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnMichael
    Wow, I have not listened to that one in a long time. It will be next in the cd player. I concur with bobsticks enthusiasm.
    I hadn't listened to that one in quite a while either. All this talk of tubes versus solid state had me thinking about how rarely the absolutists on both sides take into account either the medium or recording techniques involved in the source.
    So, I broke into the palace
    With a sponge and a rusty spanner
    She said : "Eh, I know you, and you cannot sing"
    I said : "That's nothing - you should hear me play piano"

  7. #7
    Man of the People Forums Moderator bobsticks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by frenchmon
    Thanks Sticks....I had to go back and read The liner notes again. After a first read I was like...thats nothing new, I have many a great Jazz recordings like that....a great deal of them are recorded that way....Miles "Kinda Blue" comes to mind but recorded with more than one mike, (the story goes Miles wrote the entire score in the back of a cab on the way to the studio, with the musicians not knowing what they where recording. Miles left space for improvisations by Coltrain and Cannonball, but the rest was all written down while in the back of a cab on the way to the studio and it was all recorded in one take....the result was a master piece and perhaps the greatest selling Jazz recording of all times.) as well as Oliver Nelson and many others. I have a few of my SACD's that where recorded that "New York Reunion" By McCoy Tyner and legendary drummer Jimmy Cobbs "Cobbs Corner" where both recorded with one mike in the center of the church hall they recorded in. After a reread it says...."The Midnight Blues represents a harking back to the more traditional, “old school” approach to recording."

    But I have not even known about that Winton score....so thanks, I'll have to go out and order that one..
    Yup yup...some of the classics were recorded in just such a manner.

    Quote Originally Posted by frenchmon
    The odd thing about this topic is I was just thinking about the "old school way of recording" last night at Mr Peabodys house. I listen to a lots of old school Jazz more than anything, (B-Bop, West coast Cool Jazz, post bop Jazz, Avant-guard Jazz, Big Band-swing Jazz) so I don't hear a lots of over dubbing at all. But at MrPeabodys last night we decided to listen to some old school rock. He put on one of my old rock band favorites I havent listen to in years...Bachman-Turner Overdrive. They where really throwing down some licks, when I turned to Mr Peabody and asked.."I wonder how many tracts it took to make this album". HE looked at me but never responded. From listening to music recorded the "Old School" way you mentioned above, its obvious when you listen to other styles of music that over dubb tracts more that once...
    Ahh, some time at Chez-Peabody...very nice. Were y'all enjoying the CJ or the Krell? I remember being very impressed at the PRaT of the Krell...immense slam...but I can see the seductive side of those silky tubages as well.

    Quote Originally Posted by frenchmon
    And speaking of Wynton who is also a great classical player...I heard him in an interview on NPR one year and they where talking about Classical Music Versus Jazz Music and the difference in the styles. Wynton replied 'the two are very different in that Jazz its totally natural to go out side the frame work to be set free while in Classical you are not free to do such, thus improvisations in Jazz is what makes the musician great". He then when on to remark...."when you leave classical you graduate into a new chapter which is Jazz. You never hear about great Jazz musicians who leave Jazz to go start a new career in Classical, but you do hear about great classical players leaving classical careers to explore the freedom that Jazz has to offer" I thought that was a profound statement by Wynton. I do know of two great musician other than Wynton who still records both Jazz and Classical music....Paul Winter is one and Kenny Wheeler is the other....I love them both.
    He also described the difference between classical and jazz musicians as the difference between an artisan and an artist.
    So, I broke into the palace
    With a sponge and a rusty spanner
    She said : "Eh, I know you, and you cannot sing"
    I said : "That's nothing - you should hear me play piano"

  8. #8
    Do What? jrhymeammo's Avatar
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    'ta hell?
    I posted a reply on this thread and now it's gone...

    Anyhow, good post 'shutiky.
    I picked it up for $3.99 in Chattanooga and a bag full of other Jazz CD. I even found some Chesky SACD for $5.
    Great album, great recording, great price. Can't beat that.

    JRA

  9. #9
    frenchmon frenchmon's Avatar
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    Come to think of it....I know where a un-opened LP of Standard Time Vol.1 is for $4 bucks....I hope its still there tomorrow. Dog-gonat, I should have grabbed it when I had the chance Saturday!
    Music...let it into your soul and be moved....with Canton...Pure Music


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  10. #10
    frenchmon frenchmon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobsticks
    Yup yup...some of the classics were recorded in just such a manner.



    Ahh, some time at Chez-Peabody...very nice. Were y'all enjoying the CJ or the Krell? I remember being very impressed at the PRaT of the Krell...immense slam...but I can see the seductive side of those silky tubages as well.



    He also described the difference between classical and jazz musicians as the difference between an artisan and an artist.
    That Krell....what comes to mind when I think of Peabodys Krell is a fast, fast sports car.

    We where enjoying the CJ gear which I like very much. But if it where me and the money was right, I'd be switching out the Dynaudio's for some Canton Ergo's 670 DC.

    Yeah...That Wyton is a very smart man, and great artist.
    Music...let it into your soul and be moved....with Canton...Pure Music


    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    W10 i5 Quad core processor 8GB RAM/Jriver 20/ Fidelizer Optimizer/ iFI Micro DSD DAC-iUSB 3.0/Vincent SA - T1/Vincent SP-331 MK /MMF-7.1/2M BLACK/MS Phenomena ll+/Canton Vento 830.2

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