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  1. #1
    THC no THD!
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    Dueling Guitarists...

    Haven't seen this for awhile.
    Who's your top 5 - 10 guitarists?

    Mine:

    David Gilmour
    Joe Satriani
    The Edge
    Mark Knopfler
    Eric Clapton
    Billy Howerdel
    BB King
    Dave Matthews

  2. #2
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    a few

    Carl Filipiak
    Duane Allman
    Martin Barre
    Craig Chaquico(post Starship)
    Lee Rittenour
    Warren Hanes
    Robin Trower

    Too many for a list of 5

    Hyfi

  3. #3
    Global Village Idiot mad rhetorik's Avatar
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    Lightbulb

    When I think of "dueling guitarists," I automatically think of guitar duos (which are common to metal). Here are a few noteworthy duos:

    Mustaine/Friedman, Mustaine/Poland (Megadeth)
    Smith/Murray (Iron Maiden)
    Spitz/Ian (Anthrax)
    Schuldiner/Masdival, Schuldiner/LaRocque, Schuldiner/Shannon (Death)
    Tipton/Downing (Judas Priest)
    Thordendal/Hagstrom (Meshuggah)
    Stromblad/Gelotte (In Flames)
    That insane pair from the Dillinger Escape Plan (can't remember their names...)
    Allman/Betts (Allman Brothers, first lineup, not metal at all but boy were they skilled)

    You can keep that solo "guitar hero" nonsense--Vai, Satriani, and Malmsteem all sure can shred, but damn if they can show an ounce of restraint. The main exception to the "guitar hero" rule is Hendrix. He was the original, the best, and he could write great songs to boot. My fave blues guitarists are SRV, B.B. King, Muddy Waters, Peter Green (early Fleetwood Mac), and Buddy Guy. Bo Diddley was also notable, though he was too unique to really be pigeonholed into blues or even rock for that matter. Jazz guitar goes to Charlie Christian, Wes Montgomery, Joe Pass, and John McLaughlin (one of the very few guitarists who could've even played in the same room as Hendrix).
    "...and then at the end of the letter I like to write <i>'P.S. - this is what part of the alphabet would look like if Q and R were eliminated.'</i> "


    <b>_R.I.P. Mitch Hedburg 1968-2005_</b>

  4. #4
    Stainmaster Finch Platte's Avatar
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    I'm surprised...

    ...you didn't mention Shadows Fall. Their 2 guitarists go at it from time to time. And on the DVD that comes with the CD, they are sitting side by side, playing a few of the solos they play on the disc. Incredibly fast and precise.

    fp

  5. #5
    Global Village Idiot mad rhetorik's Avatar
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    Exclamation

    Quote Originally Posted by Finch Platte
    ...you didn't mention Shadows Fall. Their 2 guitarists go at it from time to time. And on the DVD that comes with the CD, they are sitting side by side, playing a few of the solos they play on the disc. Incredibly fast and precise.

    fp
    I haven't heard much Shadows Fall, but what I have heard has been better than the typical run-of-the-mill metalcore stuff (that would be metal mixed with hardcore, even though it basically sounds like Gothenburg-influenced thrash to me...hey, I don't make these labels up). May go buy one of their albums at some point.

    Another duo I forgot to mention is Akerfeldt/Lindgren from Opeth. A great pair, able to handle everything from pastoral acoustic strumming to full-on death metal riffage... but I gather that you don't like them. ; P

    EDIT: Another one that slipped my mind....Fripp/Belew of later King Crimson. Cool guitar tones and so tight they're incredible. Like on the title track of Discipline--how the hell did they do that? They can also kick back and do atmosphere too (think "The Sheltering Sky" and "Walking On Air").

    And I second the Verlaine/Lloyd. "Marquee Moon" is absolutely gorgeous, ten minutes long and not a single extraneous note.
    Last edited by mad rhetorik; 11-22-2004 at 01:14 PM. Reason: Silly word-blockers have a problem with the word "riff-age," for some reason.
    "...and then at the end of the letter I like to write <i>'P.S. - this is what part of the alphabet would look like if Q and R were eliminated.'</i> "


    <b>_R.I.P. Mitch Hedburg 1968-2005_</b>

  6. #6
    Forum Regular BarryL's Avatar
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    Thin Lizzy had a couple

    Quote Originally Posted by mad rhetorik
    Another duo I forgot to mention is Akerfeldt/Lindgren from Opeth. A great pair, able to handle everything from pastoral acoustic strumming to full-on death metal riffage... but I gather that you don't like them. ; P
    Whoever the two guitarists were for Thin Lizzy on the Jailbreak album were great. My favorite by them was the last song on the album, where they dual back and forth.
    "A spirit with a vision is a dream with a mission" - Rush

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    Holy crud Barry mentioned Thin Lizzy!

    I love Thin Lizzy, as many of you know, their dual lead guitarists gig was excellent.

    By the way one of their guitarists, Snowy White, plays co-lead on the Roger Waters dvd "In The Flesh", which is excellent.

    I like Steve Howe, Steve Hackett, Steve Morse, Phil Lynott (but he played bass), Michael Hedges (too bad he is dead huh), Ted Nugent and others a lot.

    Dave

  8. #8
    Forum Regular nobody's Avatar
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    Yeah, I like those Thin Lizzzy guitars too.

    And, I agree with those who when they saw deuling guitars thought of two guitar lineups.

    Probably my favorite two guitar lineup would be Television's Tom Verlaine and Richard Lloyd. Those two seemed to have the ability to stay close enough and locked together enough to give the song structure while still veering off in pretty divergent directions. The title track on Marquee Moon is a great example.

    I'd also toss out Mick Jones and Joe Strummer with the Clash. Their riffing back and forth on Police and Thieves always gets to me. OK, no real fancy stuff from either of these guys, but they were different enough players to have interesting interplay.

    Funny, but I've never been much of a lead guitar fan. Best example I can think of is everyone alwasy wants to talk about Slash in Guns & Roses, but I thought they pretty much blew after losing Izzy. His hard driving, grimey riffs gave the band a great propulsion they never seemed to have after he left.

    John Lee Hooker had a great guitar sound, as did a bunch of the other old bluesmen, but I never got into the more modren, how many notes can you play, white-boy blues like Stevie Ray and the like. I'm sure they can play, and I know I'm in the minority, but those guys just never did much for me.

    I like Jack White's sound. I hear good and bad about his technical merits, but he can carry a song with nothing more than a little rudimentary pounding from Meg, and I think that ability has to count for somethin'.

    You can always go with Django Reinhart for some beautiful jazz guitar sounds. I've tried to get into Wes Montgomery, but he's always sounded way to lite jazz for me. Maybe I just haven't heard the right records. Kenny Burrell's got some great stuff out.

    OK...I'm really getting to the point of rambling now, I'll stop.

  9. #9
    Close 'n PlayŽ user Troy's Avatar
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    Adrian Belew
    Bill Nelson
    Steve Hackett
    Mike Keneally
    Dave Gilmour

    But I'm weird that way.

    Twin guitar attack? Partridge and Gregory in XTC.

  10. #10
    DPM
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    I'm only allowed 5 to 10?

    Ok, Here goes.

    1) Michael Schenker--I love the melodic solos he did with UFO.
    2) Robert Fripp--I hear he actually writes his solos down on paper.
    3) Martin Barre--Great stinging little leads on some of those 70's Tull recordings.
    4) Steve Vai--The man isn't human.
    5) Satriani--The man who created the monster listed above.
    6) Gary Moore--I love what he did with Thin Lizzy.
    7) Ritchie Blackmore--Another guitarist known for some melodic solos. His work on Burn is extra good.
    8) Eric Johnson--This guy is long overdue for some new stuff.
    9) Ty Tabor--Did some good stuff with King's X.
    10) Ace Frehely--Kiss Alive. What else needs to be said.

    DM

  11. #11
    Forum Regular Whooptee's Avatar
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    I don't really care about technical expertise or "chops", so I doubt you'll see many of these on any greatest of all time list, but they're some of my favorite guitarists:

    Stephen Malkmus - His off-kilter sometimes anti-melodic meanderings combined with the occasional power riffs fascinate me to no end.

    Rick Rizzo - Man, when he goes off like on Ice Storm or Murder or that unruly solo at the end "In the Style Of", I'm in heaven. And speaking of squalling, feedback-drenched heaven...

    Neil Young - The guy makes anyone he happens to play with turn into Crazy Horse goodness. I have a Bob Dylan tribute with a huge all-star band and when Neil Young takes the stage the band's dynamic totally changes (for the better).

    Doug Martsch - Expressive, chaotic, gorgeously warped.

    Keith Richards - I think he's about the coolest guy ever.

    Willie Nelson - Him and his trusty old acoustic can conjour up some real magic.

    As for guitarist pairs, the aforementioned Verlaine/Lloyd are favorites. As are Lee Ranaldo/Thurston Moore, Frank Black/Joey Santiago, Kerry King/Jeff Hannemann, and the guys in Thin White Rope (Kyser/Kunkel).

    Some other faves would be: Tara Key, Tanya Donnelly, Richard Thompson, PJ Harvey and David Pajo.

    John

  12. #12
    THC no THD!
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    In The Flesh...

    I guess my Title was slightly misleading with the "Dueling" and all, but nonetheless has brought out some good picks and interesting thoughts.

    Thought I'd add a couple others I thought of:

    Will Ackerman and Alex de Grassi from Windham Hill come to mind not only for their exceptional talent, but the pure sound of the Windham Hill recordings.

    From the Roger Waters DVD "In The Flesh" mentioned earlier, all of them guys on that recording were at the top of their game. I saw that concert in Indianapolis back in 02 or 03 I can't remember, but does anyone know if the guys on the DVD were the guys who toured with Waters that year? Other than Snowy White, I had never heard of the other 2 besides Waters. Anyone know anything about them?

    Thanks!

  13. #13
    Loving This kexodusc's Avatar
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    Yeah, I agree with mad rhetorik...when I think dueling guitarists, Mustaine/Freedman come to mind immediately.

    As for top 5, well mine varies a bit, but it probably looks like this:

    1) Joe Satrianni - Just a kid with a guitar
    2) BB King - vibrato extraordinaire
    3) John Petrucci - right balance of melody and chops
    4) SRV - self taught? Geez...
    5) Warren Haynes - the busiest, and most talented man alive.

    With honourable mention to Albert King, Freddy King, Jimi Hendrix, Eric Clapton...looking at this list, is there any doubt that the Blues started the electric guitar revolution???

  14. #14
    Close 'n PlayŽ user Troy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by J*E*Cole
    "In The Flesh"
    does anyone know if the guys on the DVD were the guys who toured with Waters that year? Other than Snowy White, I had never heard of the other 2 besides Waters. Anyone know anything about them?
    Excellent DVD.

    Yes, all the same players. Don't know anything about the lefty Jim Morrison look alike, but Andy Fairweather-Low was a 60s popster in England and has resurfaced as the uber-sideman also touring with Clapton and George Harrison.

    I was amused at the time that it took 3 guitar players to make up for one Dave Gilmour.

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    Hi all, just my two cents worth:

    1. Mike Oldfield (The guy is an unrecognised genius, listen to Amarok)
    2. Julien Bream (Can play any tune in any style and make it sound good)
    3. Steve Howe (On every Yes album with Steve playing Guitar there is a wow moment)
    4. Segovia (Someone to compare all other guitar players to as a reference)
    5. Jan Akerman (Focus on Sylvia, Janis or House of the King)

    The 5 above are not in any order of preference, just my idea of nimble clever fingers.
    Sagem HD45S, Yamaha RX-V2400RDS, Denon DVD 3910, Arcam CD 23T, PS 3, Kef Q7 + Townshend Maximum Super Tweeters Front, Kef iQ6C Center, Kef Q7 Side and Kef Q55.2 Rear Surrounds, Velodyne SPL800R, Kimber Power Kords, Kimber Select KS1011 Interconect CD to Amp, Kimber Tonic interconnects all other sources Kimber 8 PR Speaker Kable, Soundstyle Equipment Rack

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by J*E*Cole
    I guess my Title was slightly misleading with the "Dueling" and all, but nonetheless has brought out some good picks and interesting thoughts.

    Thought I'd add a couple others I thought of:

    Will Ackerman and Alex de Grassi from Windham Hill come to mind not only for their exceptional talent, but the pure sound of the Windham Hill recordings.

    From the Roger Waters DVD "In The Flesh" mentioned earlier, all of them guys on that recording were at the top of their game. I saw that concert in Indianapolis back in 02 or 03 I can't remember, but does anyone know if the guys on the DVD were the guys who toured with Waters that year? Other than Snowy White, I had never heard of the other 2 besides Waters. Anyone know anything about them?

    Thanks!
    Doyle Bramhall is the lefty guy on Waters 's in the flesh he has an album but haven't listened to it

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by J*E*Cole
    Haven't seen this for awhile.
    Who's your top 5 - 10 guitarists?

    Mine:

    David Gilmour
    Joe Satriani
    The Edge
    Mark Knopfler
    Eric Clapton
    Billy Howerdel
    BB King
    Dave Matthews
    Mi list is as follows
    Steve Howe.
    Steve Hackett.
    Al Dimeola
    Jhon Mclauglin.
    David Gilour.
    Santana.

    By the way i also tought as guitar duos and nobody so far as mentioned Santana/Neal Schon that were great back in the seventies.

  18. #18
    Forum Regular KEXPMF's Avatar
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    my favorite guitarist (not 'best' guitarist but my favorite for the style of playing he employed. I think it's called "finger picking". )

    Michael Hedges

    Does anyone recommend another artist with a sound similar to Hedges? I would love to find one. Very sadly, he died in a car accident in SF several years ago.

  19. #19
    Rocket Surgeon Swish's Avatar
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    How did we miss Lloyd/Verlain from Television?

    If we're interpreting the thread as "dueling" guitarists, I can think of no finer pair in rock music, although many others are notable. I don't think that was the intent of the thread since J.E. didn't list any duos, but I like the idea anyway.

    Swish
    I call my bathroom Jim instead of John so I can tell people that I go to the Jim first thing every morning.

    If you say the word 'gullible' very slowly it sounds just like oranges.

  20. #20
    THC no THD!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swish
    If we're interpreting the thread as "dueling" guitarists, I can think of no finer pair in rock music, although many others are notable. I don't think that was the intent of the thread since J.E. didn't list any duos, but I like the idea anyway.

    Swish
    I do apologize for the confusing title I chose. By "dueling" I meant to suggest the "rivalry" if you will between people's favorite guitarists, but failed to realize the other important interpretation, however it's all good, and I have been pleased with all the excellent choices and notes. I am sorry for this confusion and thank you all very much.

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    Duos

    Outlaws....Hughie Thomasson and Billy Jones

  22. #22
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    Thumbs up the best

    Hendrix, Clapton, Harvey Mandel, John Cippolina(Quicksilver), Jeff Beck, Leigh Stevens(Blue Cheer), and a hundred way tie with other 60's guitarists. Sorry if I'm old., but when the blue was banned and we stopped bein' free, the golden age of guitar was over.

  23. #23
    Can a crooner get a gig? dean_martin's Avatar
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    Here are some of my current guitar faves with a couple of duos thrown in:

    Wareham/Eden - Luna
    Moore/Rinaldo - Sonic Youth
    Rick Rizzo - Eleventh Dream Day
    J. Mascis - Dinosaur jr.
    Doug Martsch - Built to Spill

    I like the 2-guitar formula when a band gets the right blend of tones from humbuckers and single coils (Les Paul and Strat, for example). Feedback is a plus, too.

    Then I've got my classic old school list:

    Chuck Berry
    Jimi Hendrix
    Keith Richards
    John Fogerty
    Neil Young

    Then I have my rock-a-billy/surf list:

    Duane Eddy
    Rick Miller - Southern Culture on the Skids
    Link Wray
    Nokie Edwards - The Ventures
    Luther Perkins - Tennessee Two (Johnny Cash)

  24. #24
    Global Village Idiot mad rhetorik's Avatar
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    Arrow

    Quote Originally Posted by Whooptee
    Neil Young - The guy makes anyone he happens to play with turn into Crazy Horse goodness. I have a Bob Dylan tribute with a huge all-star band and when Neil Young takes the stage the band's dynamic totally changes (for the better).

    As for guitarist pairs, the aforementioned Verlaine/Lloyd are favorites. As are Lee Ranaldo/Thurston Moore, Frank Black/Joey Santiago, Kerry King/Jeff Hannemann, and the guys in Thin White Rope (Kyser/Kunkel).

    John
    Neil is rad. Can't believe I didn't mention him before. As far as duo work is concerned, when Ol' Shakey was paired up with Danny Whitten (R.I.P.) on Everybody Knows This Is Nowhere they pulled off some awesome stuff. "Cowgirl In The Sand" still blows my mind. Neil's more recent guitar workouts on Weld and Ragged Glory also rule.

    I forgot to mention Frank Zappa too. Some may blame him for having a part in the whole "solo guitar hero/wanky shredfest" movement (he tutored Steve Vai and also released a 3-disc album made up of mostly solo guitar) though I liken Zappa more to Hendrix in that he was just a fountain of raw talent, and similar in that he wasn't traditionally schooled. He was also a helluva composer, one of the greats of the 20th century in my opinion.

    Moore/Renaldo are awesome. They really attack their guitars. Sonic Youth has been on my "Must See Live" list for a long time now.

    Joey Santiago is wild. Not much in the way of technical ability, but he manages one of the most creative and psycho guitar sounds ever. Like Spanish guitar on amphetamines, or something. Greg Ginn of Black Flag and Fred "Sonic" Smith and Wayne Kramer of The MC5 were pretty rad too.

    Two more words: Dick Dale. 'Nuff said. Okay, one more word: "Miserlou."

    Never liked King and Hanneman, though. Their solos sound like a couple of novices screwing around, just obnoxious. Part of the reason why I think Slayer is phenomenally overrated. I realize mine is a minority opinion.


    Quote Originally Posted by nobody
    You can always go with Django Reinhart for some beautiful jazz guitar sounds.
    Damn straight.

    On another note, I think Clapton's overrated in the extreme. Oh sure, he's talented enough, but he doesn't capture that the blues essence is about feeling and not simply technique. SRV, Hendrix, and the Allmans all understood that. Clapton on the other hand approaches the blues with clinical precision and doesn't play with nearly enough grit or emotion. And if I hear that goddamn "Tears In Heaven" treacle one more time I'm gonna be sick. About the only stuff I can stand of his is his Bluesbreakers material with John Mayall and also Layla And Other Assorted Love Songs, though Duane Allman and Bobby Whitlock are the real draw for me in regards to that album. Cream hasn't aged well, and the post-Layla stuff I couldn't care less about. Probably a controversial opinion but I'm sticking to it.

    All apologies for rambling. Hey, this thread's got like 23 replies, huh? Not bad. ; P
    "...and then at the end of the letter I like to write <i>'P.S. - this is what part of the alphabet would look like if Q and R were eliminated.'</i> "


    <b>_R.I.P. Mitch Hedburg 1968-2005_</b>

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    The scene from Crossroads.

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