• 05-24-2006, 08:46 AM
    bubslewis
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Feanor
    Priceless indeed. Thanks, bubs. No, I don't see that you missed a thing.

    Let me ask, though, are multiple parallel capacitors and/or a by-pass cap good ideas?

    Feanor, Magnepan manufactures the 1.6 using parallel capacitors in their crossover. What I'm doing is simply exchanging their parallel capacitor combo with a higher quality combo (minus the by pass). The total capacitance of the new capacitors will be the same as the original combo of 22 uF.

    Same with the inductor spool. Just using a better one with the same 3.5 mH value as the original.

    I have no idea if using a single 22uF capacitor is better/worse than a parallel setup that totals 22uF's. I kinda think either way would be OK.

    I just ordered the capacitors and inductors, so I am now committed to doing this. Upgrading the capacitors and inductor spool seems to be the biggest bang for the buck as far as sonic improvement. I'll consider the wiring upgrade after I determine the extent of improvement (if any) from the new caps/spools (new caps have a 40 hour burn in period).

    I figure if I can do this then just about anybody else could too. If significant improvement results then you might want to consider trying it with your 1.6's.

    Will keep you posted.

    thanks,
    Bill
  • 05-24-2006, 02:46 PM
    JoeE SP9
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by bubslewis
    JoeE SP9, thanks again for your offer of assistance. I still may need some help at some point here.

    All of us are curious as to what you will hear or not, when this is over. My offer still stands. Send me a PM and I'll give you my phone number. The way you are going I don't think you'll have any problems. You do have a large support group here and elswhere. So, if you need help there is plenty in the mix.:cool:
  • 05-24-2006, 03:06 PM
    JoeE SP9
    When you connect capacitors in parallel the voltage rating is increased. Two 10 micro farad 50volt rated caps wired in parallel will total 20 micro farad's capacitance and have a 100volt rating. When wired in series the voltage rating is whatever it is for the device with the lowest voltage rating (capacitor) but the capacitance is calculated the same way parallel resistance is.
  • 05-24-2006, 05:45 PM
    Feanor
    Good to know
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by JoeE SP9
    When you connect capacitors in parallel the voltage rating is increased. Two 10 micro farad 50volt rated caps wired in parallel will total 20 micro farad's capacitance and have a 100volt rating. When wired in series the voltage rating is whatever it is for the device with the lowest voltage rating (capacitor) but the capacitance is calculated the same way parallel resistance is.

    Thanks, Joe. I understand this better now, especially the voltage aspect.

    I think I've notice a trend in amplifier design to multiple power supply capacitors; as I recall the reason offered was that multiple capacitors unload faster singles for the same total capacitance -- I don't whether I got that right or whether it applies to crossover caps too.
  • 05-25-2006, 04:30 AM
    E-Stat
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by JoeE SP9
    When wired in series the voltage rating is whatever it is for the device with the lowest voltage rating (capacitor) but the capacitance is calculated the same way parallel resistance is.

    Unfortunately, you can't have your cake and eat it too. Series wiring does increase the voltage capability, but the capacitance is diminshed.

    http://sub.allaboutcircuits.com/images/10231.png

    My VTL power amps, for example use a pair of 400 volt 3300 uf caps in series for its power supply. That yields 1650 uf for its 550 volt rail.

    rw
  • 05-25-2006, 04:33 AM
    Florian
    I just wanted to say that i am very glad that this Planar Section is on its way to become a great resource and that more fans join in with Planar speakers..

    Cheerfully

    -Flo

    PS: About the silver plated copper rails. Try to use them for all conections. :-)
  • 05-25-2006, 01:39 PM
    JoeE SP9
    Thanks E-Stat. I got so frustrated trying to get this editor to display subscripts I got some of my information garbled.:cool:
  • 05-25-2006, 06:12 PM
    bubslewis
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by JoeE SP9
    All of us are curious as to what you will hear or not, when this is over. My offer still stands. Send me a PM and I'll give you my phone number. The way you are going I don't think you'll have any problems. You do have a large support group here and elswhere. So, if you need help there is plenty in the mix.:cool:

    JoeE SP9,
    Thanks. I feel reassured now (was afraid I might become a pain in the butt with continuous pestering questions). Will certainly PM you when I get started.

    Couple of quick questions while I'm here. Understand that I haven't cut open the back grill cloth or received any parts yet.

    1: The existing inductor spool uses wire leads that are soldered to the ends of wherever theyr'e going. The new inductor spool will hav foil. Am concerned about the best way to connect them. Will the foil be solderable and if so, is it easy or hard to connect them via solder? Could I punch a hole in the foil and connect them in a different manner?

    2: Are the inductor spool and the capacitors bi-directional? Simply put do they have an "in and an out"? I'm pretty sure I'll be able to orient them properly if they only go in one direction, but it would be one less thing I'd have to worry about if it didn't matter.

    thanks,
    Bill
  • 05-25-2006, 06:18 PM
    Florian
    1. The spools are VERY EASY to solder and Heat up extremely quick :-)
    2. Just make sure you connect them the same way on both sides :-)

    -Busy

    -Flo
  • 05-25-2006, 10:08 PM
    JoeE SP9
    Some caps are marked for direction. If there is no marking try to wire them for current flow in the same direction. I don't know if this makes a difference but it can't hurt. The same goes for the coils where it can make difference.:cool:
  • 06-24-2006, 07:41 PM
    bubslewis
    connectors vs solder
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Florian
    1. The spools are VERY EASY to solder and Heat up extremely quick :-)
    2. Just make sure you connect them the same way on both sides :-)

    -Busy

    -Flo

    Question: Is using connectors for crossover wiring better, worse, or the same as soldering the wires together? I have access to a wide variety of connectors including some nice star shaped 4 way connectors. These would (seemingly) be perfect for parallel wiring of the 3 capacitor combo I'm using for the tweeter side of the crossover on my maggie 1.6's.
    Zip, zip, zip, crimp, crimp, crimp and I'm done in 10 seconds. Almost seems too easy.

    I would guess soldering would be better since all the wires are physically touching each other with no other material present except the solder. Would using connectors introduce additional material into the signal path, thus increasing the chance of degrading the signal?

    Been on vacation for the last two weeks, but tomorrow I cut the back of my maggies open......... Oh god.

    Bill
  • 06-25-2006, 07:02 AM
    JoeE SP9
    Use solder if at all possible. Rat Shack has silver solder. It has a reasonably low melt point .:cool:
  • 07-08-2006, 09:31 PM
    bubslewis
    Crossover upgrade final report, almost
    Some observations after crossover upgrade of maggie 1.6's:

    Did I hear earth shattering, awesome, mind boggling improvements - No. Since the speakers already sounded great before I started, I believe there's no way a crossover upgrade would make a quantum leap in sonic improvement.

    Surprisingly, the bass sounded firmer, with a bit better extension.

    Vocals seemed a bit more forward. I liked this better since I thought the vocals were a little too recessed on some of the music I had listened to.

    I noticed a bit of a zing on the high end at times, but this disappeared after about 10 - 15 hours of playing time. I put the speakers back in the same position they were in before the upgrade, but found I liked the sound better after I moved them about two feet farther apart.

    I had trouble soldering the small solderable ends of the 12 gauge wire capacitors, so I used a 4 way connector. I've got a friend who knows solder, so shortly he'll help me undo the connectors and go with straight solder. This can only help on the high end.

    Will take some pictures when I finish the boxes.

    Bill
  • 07-09-2006, 06:17 AM
    JoeE SP9
    With any gear as good as your Maggy's changes are usually incremental. You may notice other subtle differences as the crossover parts age. I know there are those who will say this doesn't happen. For them it doesn't because their gear isn't as revealing. I'm curious about what you are using to drive your Maggy's. In any case I'm glad everything is working and that you are satisfied. You are already hearing things most people can't hear or don't believe exist. Welcome to the high end.:thumbsup:
  • 07-09-2006, 10:06 AM
    bubslewis
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by JoeE SP9
    With any gear as good as your Maggy's changes are usually incremental. You may notice other subtle differences as the crossover parts age. I know there are those who will say this doesn't happen. For them it doesn't because their gear isn't as revealing. I'm curious about what you are using to drive your Maggy's. In any case I'm glad everything is working and that you are satisfied. You are already hearing things most people can't hear or don't believe exist. Welcome to the high end.:thumbsup:

    I use a B&K 125.2 reference amp (don't know what the "reference" refers to). 125W @ 8 ohms, 185W @ 4 ohms, 30 amps peak current. Not the biggest amp in the world but it seems to do fine at any listening level that I have chosen thus far.

    Am also considering a better preamp for when I listen to music. I got some real good help from some forum members on a thread I started in the amp/preamp forum "can I use 2 preamps".

    tx,
    Bill
  • 07-09-2006, 10:46 AM
    JoeE SP9
    B&K has always made nice stuff. Reference usually means they charge more for it. Although Maggy's like lots of current, the load is almost completely resistive so they're actually easy to drive. I use an ARC SP9 MKII for a preamp. I have used ARC preamps since the early 80's. I can't give a higher recommendation than that.:cool: