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  1. #1
    Can a crooner get a gig? dean_martin's Avatar
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    Understanding Millennials?

    I've been doing some online research (and listening to and observing my son and his friends) in an effort to try to understand what makes Millennials tick. Generally, Millennials, aka GenYer's, are 18-30. It seems that transparency and full disclosure in all facets of life, including relationships, work, school, government, etc. are most important. The most extreme examples are Bradley Manning, Edward Snowden and Aaron Swartz. Admittedly, all the facts aren't in yet on Snowden and Manning. But the common thread among their stories is the release of information into the public domain with knowledge that their info dumping was legally or technically prohibited.

    I am perplexed by their attitudes toward privacy, however. I think from Baby Boomers to GenXer's, privacy is equal to secrecy. For example, I'm sitting hear typing under an assumed moniker. I'd rather remain anonymous on the internet (I'm probably naive in thinking I can) whereas Millennials have no problem sharing personal information, live feeds from their bedrooms and discussing what might be considered subversive thoughts and feelings online. They question the way the US government operates on a fundamental level. They KNOW anyone including FBI, CIA, employers, etc. can see what they're saying or doing online. My guess is that Millennials wouldn't care about being monitored if they knew why the government might be eavesdropping and agreed with the reason/explanation. In other words, they value transparency over privacy. They won't be stifled just because somebody might be listening in.

    The biggest debates in which my son and I engage often result in my saying, "But the Constitution says . . ." and my son saying, "But a better way is . . ." It took several conversations for me to overcome my uneasiness about this. I finally realized that my arguments were based on a 200+ years old document and his arguments were based on making the world a better place to live in.

    Technology has had a greater impact on Millennials than any other generation. Previous generations have benefitted from technology in the workplace and at home. But technology has never been so intertwined with human relationships as it is now and Millennials grew up with technologically enabled relationships. For Millennials, technology is THE means for sharing, i.e., transparency, which kind of brings me full circle. Millennials will not tolerate any restrictions or prohibitions on internet use or the sharing of information.

    The more I look into this, the more in awe I become. I think we'll be in good hands. In fact, we may need to turn over the reigns earlier than expected. We were supposed to give them something better than what we had. In many cases, the things that Millennials consider better were actually developed by their peers.

  2. #2
    Musicaholic Forums Moderator ForeverAutumn's Avatar
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    The biggest debates in which my son and I engage often result in my saying, "But the Constitution says . . ." and my son saying, "But a better way is . . ."
    I LOVE that your son thinks this way. I think that many of the ways that society approaches things needs to change. We don't live in the same world that we lived in 200 or even 20 years ago. Laws need to change, business models need to change, attitudes need to change! I keep trying to tell my employer that...maybe one day it'll get through to them.

    When I was in school we learned about the Industrial Revolution and how it changed things. Well, we are currenting living through the Technical Revolution. Phones are completely mobile. We can have video conferencing in our homes via Skype. Music is digital. So are movies and TV shows. We don't need a 'tape' to record a TV show, we just record it to a hard drive. The world is global. I can phone Customer Service and get help from someone across the planet. I don't have to go to store, I can order off the internet and have almost anything delivered to my front door. I mean, really, nothing is how it used to be. Yet people hang on to old attitudes and processes that are way outdated.

    My husband is very "old school" when it comes to technology. He doesn't really trust social media or see the point of it. He has a cell phone because it was a necessity when we were selling our house five years ago, and after that I made him keep it. He only turns it on when necessary. He never texts. I don't even think that he knows how. I, on the other hand, embrace technology. I don't think that I could live without a smartphone. I use text and Facebook to contact my friends and I'm always surprised when one of them actually phones me!

    A couple of years ago I tried to convince my husband that we should get rid of our landline. There's no reason to have both a cell phone and a home phone. But he just can't wrap his head around the concept of not having a home phone. Many of my younger friends have ditched their home phones and just use their cells.

    I have friends who won't let their kids get cell phones because they don't want them texting their friends all day. They don't understand that texting is the new phone call. It's how kids today communicate and there's nothing wrong with it just because it's not how we did it when we were growing up. They really need to get into this century.

    Even when I try to explain my on-line 'friendships' to people. The best way that they can understand it is if I explain that it's like having a penpal, only you don't have to wait weeks for a letter to arrive in the mail.

    It's a new world out there. The Millennials are being raised in it so they get it. I agree with you Dean, it's a good future and I look forward to seeing where we are in the next 20 years. I think it's very exciting!

  3. #3
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    I guess if I am reading this correctly, Millennials are the young people today that have no clue just how badly they are screwing things up for their future by posting anything that pops into their minds out on the internet for all to see. Every time I get a new resume to review for a possible interview, the first thing I do is Google the person, then I check Facebook. After that I look to see if they have a Linked In account. In many cases, the first 2 searches prove that the person should not even get an interview.

    As far as texting being the new phone call, I disagree. 80% of these young people cannot even articulate a full complete coherent sentence when asked a question. Their ads on Craigslist need interpreters. Their full attention and awareness of their surroundings is about a 4 inch square.

    I still have a landline because I have a very minimal cell plan for my wife and I to talk freely with each other, emergencies, and long distance calls at night or on weekends if it can be controlled. I have no data plan, texting is turned off. My landline in local only and also carries my DSL.

    Technology is cool but in the end, I predict it will highly contribute to the downfall of humanity. So many people can do nothing for themselves and depend on technology to run and fulfill their lives. I guess it is kind of odd that I have a Networking degree, work with software, servers, and worldwide networks....and I am Anti-Technology. All the guys around me buy every new gadget, tablet, smartphone, iPod, $150/month FiOS Cable-Sat plans and so on. I on the other hand have a retirement plan and a hard copy of ALL my paperwork. That's another thing, I refuse to go paperless.

  4. #4
    Shostakovich fan Feanor's Avatar
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    My first exposure to Millennial connectedness was 11-12 years ago. It's difficult to remember that this was pre-texting, pre-smartphone, pre-Facebook, pre-Twitter, but these folks were ready for them.

    A couple came into a restaurant were I was taking a meal. First they did was pull out their cell phones and call or look for calls. They ordered food. The guy got a call; apparently it was a buddy who was with some others in the street. He went out to commune them. Their orders arrived at the table: the girl picked up her cell and called him, "Your food is here".

    I remember thinking at the time that I really didn't want to be that connected. I still don't.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Feanor View Post

    I remember thinking at the time that I really didn't want to be that connected. I still don't.
    I think I am a little younger than you, but I am the same way.

    The last wedding I went to was for a cousin of my wife. We always get seated with a few other cousin couples. One couple spent at least 2.5 of the 4 hours looking at, texting on, calling people. I find this very disrespectful to the Bride and Groom as well as everyone around them. At times they were texting each other, while sitting elbow to elbow.

    I find this to be a disease and a big problem. As I said above, 80% of the people you see walking down the streets, crossing streets, walking in malls, and so on are staring down at their phone.

    Funny how in the good old days, every young girl wanted to carry a pocketbook. Now you cannot find a young girl that does not have a phone in their hands everywhere they go. The boys are no different but at least they have pockets in their pants....that are falling down.

  6. #6
    Can a crooner get a gig? dean_martin's Avatar
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    I think Millennials see social media differently than we do. Yes, the folks in charge now "investigate" potential hires by finding them on Facebook, Twitter, etc., but I think Millennials would resent someone using social media against them. Again, transparency and technology are important to them. When they're in charge, they won't be using social media for "got ya" moments that deprive someone of a job. They have faith in technology. Indeed, one theory I've heard from a few Millennials is that one day technology will do our work for us (or for them when we're no longer around) leaving them more time to grow and better themselves as human beings and to develop deeper relationships with their friends, family and significant others. I have difficulty comprehending how this will come about, but it sure sounds good. I'm pulling for them.

  7. #7
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    Social Media can be good and bad. I recently replied to a Facebook post very similar. A person who posts about every mundane action everyday in their life was complaining that someone might have been reading their facebook posts. Duh! if you don't want people to see it, don't post it. EVERY site can be hacked and everything you put out there CANNOT be taken back. If you don't want it public, don't publicize it.

    It isn't much different than for every action, there is a reaction. I am not "Depriving" people of a job. We have to be very selective in our process because we spend about 6 months training someone before we let them loose on customers. It is a big investment and we interview about 50 people for every one we hire.

    If your an airhead, party animal, drug addict, alcoholic, gang banger, or whatever and you put it out there, then it can and will be used against you some day some how. For people to think otherwise, well they are very deluded. Maybe this needs to be added to school curriculum. Or better yet, maybe parents should be cluing their children in on how stupid their actions are and what it can do to them in the future.

    If one resents social media being used against them, then they should stop putting every aspect of their life in the public domain, period!

  8. #8
    Can a crooner get a gig? dean_martin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hyfi View Post
    Social Media can be good and bad. I recently replied to a Facebook post very similar. A person who posts about every mundane action everyday in their life was complaining that someone might have been reading their facebook posts. Duh! if you don't want people to see it, don't post it. EVERY site can be hacked and everything you put out there CANNOT be taken back. If you don't want it public, don't publicize it.

    It isn't much different than for every action, there is a reaction. I am not "Depriving" people of a job. We have to be very selective in our process because we spend about 6 months training someone before we let them loose on customers. It is a big investment and we interview about 50 people for every one we hire.

    If your an airhead, party animal, drug addict, alcoholic, gang banger, or whatever and you put it out there, then it can and will be used against you some day some how. For people to think otherwise, well they are very deluded. Maybe this needs to be added to school curriculum. Or better yet, maybe parents should be cluing their children in on how stupid their actions are and what it can do to them in the future.

    If one resents social media being used against them, then they should stop putting every aspect of their life in the public domain, period!
    Every generation has its ne'er-do-wells, criminals and idiots. At least through social media we have a better chance of knowing who these people are, which, as you've demonstrated, is helpful in a twisted sort of way. Hell, mine is the generation of crack and meth heads. That doesn't mean everybody in my generation is a crack or meth head. I'm not talking about those celebrating their mischief on facebook. I'm talking about the open exchange of ideas which might be outside the mainstream or unconventional or public sharing of personal feelings which we all expereince at one time or another (such as grief, sadness, elation, excitement) but folks from older generations would refuse to share in a public setting.

    For example, in the past I'd lecture my son about debating politics, economics, and psychological development in social media because he often advances arguments that are outside the mainstream. I'd warn him that people including prospective employers, the government, etc. could see it. However, he already knows that better than I do, but free speech, the unfettered exchange of ideas, and debate to reach a consensus are far more important to him.

    Again, transparency is KING with Millennials. Pres. Obama knew this when he ran for his first term and he used that word over and over. The current perceived lack of transparancy in his administration may be his achilles heel when history is written by Millennials.

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    I would never hold an open debate on a valid topic over anyone's head. But when a person acts like an idiot, in most cases they are and it's good to find that out before investing time and money in them. We put them thru a deep background check also and a few that interviewed with flying colors, got whacked over their past, which may or may not have been out on the net.

    As far as outing secrets that are harmful, go for it. If you are doing nothing wrong, then you have nothing to worry about right?

  10. #10
    Musicaholic Forums Moderator ForeverAutumn's Avatar
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    I agree that for many people their downfall is putting too much information out there and being too open. I love FB as Hyfi knows. But I am very careful what I put there. You will find lots of picture on my page, but only a handful are of me. The smart Millenials know this too and are careful what they put in the public domain. My niece has a FB page and I've seen her tell people not to discuss certain things on her page. Probably because it's something she doesn't want her parents to see rather than because it will ruin her employment prospects. But the smart kids get it.

    I'm in Marketing and going to college part-time for my diploma. All of the Marketing courses and text books now discuss how to use Social Media to promote and sell your business. My husband is unemployed and looking for work. The first thing he was told to do by the recruiting agencies and other HR professionals was to update his LinkedIn profile.

    Today you are doing the hiring. 20 years from now you'll be retired and the Millenials will be in your place. Whether you like it or not, today's social media and technology is the future. You don't have to love it, but you do have to learn how to get along with it or be left behind.

  11. #11
    Man of the People Forums Moderator bobsticks's Avatar
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    God bless the millennials...yeah, they do stupid, dysfunctional things with technology...but, dammit, they've embraced the FWB concept wholeheartedly...
    So, I broke into the palace
    With a sponge and a rusty spanner
    She said : "Eh, I know you, and you cannot sing"
    I said : "That's nothing - you should hear me play piano"

  12. #12
    Musicaholic Forums Moderator ForeverAutumn's Avatar
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    I thought you all might find this article interesting.

  13. #13
    Shostakovich fan Feanor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ForeverAutumn View Post
    I thought you all might find this article interesting.
    Yes, interesting. Back about 4 years ago, not long before I retired, we had talk by consultant along very similar lines. While there's a lot of truth about what the millennials think or want now, one wonders how they'll feel once they're past the phase of callow youth.

    Some things don't change. Compliance with what your boss requires is one of them -- I doubt that it's changed much at author's marketing software company and I'm sure it hasn't changed most places. Similarly, the thing about your personal "mission" is that hardly any employers give a crap about it however they may string you along.

  14. #14
    Musicaholic Forums Moderator ForeverAutumn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Feanor View Post
    Similarly, the thing about your personal "mission" is that hardly any employers give a crap about it however they may string you along.
    I totally agree, but the point of the article is that they need to start giving a crap.

    I have mixed feelings about all of this. While I agree that some things need to change, and I think that many of the suggested changes are for the better, it begs the question... should businesses change their business model to attract Millennials or are Millennials expectations out of line with the real world?

  15. #15
    Shostakovich fan Feanor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ForeverAutumn View Post
    I totally agree, but the point of the article is that they need to start giving a crap.

    I have mixed feelings about all of this. While I agree that some things need to change, and I think that many of the suggested changes are for the better, it begs the question... should businesses change their business model to attract Millennials or are Millennials expectations out of line with the real world?
    Both maybe, but in today's job market, employers have the upper hand. There are a few hot-shot Millennials out there who can writer their own ticket: these a decided minority. The rest will end up baristas at best if they don't heed what employers expect of them.

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