Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Forum Regular
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    27

    Upgrading TV, blu ray, speakers..do I replace my Pioneer 1015 receiver?

    I am finally able to upgrade my very basic HT. I just bought a 54" Plasma, Sony blu ray player, will be getting new surround speakers, new console etc. I have a Pioneer VSX-1015TX receiver which I bought 3 years ago. It has served me fine although I don't use it (thanks to two kids under 3) nearly as much as I had planned. I use it mostly for movies/sports on tv, although do listen to music occasionally. I don't do either one that often, again due to the kids, so I don't need/want to spend an arm and a leg on something I will use once/twice a week. And I don't want to replace a 3 year old receiver that I paid $300 if I don't have to.

    So my question is..with all my new gear, is it advisable to upgrade my receiver? The 1015 does not have HDMI so I know that would be an upgrade but other than that, what would a replacement receiver get me? I don't want to spend more than $300 or so and I'd want similar sound quality as the 1015. My other reason for upgrading is that most of the TV consoles we're looking at are not very deep and the 18 1/2" deep 1015 may not fit in them. e.g. one of the consoles has interior depth of 18 3/4", the other has 20". Tight fits. I'm hoping newer receivers aren't that deep.

    Any suggestions on whether to upgrade and if so, any thoughts? I'd like to stick with Pioneer since it has served me well but am open to ideas.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    St. Louis, MO, USA
    Posts
    10,176
    You could make the 1015 work if you don't mind forgoing video switching and being able to decode HD audio from the Blu-ray. HD audio being Dolby Tru HD and DTS-MA which are said to be bit for bit the same as the master soundtrack. You would take your HDMI from Blu-ray direct to TV and use either optical or coaxial digital audio from Blu-ray to receiver. It may be a small sacrifice until you utilize the receiver more.

    It's probably more than what you want to pay but Marantz has a slim line receiver, can't remember the model. Some of the Yamaha are tall but not so deep. Your best bet is to measure the space you have and check receiver specs to see what might fit. I know you like your receiver but you might be surprised at the improvement in sound if switching.

  3. #3
    Forum Regular
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Posts
    126
    Stay with your Pioneer if you're happy with the overall sound. I'm in a similar situation where I have an older Denon receiver and am reluctant to upgrade. My LG blu-ray player has 7.1 analog output so I've connected analog cables to get HD audio (for material that actually has 7.1 output). But I've also kept my optical cable connected since most movies are 5.1 and I like to force the compressed audio (Dolby Digital or DTS) through all 7.1 speakers for fuller sound. Others on AR may differ on this, but I don't find the difference to be compelling enough to replace a receiver if you really enjoy it. Now, if you want to improve upon it or want the latest technological features, that's a whole different vantage point and you should figure out what you want. Good Luck!

  4. #4
    Forum Regular Woochifer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    6,883
    The 1015 is a very well regarded entry level receiver. A teardown article I read about that receiver indicated that the component costs alone were a higher than comparable receivers at that price point. Speculation is that Pioneer was trying to bump up their reputation and market share by creating a best in class receiver at that price point.

    That said, if you're happy with the receiver, you don't need to upgrade it immediately. Even with a non-HDMI digital audio connection and without the lossless audio tracks, you'll get an audio improvement because the Dolby Digital and DTS tracks on Blu-ray discs typically use higher bitrates than with DVDs. And these tracks are backwards compatible with nearly all 5.1 HT receivers.

    My setup uses a 9-year old Yamaha receiver and I do the video switching with an auto-sensing HDMI switchbox. The switchbox will cost less than $100, so that might be the way to go. You can always upgrade the receiver later on..
    Wooch's Home Theater 2.0 (Pics)
    Panasonic VIERA TH-C50FD18 50" 1080p
    Paradigm Reference Studio 40, CC, and 20 v.2
    Adire Audio Rava (EQ: Behringer Feedback Destroyer DSP1124)
    Yamaha RX-A1030
    Dual CS5000 (Ortofon OM30 Super)
    Sony UBP-X800
    Sony Playstation 3 (MediaLink OS X Server)
    Sony ES SCD-C2000ES
    JVC HR-S3912U
    Directv HR44 and WVB
    Logitech Harmony 700
    iPhone 5s/iPad 3
    Linksys WES610



    The Neverending DVD/BD Collection

    Subwoofer Setup and Parametric EQ Results *Dead Link*

  5. #5
    Forum Regular
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    27
    So it seems the only major drawback to keeping the 1015 is not having video switching?

    After reading these replies and talking to the wife, I'm leaning towards keeping the 1015 and likely cutting out a small piece of the back of the tv console we like. That will allow me to keep what I have for now and see if I can live with it.

    Thanks all!

  6. #6
    Forum Regular
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    27
    Quote Originally Posted by Woochifer
    The 1015 is a very well regarded entry level receiver. A teardown article I read about that receiver indicated that the component costs alone were a higher than comparable receivers at that price point. Speculation is that Pioneer was trying to bump up their reputation and market share by creating a best in class receiver at that price point.

    That said, if you're happy with the receiver, you don't need to upgrade it immediately. Even with a non-HDMI digital audio connection and without the lossless audio tracks, you'll get an audio improvement because the Dolby Digital and DTS tracks on Blu-ray discs typically use higher bitrates than with DVDs. And these tracks are backwards compatible with nearly all 5.1 HT receivers.

    My setup uses a 9-year old Yamaha receiver and I do the video switching with an auto-sensing HDMI switchbox. The switchbox will cost less than $100, so that might be the way to go. You can always upgrade the receiver later on..
    Woochifer, thanks for the reply. And I checked out your pictures of the HT setups. Love the bakers rack in the old setup! ; )

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •