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  1. #1
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    RG-6 & F Connectors question.....

    I'm helping my dad re-wire the entire house + addition with new RG-6. I have no idea what's in there now, RG-59 at best. I purchased bulk Canare RG-6, can't recall the exact cable number.

    My questio is what are the best brand/type of F cnnectors to use. I'm familiar with the old crimp, screw on ones but not the latest "compression" type.

    Will any F compressed connectors work, what tool/pliers will I need? Maybe Lowes has it all.....or do I need to use Canare conectors specifically. Is all RG-6 universal.

    Thanks guys - it's been a while since I've visited here.

  2. #2
    Suspended markw's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jamison162
    I'm helping my dad re-wire the entire house + addition with new RG-6. I have no idea what's in there now, RG-59 at best. I purchased bulk Canare RG-6, can't recall the exact cable number.

    My questio is what are the best brand/type of F cnnectors to use. I'm familiar with the old crimp, screw on ones but not the latest "compression" type.

    Will any F compressed connectors work, what tool/pliers will I need? Maybe Lowes has it all.....or do I need to use Canare conectors specifically. Is all RG-6 universal.

    Thanks guys - it's been a while since I've visited here.
    Actually, the "old" crimp-on F-connectors are the standard and have been for many, many years. It's he screw-ons that are the newcomers.

    To successfully work with these, you need a cable stripper. To attempt to strip the ends manually is an exercise in futility, particularly since you say you're doing a whole house.

    RG-6 connectors are pretty universal and can be considered a commodity, but be careful you don't get RG-59 connectors instead. These look the same but won't fit the cable.

    As for crimping them on, don't even waste your time with a pair of pliers. Buy yourself a proper crimper made specifically for this job. They come in all sorts of price ranges, from dirt cheap that work sometimes to several hundred dollars like the pros use. But, if given the choice, go for the "heavy duty" crimpers otherwise you may find that it might not work with all connectors.

    Your success and satisfaction can be gauged pretty much by what you spend, but you don't have to go for the top of the line. By that same token, don't go for the cheapest you can find. You'll regret that even more.

    Rat Shack used to offer a pretty good selection of both items in a varied price range. Don't know what Lowes has to offer.

    Both steps (stripping & crimping) take some practice. It's an art as well as a skill and don't be surprised if some of the crimps that "look good" still don't deliver the signal. Be prepared to do some over again. It's part of the game.
    Last edited by markw; 09-04-2007 at 06:16 AM.

  3. #3
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    Thanks for the reply Mark....but I'm not sure you're with me.

    I wasn't inquiring about the old school crimp connectors. I have a cable stripper for both RG59 and RG6 and a crimper. I was inquiring for info on the compression type connectors, where you don't have to strip cable - know what I'm talking about?

    These.....




    F-Conn commercial grade broadband connectors meet the rugged demands of home and commercial cabling use. They compress in a true 360 fashion which reduces impedance issues over standard crimp-type connectors. Internal "O" rings prevent moisture from entering the connector making them perfect for high moisture applications. Sold in packs of 5.

    No soldering
    Full 360 compression
    Can withstand more than 80 pounds of pullout force
    Radial design reduces impedance problems
    Internal "O" sealing rings prevent moisture migration
    AT&T approved
    Meets SCTE-IPC and Bellcore requirements

  4. #4
    _ Luvin Da Blues's Avatar
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    I used to "professionally" install CATV cable and I would go with the compression conns if you can get the tool. I never had any problems with them.
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  5. #5
    Feel the Tempo eisforelectronic's Avatar
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    I like snap n seals! Practice stripping a little bit before you do the house. Watch out for stray braids wrapping around the center conductor, leave extra cable behind the wall plates, and make sure you avoid any extreme bends in the cable. Home depot carries both the strippers and crimpers I use.
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  6. #6
    Suspended markw's Avatar
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    I learn something every day.

    Quote Originally Posted by jamison162
    Thanks for the reply Mark....but I'm not sure you're with me.

    I wasn't inquiring about the old school crimp connectors. I have a cable stripper for both RG59 and RG6 and a crimper. I was inquiring for info on the compression type connectors, where you don't have to strip cable - know what I'm talking about?

    These.....




    F-Conn commercial grade broadband connectors meet the rugged demands of home and commercial cabling use. They compress in a true 360 fashion which reduces impedance issues over standard crimp-type connectors. Internal "O" rings prevent moisture from entering the connector making them perfect for high moisture applications. Sold in packs of 5.

    No soldering
    Full 360 compression
    Can withstand more than 80 pounds of pullout force
    Radial design reduces impedance problems
    Internal "O" sealing rings prevent moisture migration
    AT&T approved
    Meets SCTE-IPC and Bellcore requirements
    This is something I didn't know about. It looks mighty good. I guess the cost of the tools needed and the connectors themselves and how they amortize over the long run would be the determing factor here.

    I've been doing my own cable runs for years and have been, up until now, satisfied with the "old" strip-and-crimp type connectors and I don't really use them that awful much. My strip-and-crimp stuff is long since paid for and I know how to use it and, unless I was going to do it professionally, would not likely not make another investment in this new stuff.

    Now, if I was just starting out, well...

  7. #7
    Oh where have ye gone RL?
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    If I had it to do over again...

    I'd have purchased the compression connectors and the tool, both available at my local Home Depot. IIRC, the tool was about $50, although a guy I work with claimed more like $100. I've got bits-n-pieces all over the attic from all of my *retries* and since you plan on doing an entire house it would certainly ease the pain.

    I don't know what the difference between Canare and other brands is, but I ran into a situation with cable that was extra thick. It had an extra layer of foil shielding. I was still able to use the regular crimp connectors but I had to set the blade on my stripping tool that cuts into shielding lower.
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