Results 1 to 18 of 18
  1. #1
    music whore Happy Camper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Greater Cincinnati area
    Posts
    157

    Pioneer Elite RPTV problem solved.

    I have a ten year old PRO 710 HD set that had been going out for the past year. While watching, the pic and sound would go out. In the beginning, I could bump the set and it would come back on. Eventually, it would not respond. I got on line and found out that this series had poor solder joints on their power boards.

    I pulled out the board and resoldered every joint. I am good to go now and saved a few grand by continuing use of a quality set. If you don't mind trying, some repairs are only intimidating until you try it.
    d HC b

  2. #2
    Charm Thai™
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Cleveland, Ohio
    Posts
    865
    Job well done HC. You must have been unbelievably relieved at the end.

  3. #3
    Forum Regular pixelthis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    tuscaloosa
    Posts
    5,528

    Cool

    Good job, but you'd be better off upgrading and giving this set to a
    homeless person to sleep in, IMHO.
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    LG 42", integra 6.9, B&W 602s2, CC6 center, dm305rears, b&w
    sub asw2500
    Panny DVDA player
    sharp Aquos BLU player
    pronto remote, technics antique direct drive TT
    Samsung SACD/DVDA player
    emotiva upa-2 two channel amp

  4. #4
    music whore Happy Camper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Greater Cincinnati area
    Posts
    157
    No, no, no. This set is still impressive compared to the flat panels. Better color, blacks and grayscale. The new ones are spectacular in the show room but are bright and fatiguing after a while. The one thing that's a drawback is 1080i vs p but 720 p don't look too bad for sports. The replacement cost of $3500 would have been tough leather to chew, glad I didn't have to give it up (yet). We did swap out our couches with home entertainment chairs though. Soooooo much better on the back.
    d HC b

  5. #5
    Forum Regular pixelthis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    tuscaloosa
    Posts
    5,528
    Quote Originally Posted by Happy Camper View Post
    No, no, no. This set is still impressive compared to the flat panels. Better color, blacks and grayscale. The new ones are spectacular in the show room but are bright and fatiguing after a while. The one thing that's a drawback is 1080i vs p but 720 p don't look too bad for sports. The replacement cost of $3500 would have been tough leather to chew, glad I didn't have to give it up (yet). We did swap out our couches with home entertainment chairs though. Soooooo much better on the back.
    Well, good luck with that ace, but RPTV tubes are driven much harder than direct view CRTS, the fact that they have lasted so long is a miracle, but I BET THEY ARE QUITE DIM.
    Its called viewer acclimation, you gradually get used to a gradually
    dimmer and dimmer pic.
    With a 55" panel selling for less than 1400 (for a decent one)
    your sets days are numbered, because you are looking at not one, but three replacement tubes, if you can find them.
    But don't fret, after looking at 1080p for awhile the tears shed for your big screen homeless condo will be few, especially when
    you free up enough floor space for another bedroom.
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    LG 42", integra 6.9, B&W 602s2, CC6 center, dm305rears, b&w
    sub asw2500
    Panny DVDA player
    sharp Aquos BLU player
    pronto remote, technics antique direct drive TT
    Samsung SACD/DVDA player
    emotiva upa-2 two channel amp

  6. #6
    music whore Happy Camper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Greater Cincinnati area
    Posts
    157
    Works til I'm ready to get a new set. That will be when the gimmicks and technology finds some stability. Right now, buying a tv is like a computer, obsolete by the time you get it home.
    d HC b

  7. #7
    Forum Regular pixelthis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    tuscaloosa
    Posts
    5,528

    Cool

    Quote Originally Posted by Happy Camper View Post
    Works til I'm ready to get a new set. That will be when the gimmicks and technology finds some stability. Right now, buying a tv is like a computer, obsolete by the time you get it home.
    ACTUALLY the opposite is true.
    A TV with an ATSC tuner is not going to be obsolete for years, decades even. 1080p is pushing the limits of display tech,
    don't have to worry about 2,000p for another decade or so.
    A DECENT led lcd will last probably longer than you will.
    AS A matter of fact, if you wanted a monitor that will last the
    ages now is the time to buy. Any set you buy will be non obsolete,non out of date for a very long time, at least until the robots take over.
    AS A matter fact I WOULD start shopping, as your current set will
    not last until you're "ready for a new one".
    Any set that old is working by the good grace of probability,
    every time you turn it on is a crapshoot, FYI.
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    LG 42", integra 6.9, B&W 602s2, CC6 center, dm305rears, b&w
    sub asw2500
    Panny DVDA player
    sharp Aquos BLU player
    pronto remote, technics antique direct drive TT
    Samsung SACD/DVDA player
    emotiva upa-2 two channel amp

  8. #8
    Forum Regular Woochifer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    6,883
    Quote Originally Posted by Happy Camper View Post
    Works til I'm ready to get a new set. That will be when the gimmicks and technology finds some stability. Right now, buying a tv is like a computer, obsolete by the time you get it home.
    Most of the standards for HDTV are pretty well set right now, so you don't need to worry about obsolescence in the near future. But, if you're getting the viewing enjoyment you want out of your current TV, and it works with all of your HD sources, then there's no need to upgrade right now.

    Like so many things with consumer electronics, whatever TV you buy right now, there will likely be a more fully featured and higher performing version selling for less money next year. For example, with 3D, you could've paid ~$300 more to get that feature last year, you could pay ~$100 to $200 more right now, or you could wait until next year and likely get the 3D feature for little to no added cost. Or even in my case, when I got my HDTV about 2 1/2 years ago, it cost $1,400. The current version of that TV, which performs better than mine, now sells for about $800.

    So, if you're happy with what you have, be happy. When you're ready to upgrade, you'll pay less for something better later.
    Wooch's Home Theater 2.0 (Pics)
    Panasonic VIERA TH-C50FD18 50" 1080p
    Paradigm Reference Studio 40, CC, and 20 v.2
    Adire Audio Rava (EQ: Behringer Feedback Destroyer DSP1124)
    Yamaha RX-A1030
    Dual CS5000 (Ortofon OM30 Super)
    Sony UBP-X800
    Sony Playstation 3 (MediaLink OS X Server)
    Sony ES SCD-C2000ES
    JVC HR-S3912U
    Directv HR44 and WVB
    Logitech Harmony 700
    iPhone 5s/iPad 3
    Linksys WES610



    The Neverending DVD/BD Collection

    Subwoofer Setup and Parametric EQ Results *Dead Link*

  9. #9
    music whore Happy Camper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Greater Cincinnati area
    Posts
    157
    I found a place that re-builds the tubes. So the question is whether or not to get the tubes done ($250 each) and ISF cal'ed or pay over twice as much for the Panasonic 65" 3-D plasma. Getting only two sets of glasses is squeezing the consumer. I'd prefer to see what the non-glasses screens will present. I think 3-D has a place but like when hi def first came out, they have to figure out how to use it. Right now it's just an animation enhancer (Ironman 2 didn't impress) caveat: not seen much content. Sports would be great when they can get the camera angles properly positioned. Remember the first years of HD was upconverted SD. The real HD shows were cooking shows, bug closeups & other crappola.

    Wooch- that is exactly why I'm in no rush to chase the latest/greatest. This system was set up for 1080i. Is it worthwhile to replace a TV, disc spinner, sat. box, etc. for the difference (right now)? I do not like LCD (have one) and plasma can be fragile. If the re-tube/cal(s) gets me to 4k p OLED (or whatever) by then, I'll be blind and won't appreciate it. Maybe the baby boomer death camps will have a nice set.

    In my years of being an A/V fan, I've had to buy vinyl, VHS, LD, CD, DVD, Blu-Ray, Hi Rez. audio..... Time to give consumer electronics (read my disposable income) a break. I'm not going to continue to pay inflated prices for the same material to be shown on purposely obsoleted technologies.

    There is one influence that may have a higher impact on this decision......mama.
    Last edited by Happy Camper; 05-31-2011 at 07:51 PM.
    d HC b

  10. #10
    Forum Regular Woochifer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    6,883
    Quote Originally Posted by Happy Camper View Post
    I found a place that re-builds the tubes. So the question is whether or not to get the tubes done ($250 each) and ISF cal'ed or pay over twice as much for the Panasonic 65" 3-D plasma. Getting only two sets of glasses is squeezing the consumer. I'd prefer to see what the non-glasses screens will present. I think 3-D has a place but like when hi def first came out, they have to figure out how to use it. Right now it's just an animation enhancer (Ironman 2 didn't impress) caveat: not seen much content. Sports would be great when they can get the camera angles properly positioned. Remember the first years of HD was upconverted SD. The real HD shows were cooking shows, bug closeups & other crappola.
    That's only an issue if your tubes are at a point where they can no longer deliver a picture within reference specs. Otherwise, all you have to do is sit back and watch the price on the 3D Panny continue to tumble.

    The main advantage of CRTs is that they are not fixed pixel grids and rescale much better than LCD and plasma sets. But, in your situation you also have a TV that cannot natively display 1080p, and at 65" you're well into the range where the upgrade in resolution is visible (generally, I think ~46" is where the advantages of 1080p are less visible).

    With 3D, I think the glasses-based sets will reach price parity with the 2D sets within the next year or two. (For one thing, the glasses will still cost extra, so that will make up for some of the eroded profit margins) At that point, the only 3D sets you'll pay extra for will be the glasses-free models, and I have my reservations about those sets because we don't know yet how the optics will affect 2D viewing. Right now, with glasses-based 3D, the feature has no impact whatsoever on regular 2D viewing.

    Quote Originally Posted by Happy Camper
    Wooch- that is exactly why I'm in no rush to chase the latest/greatest. This system was set up for 1080i. Is it worthwhile to replace a TV, disc spinner, sat. box, etc. for the difference (right now)? I do not like LCD (have one) and plasma can be fragile. If the re-tube/cal(s) gets me to 4k p OLED (or whatever) by then, I'll be blind and won't appreciate it. Maybe the baby boomer death camps will have a nice set.

    In my years of being an A/V fan, I've had to buy vinyl, VHS, LD, CD, DVD, Blu-Ray, Hi Rez. audio..... Time to give consumer electronics (read my disposable income) a break. I'm not going to continue to pay inflated prices for the same material to be shown on purposely obsoleted technologies.

    There is one influence that may have a higher impact on this decision......mama.
    And that's exactly why if you're content with your current setup, it's fine to wait it out, and when you're ready, a better set will be out there that costs less than what you would pay right now.
    Wooch's Home Theater 2.0 (Pics)
    Panasonic VIERA TH-C50FD18 50" 1080p
    Paradigm Reference Studio 40, CC, and 20 v.2
    Adire Audio Rava (EQ: Behringer Feedback Destroyer DSP1124)
    Yamaha RX-A1030
    Dual CS5000 (Ortofon OM30 Super)
    Sony UBP-X800
    Sony Playstation 3 (MediaLink OS X Server)
    Sony ES SCD-C2000ES
    JVC HR-S3912U
    Directv HR44 and WVB
    Logitech Harmony 700
    iPhone 5s/iPad 3
    Linksys WES610



    The Neverending DVD/BD Collection

    Subwoofer Setup and Parametric EQ Results *Dead Link*

  11. #11
    Forum Regular pixelthis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    tuscaloosa
    Posts
    5,528

    Cool

    Quote Originally Posted by Woochifer View Post
    That's only an issue if your tubes are at a point where they can no longer deliver a picture within reference specs. Otherwise, all you have to do is sit back and watch the price on the 3D Panny continue to tumble.

    The main advantage of CRTs is that they are not fixed pixel grids and rescale much better than LCD and plasma sets. But, in your situation you also have a TV that cannot natively display 1080p, and at 65" you're well into the range where the upgrade in resolution is visible (generally, I think ~46" is where the advantages of 1080p are less visible).

    With 3D, I think the glasses-based sets will reach price parity with the 2D sets within the next year or two. (For one thing, the glasses will still cost extra, so that will make up for some of the eroded profit margins) At that point, the only 3D sets you'll pay extra for will be the glasses-free models, and I have my reservations about those sets because we don't know yet how the optics will affect 2D viewing. Right now, with glasses-based 3D, the feature has no impact whatsoever on regular 2D viewing.



    And that's exactly why if you're content with your current setup, it's fine to wait it out, and when you're ready, a better set will be out there that costs less than what you would pay right now.
    No ten year old CRT will meet "performance" specs.
    THE ONLY reason this set is watchable is that the owner is used to it, witness the statement that current TV is too "bright".
    THE ONLY reason not to upgrade now is financial, all of
    the codecs and standards are pretty much set.
    I CAN TELL you when the owner will get rid of this set, and thats when one of the tubes dies, which will be in the next one to five
    years, because all three tubes will need replacing, at a cost of
    hundreds , maybe thousands, of dollars.
    IN THE AGE of the sub 1400$ 55" flat screen, that would be insane. SO YOU CAN measure the life of this set in years,
    most likely months, maybe even weeks.
    LG 42", integra 6.9, B&W 602s2, CC6 center, dm305rears, b&w
    sub asw2500
    Panny DVDA player
    sharp Aquos BLU player
    pronto remote, technics antique direct drive TT
    Samsung SACD/DVDA player
    emotiva upa-2 two channel amp

  12. #12
    Forum Regular Woochifer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    6,883
    Quote Originally Posted by pixelthis View Post
    No ten year old CRT will meet "performance" specs.
    Right, and you know the "performance" specs of every ten-year old CRT in existence?

    Quote Originally Posted by pixelthis
    THE ONLY reason this set is watchable is that the owner is used to it, witness the statement that current TV is too "bright".
    And the default settings for nearly every TV I've ever tried is brighter than the reference standard. How do I know this? I use a calibration disc to verify, and the reference level is what my eyes are acclimated to.

    If anything, Happy Camper knows a lot more about what's watchable, given that most unadjusted TVs ARE too bright and fatiguing over long viewing periods. If an owner is "used to" a calibrated picture, why would they want to go with something that they already regard as bright and fatiguing?

    Quote Originally Posted by pixelthis
    I CAN TELL you when the owner will get rid of this set, and thats when one of the tubes dies, which will be in the next one to five
    years, because all three tubes will need replacing, at a cost of
    hundreds , maybe thousands, of dollars.
    Read his post before launching into yet another uninformed tirade.

    And if his TV dies in one to five years, he'll be able to choose a better TV that costs less than what he would buy right now. Bottomline is that he fixed his own TV at no cost to himself, and he has clearly stated that he does not need or want a new TV right now. What's wrong with continuing to enjoy what he already enjoys?

    Quote Originally Posted by pixelthis
    IN THE AGE of the sub 1400$ 55" flat screen, that would be insane. SO YOU CAN measure the life of this set in years,
    most likely months, maybe even weeks.
    Given how many TVs you've bought and kicked to the curb over the years, you're hardly an authority for talking about longevity. Again, read HC's post. He already owns a LCD TV, and prefers the Pioneer. Why should he buy a new TV right now, if even your doomsday predictions indicate that it might last "years" longer?
    Wooch's Home Theater 2.0 (Pics)
    Panasonic VIERA TH-C50FD18 50" 1080p
    Paradigm Reference Studio 40, CC, and 20 v.2
    Adire Audio Rava (EQ: Behringer Feedback Destroyer DSP1124)
    Yamaha RX-A1030
    Dual CS5000 (Ortofon OM30 Super)
    Sony UBP-X800
    Sony Playstation 3 (MediaLink OS X Server)
    Sony ES SCD-C2000ES
    JVC HR-S3912U
    Directv HR44 and WVB
    Logitech Harmony 700
    iPhone 5s/iPad 3
    Linksys WES610



    The Neverending DVD/BD Collection

    Subwoofer Setup and Parametric EQ Results *Dead Link*

  13. #13
    Forum Regular pixelthis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    tuscaloosa
    Posts
    5,528

    Cool

    [QUOTE]
    Quote Originally Posted by Woochifer View Post
    Right, and you know the "performance" specs of every ten-year old CRT in existence?
    Didn't say I DID.
    On sets theres this little thing called a brightness control.
    AS crt's age they get dimmer as the phospers are used up,
    and as the set gets dimmer you adjust the brightness, when you can't adjust the brightness anymore, time for new tubes.
    No CRT with any age on it can meet the specs for a brand new tube. A ten year old tube is getting near the end of its life,
    especially one used in an RPTV, because those are driven harder
    than direct view

    And the default settings for nearly every TV I've ever tried is brighter than the reference standard. How do I know this? I use a calibration disc to verify, and the reference level is what my eyes are acclimated to.
    And this matters how?
    THE OLDER A TUBE GETS, the more you will have to adjust
    the controls up to compensate, its all relative.

    If anything, Happy Camper knows a lot more about what's watchable, given that most unadjusted TVs ARE too bright and fatiguing over long viewing periods. If an owner is "used to" a calibrated picture, why would they want to go with something that they already regard as bright and fatiguing?
    Because its kind of embarrassing to have guests over and they can't see your TV.
    PEOPLE are adaptive and get used to things. I have seen sets that are barely watchable, and the owners were complaining abouit something else!

    Read his post before launching into yet another uninformed tirade.
    Nothing in his post changes the fact that his RPTV is in its last days. CAN'T CHANGE THE LAW OF ENTROPHY

    And if his TV dies in one to five years, he'll be able to choose a better TV that costs less than what he would buy right now. Bottomline is that he fixed his own TV at no cost to himself, and he has clearly stated that he does not need or want a new TV right now. What's wrong with continuing to enjoy what he already enjoys?
    nothing, but if he keeps monkeying around with power circuits
    he won't be enjoying anything. THE DRIVING voltage for CRT is around 30,000 volts, and while the amps are low thats still
    enough to knock you on your a***.
    Think its worth risking your life for a TV with almost zero dollar value? AND YOU DYING would be easy compared to it catching
    fire and taking your family out with it in a fire, etc, and you
    surviving. WHAT FUN!!!

    Given how many TVs you've bought and kicked to the curb over the years, you're hardly an authority for talking about longevity. Again, read HC's post. He already owns a LCD TV, and prefers the Pioneer. Why should he buy a new TV right now, if even your doomsday predictions indicate that it might last "years" longer?
    he doesn't have to buy "anything", but he won't be watching
    that ten year old set much longer, just stating fact.
    And if hes not carefull with those power boards he won't be doing much of anything .
    People slay me with how much they get attached to inanimate
    objects , most of which are next to worthless.
    And FYI, I did trade sets for awhile, because I HAD RELATIVES THAT WANTED MINE.
    Truth is it did't cost me much, so I took advantage.
    But of course its "bad" for me to take advantage of a situation
    to get new sets often, but perfectly ok for a civilian to play around
    with power boards in an old, unpredictable TV set.
    MAKES about as much sense as anything else you said.
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    LG 42", integra 6.9, B&W 602s2, CC6 center, dm305rears, b&w
    sub asw2500
    Panny DVDA player
    sharp Aquos BLU player
    pronto remote, technics antique direct drive TT
    Samsung SACD/DVDA player
    emotiva upa-2 two channel amp

  14. #14
    Forum Regular Woochifer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    6,883
    Quote Originally Posted by pixelthis View Post
    Didn't say I DID.
    Actually, you did when you stated that no 10-year old CRT can meet "performance" specs. It's all too easy to disprove that, given how many CRTs can be calibrated to within the reference specs, even after 10 years.

    Quote Originally Posted by pixelthis
    On sets theres this little thing called a brightness control.
    AS crt's age they get dimmer as the phospers are used up,
    and as the set gets dimmer you adjust the brightness, when you can't adjust the brightness anymore, time for new tubes.
    No CRT with any age on it can meet the specs for a brand new tube. A ten year old tube is getting near the end of its life,
    especially one used in an RPTV, because those are driven harder
    than direct view
    In the 12 years that I had my last CRT TV, I only made one minor adjustment to the brightness the entire time. And the calibrated brightness setting still required less than 50% output all the way until we sold that TV after acquiring the HDTV. It had many years left precisely because I calibrated it and rechecked the output every year.

    Quote Originally Posted by pixelthis
    And this matters how?
    THE OLDER A TUBE GETS, the more you will have to adjust
    the controls up to compensate, its all relative.
    And like I said, I verified the settings on my TV every year, and made only one minor adjustment in the 12 years that we had it.

    Quote Originally Posted by pixelthis
    Because its kind of embarrassing to have guests over and they can't see your TV.
    Since when is a calibrated reference level "embarrassing" or something that you "can't see"? I've had plenty of guests over, and the first thing they note is how much better everything looks on my TV. I simply tell them, put their TV in Cinema/Movie mode, bump down the brightness and the sharpness, and it will very likely look much better.

    Quote Originally Posted by pixelthis
    PEOPLE are adaptive and get used to things. I have seen sets that are barely watchable, and the owners were complaining abouit something else!
    And what's your point? HC and I both calibrate our sets to reference levels. That's what we're used to. A set that has the brightness cranked up to torch mode is what I would regard as "barely watchable."

    Quote Originally Posted by pixelthis
    Nothing in his post changes the fact that his RPTV is in its last days. CAN'T CHANGE THE LAW OF ENTROPHY
    Last days? You even admitted that it might be years before his set finally konks out.

    Quote Originally Posted by pixelthis
    nothing, but if he keeps monkeying around with power circuits
    he won't be enjoying anything. THE DRIVING voltage for CRT is around 30,000 volts, and while the amps are low thats still
    enough to knock you on your a***.
    Think its worth risking your life for a TV with almost zero dollar value?
    Maybe you don't know this, but most people unplug the TV first before working on it. After the anode is discharged, there's no safety risk whatsoever.

    Quote Originally Posted by pixelthis
    AND YOU DYING would be easy compared to it catching
    fire and taking your family out with it in a fire, etc, and you
    surviving. WHAT FUN!!!
    Don't get out much, do you?

    Quote Originally Posted by pixelthis
    he doesn't have to buy "anything", but he won't be watching
    that ten year old set much longer, just stating fact.
    You don't know that for fact, given that you have zero idea of how much service life is left on that TV.

    Quote Originally Posted by pixelthis
    And if hes not carefull with those power boards he won't be doing much of anything .
    Judging from his results, he's doing just fine.

    Quote Originally Posted by pixelthis
    People slay me with how much they get attached to inanimate
    objects , most of which are next to worthless.
    And FYI, I did trade sets for awhile, because I HAD RELATIVES THAT WANTED MINE.
    Truth is it did't cost me much, so I took advantage.
    But of course its "bad" for me to take advantage of a situation
    to get new sets often, but perfectly ok for a civilian to play around
    with power boards in an old, unpredictable TV set.
    MAKES about as much sense as anything else you said.
    Like I said, you're hardly an authority on longevity given how many TVs have churned through your living room just in the time you've been on this board. People don't get "attached to inanimate objects" -- they just don't see a practical need to constantly buy new stuff when what they already have works perfectly fine. Constantly trying to convince people that their perfectly functional gear is in imminent need of replacement, is what makes no sense.
    Last edited by Woochifer; 06-03-2011 at 09:11 PM.
    Wooch's Home Theater 2.0 (Pics)
    Panasonic VIERA TH-C50FD18 50" 1080p
    Paradigm Reference Studio 40, CC, and 20 v.2
    Adire Audio Rava (EQ: Behringer Feedback Destroyer DSP1124)
    Yamaha RX-A1030
    Dual CS5000 (Ortofon OM30 Super)
    Sony UBP-X800
    Sony Playstation 3 (MediaLink OS X Server)
    Sony ES SCD-C2000ES
    JVC HR-S3912U
    Directv HR44 and WVB
    Logitech Harmony 700
    iPhone 5s/iPad 3
    Linksys WES610



    The Neverending DVD/BD Collection

    Subwoofer Setup and Parametric EQ Results *Dead Link*

  15. #15
    Forum Regular pixelthis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    tuscaloosa
    Posts
    5,528

    Cool

    [QUOTE=Woochifer;361795]Actually, you did when you stated that no 10-year old CRT can meet "performance" specs. It's all too easy to disprove that, given how many CRTs can be calibrated to within the reference specs, even after 10 years.

    Actually, they can't, and I CAN'T BELIEVE that such an intelligent person as yourself would say something so stupid.
    I HAVE been in circumstances where it was impossible to do
    anything with a five year old CRT, much less a ten year old one.
    WHAT, do you think a little phosper fairy is going to come by in the middle of the night and replate the face of the CRT with
    fresh material? Do you think , after ten years of 30,000 volts, that
    a new electron gun is going to mysteriously grow?
    A ten year old CRT HAS pretty much had it, there have been cases of CRT's lasting fifteen years, but those were direct view, not the more abused RPTV version, indeed, the fact that these tubes still work at all is a flippin miracle. And that picture cant be too good.


    In the 12 years that I had my last CRT TV, I only made one minor adjustment to the brightness the entire time. And the calibrated brightness setting still required less than 50% output all the way until we sold that TV after acquiring the HDTV. It had many years left precisely because I calibrated it and rechecked the output every year.
    And you are the typical user. yeah, right.
    IT WAS A SCANDAL, but manufacturers sold CRT sets from the factory with the picture set to "nova" mode( the contrast all the way up) in order to produce a brighter pic, and most ran them that way. NOW TELL THE TRUTH, first thing you did with your set was turn that down. BUT MOST DIDN'T, and your case is atypical.


    And like I said, I verified the settings on my TV every year, and made only one minor adjustment in the 12 years that we had it.
    And every user did this. I DID THE SAME AS YOU, you, me,
    and a few thousand other people. MILLIONS ignored the settings
    on their sets completely.


    Since when is a calibrated reference level "embarrassing" or something that you "can't see"? I've had plenty of guests over, and the first thing they note is how much better everything looks on my TV. I simply tell them, put their TV in Cinema/Movie mode, bump down the brightness and the sharpness, and it will very likely look much better.
    MY SET HAS a calibration program that improves the pic greatly.
    But on a ten year old CRT RPTV set you will have to watch that one in a dark room. For that matter, same with a new one,
    if its set right

    And what's your point? HC and I both calibrate our sets to reference levels. That's what we're used to. A set that has the brightness cranked up to torch mode is what I would regard as "barely watchable."
    And thats how most kept their CRT sets, thats the way they came from the factory, most preferred them that way. I AM TALKING
    about the average TV viewer, not the average HT freak

    Last days? You even admitted that it might be years before his set finally konks out.
    Thats the optimistic view, but if it lasts another year it will be a miracle.
    AND IF THE OWNER KEEPS MESSING WITH POWER BOARDS, he might "konk" out before long.


    Maybe you don't know this, but most people unplug the TV first before working on it. After the anode is discharged, there's no safety risk whatsoever.
    THE CHARGE in some capacitors can last for quite a long time,
    and some carry the power to stop a human heart.
    BUT even if you discharge everything, don't do everything right,
    its the fourth of july when you flip the switch.
    IS A TEN YEAR OLD TV really worth messing around with 30,000
    volt circuits?

    Don't get out much, do you?
    Not as much as I USED TO, used to work in an ER, and the regret you feel for doing something irreversible is not worth a ten year old TV

    You don't know that for fact, given that you have zero idea of how much service life is left on that TV.
    YOU CAN PUT IT IN THE BANK, especially since the OP has fixed the power supply(supposedly) changing every aspect
    of the circuit environment that those tubes are used to.
    As a matter of fact, there is an even better chance of those tubes failing now than before.
    It has been observed that if you fix something, something else usually fails in the next six months to a year. AND WE ARE TALKING ABOUT TEN YEAR OLD GEAR, ten year old gear
    that has 30,000 volts going through it.
    Its a wonder those tubes are still working.

    Judging from his results, he's doing just fine.
    SAID the airline industry on sept 10, 2001.


    Like I said, you're hardly an authority on longevity given how many TVs have churned through your living room just in the time you've been on this board. People don't get "attached to inanimate objects" -- they just don't see a practical need to constantly buy new stuff when what they already have works perfectly fine. Constantly trying to convince people that their perfectly functional gear is in imminent need of replacement, is what makes no sense.
    WHAT makes no "sense" is messing around with the high voltage
    of a ten year old monstrosity that was obsolete years ago, risking your life for, what? A FUTURE HOMELESS CONDO?
    As for my situation, it was a rare opportunity to get a new set every few years, are you jealous?
    BUT IF IT WILL sooth your delicate sensibilities it was atypical for me. HOWEVER, I have always gotten top dollar for my gear,
    people know my taste, and it has never cost more than a few hundred bucks to trade, and I DO LIKE THE LATEST TOYS.
    It might not make much sense to you to have the latest toys,
    I GUESS YOU DON'T GET OUT OFTEN.
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    LG 42", integra 6.9, B&W 602s2, CC6 center, dm305rears, b&w
    sub asw2500
    Panny DVDA player
    sharp Aquos BLU player
    pronto remote, technics antique direct drive TT
    Samsung SACD/DVDA player
    emotiva upa-2 two channel amp

  16. #16
    Forum Regular Woochifer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    6,883
    Quote Originally Posted by pixelthis View Post
    Actually, they can't, and I CAN'T BELIEVE that such an intelligent person as yourself would say something so stupid.
    I HAVE been in circumstances where it was impossible to do
    anything with a five year old CRT, much less a ten year old one.
    WHAT, do you think a little phosper fairy is going to come by in the middle of the night and replate the face of the CRT with
    fresh material? Do you think , after ten years of 30,000 volts, that
    a new electron gun is going to mysteriously grow?
    A ten year old CRT HAS pretty much had it, there have been cases of CRT's lasting fifteen years, but those were direct view, not the more abused RPTV version, indeed, the fact that these tubes still work at all is a flippin miracle. And that picture cant be too good.
    Once again taking a single anecdote and presuming that it must apply to everyone. Like I said, if my old CRT only required one minor adjustment in the 12 years that I used it, your point is moot.

    Quote Originally Posted by pixelthis
    And you are the typical user. yeah, right.
    IT WAS A SCANDAL, but manufacturers sold CRT sets from the factory with the picture set to "nova" mode( the contrast all the way up) in order to produce a brighter pic, and most ran them that way. NOW TELL THE TRUTH, first thing you did with your set was turn that down. BUT MOST DIDN'T, and your case is atypical.
    Right, a scandal. Keep looking out the window, those black helicopters might actually appear one of these days.

    Quote Originally Posted by pixelthis
    And every user did this. I DID THE SAME AS YOU, you, me,
    and a few thousand other people. MILLIONS ignored the settings
    on their sets completely.
    You've never done a real calibration on any of your TVs, as your past posts indicate that you don't use a calibration disc or any measurement device that assures uniform results. And who the hell cares about what you think "millions" of people have done? HC does calibrate his TV, and since this thread is about his TV, why the hell does your imaginary presumptions matter?

    Quote Originally Posted by pixelthis
    MY SET HAS a calibration program that improves the pic greatly.
    But on a ten year old CRT RPTV set you will have to watch that one in a dark room. For that matter, same with a new one,
    if its set right
    BS. I used a 12-year old CRT in a normal room, and it met calibrated reference levels with plenty of room to spare on the brightness scale.

    Quote Originally Posted by pixelthis
    And thats how most kept their CRT sets, thats the way they came from the factory, most preferred them that way. I AM TALKING
    about the average TV viewer, not the average HT freak
    And since HC calibrates his TV, why are you bringing this up, other than to further a failed argument?

    Quote Originally Posted by pixelthis
    THE CHARGE in some capacitors can last for quite a long time,
    and some carry the power to stop a human heart.
    BUT even if you discharge everything, don't do everything right,
    its the fourth of july when you flip the switch.
    IS A TEN YEAR OLD TV really worth messing around with 30,000
    volt circuits?
    Again, all of your faux paranoia doesn't matter one iota if the TV is unplugged and the anode is discharged.

    Quote Originally Posted by pixelthis
    YOU CAN PUT IT IN THE BANK, especially since the OP has fixed the power supply(supposedly) changing every aspect
    of the circuit environment that those tubes are used to.
    As a matter of fact, there is an even better chance of those tubes failing now than before.
    It has been observed that if you fix something, something else usually fails in the next six months to a year. AND WE ARE TALKING ABOUT TEN YEAR OLD GEAR, ten year old gear
    that has 30,000 volts going through it.
    Its a wonder those tubes are still working.
    In other words, you know absolutely nothing about HC's TV.

    Quote Originally Posted by pixelthis
    SAID the airline industry on sept 10, 2001.


    Quote Originally Posted by pixelthis
    WHAT makes no "sense" is messing around with the high voltage
    of a ten year old monstrosity that was obsolete years ago, risking your life for, what? A FUTURE HOMELESS CONDO?
    As for my situation, it was a rare opportunity to get a new set every few years, are you jealous?
    Why would I be jealous? I'm perfectly happy with what I own and use. Unlike you, I don't go grabbing at every bargain that comes along. I'd rather enjoy what I have until I'm actually ready to upgrade. Ever heard of depreciation and due diligence? Obviously not.

    Quote Originally Posted by pixelthis
    BUT IF IT WILL sooth your delicate sensibilities it was atypical for me. HOWEVER, I have always gotten top dollar for my gear,
    people know my taste, and it has never cost more than a few hundred bucks to trade, and I DO LIKE THE LATEST TOYS.
    It might not make much sense to you to have the latest toys,
    I GUESS YOU DON'T GET OUT OFTEN.
    I probably get out a lot more than you do, since I'm not the one crying poverty all the time. And I'm not the one turning my living room into a revolving door for every cheap TV and Blu-ray player that gets marked down at Sam's Club.
    Wooch's Home Theater 2.0 (Pics)
    Panasonic VIERA TH-C50FD18 50" 1080p
    Paradigm Reference Studio 40, CC, and 20 v.2
    Adire Audio Rava (EQ: Behringer Feedback Destroyer DSP1124)
    Yamaha RX-A1030
    Dual CS5000 (Ortofon OM30 Super)
    Sony UBP-X800
    Sony Playstation 3 (MediaLink OS X Server)
    Sony ES SCD-C2000ES
    JVC HR-S3912U
    Directv HR44 and WVB
    Logitech Harmony 700
    iPhone 5s/iPad 3
    Linksys WES610



    The Neverending DVD/BD Collection

    Subwoofer Setup and Parametric EQ Results *Dead Link*

  17. #17
    music whore Happy Camper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Greater Cincinnati area
    Posts
    157
    Just as a follow up. The big box 710 did indeed follow the death throws as suggested. The picture got darker and darker. It has now been replaced and I am enjoying a new Panasonic 65" plasma. I paid a third the cost of that 710 and while the pic is a bit better, I wouldn't go so far as to claim absolute dominance. Still, I was able to get another year out of the old beast before the end.

    And I tried to find a tube repair offering and they did not exist for the Pioneer. Sad because they were top quality for their time.
    d HC b

  18. #18
    AR Newbie Registered Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    1
    Well i am still using my Pioneer Elite Pro 710 HD RPTV I clean the screen ,mirror and guns at least once a year by removing the screen, you do not want to remove the back on these sets as the mirror will fall out and get broke as it will also damage the guns and screen also. The picture quality is still great and i have not had any issues with the cold solder joints on the power supply.I will use this RPTV until it dies. I bet it will out live any fixed pixel as they are throw away tv's lucky if you get 5 years out of them.I also use a calibration disc(Monster ISF series) My black levels (brightness) is set a only 7 not bad for a 11 year old RPTV and the picture is great still after all these years,but it only gets used 4-6 hours a day.I also added a HD fury 3 to the Pioneer so i have 2 HDMI ports for the new blue rays etc.
    Last edited by sideswiper; 02-22-2012 at 02:18 PM.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •