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  1. #1
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    'Burning in' TV station logos..

    Is this still a major problem with all RPTVs..? Was reading about Mitsubishi models and many owners seems to be totally disappointed by this problem appearing even after just a few months of cable tv viewing. Any inputs..suggestions? Do LCD/DLP RPTVs have the same problem?

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    Quote Originally Posted by jxnew
    Is this still a major problem with all RPTVs..? Was reading about Mitsubishi models and many owners seems to be totally disappointed by this problem appearing even after just a few months of cable tv viewing. Any inputs..suggestions? Do LCD/DLP RPTVs have the same problem?
    I own a Mitsubishi (WS55805) and have never had any problem in the last 4 years with burn in. Most of the time it comes from having the contrast and brightness up to High. Many people buy these nice RPTV and don't do their homework on how to maintain them. But if they have money to burn let it burn in............
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    Thanks for commenting. Other than bringing the contrast and brightness down, do you take any other measures to avoid this 'channel logo' ghost image problem? Do you watch regular cable on ur RPTV a lot or is it exclusively for movies..? If the tv is higher end (Mitsu Gold series or something), do they fare better in this regard or are they all the same when it comes to 'burn in'?
    Last edited by jxnew; 01-09-2004 at 05:48 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jxnew
    Thanks for commenting. Other than bringing the contrast and brightness down, do you take any other measures to avoid this 'channel logo' ghost image problem? Do you watch regular cable on ur RPTV a lot or is it exclusively for movies..? If the tv is higher end (Mitsu Gold series or something), do they fare better in this regard or are they all the same when it comes to 'burn in'?
    My Mitsubishi is the Platium line, but I had a Digital Essential disk ready to set it up when I brought it. If it was up to me it would be use only for special events, but the wife and kids out vote me, so it gets plenty of Nick toons and BET/MTV. And they all have TV's in their own rooms I mainly watch news, sports and movies. Now that I have HDTV I watch PBS just for the awesome pictures.
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    Does the burn in happen on LCD and DLP RPTVs?

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    What's called "burn-in" can afflict any display technology other than DLP, which is impervious to the problem. The only way to combat it is to do as has already been suggested ... turn DOWN the brightness AND the contrast, preferably to the levels prescribed by the "setup disc" such as Avia or Video Essentials.

    Fortunately, most (not all but most) TV networks are aware of the problem and have adjusted the brightness of their logos to a more benign level. Rest assured that anyone getting burn-in of station ID logos today have NOT turned their brightness and contrast down, but are instead running their sets in what's called "torch mode".

    Hope this helps you
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by woodman
    What's called "burn-in" can afflict any display technology other than DLP, which is impervious to the problem. The only way to combat it is to do as has already been suggested ... turn DOWN the brightness AND the contrast, preferably to the levels prescribed by the "setup disc" such as Avia or Video Essentials.

    Fortunately, most (not all but most) TV networks are aware of the problem and have adjusted the brightness of their logos to a more benign level. Rest assured that anyone getting burn-in of station ID logos today have NOT turned their brightness and contrast down, but are instead running their sets in what's called "torch mode".

    Hope this helps you
    And LCD . . . .burn in is a factor for any phosphor based image generator, not so with DLP or LCD . . .

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    Quote Originally Posted by IsmaVA
    And LCD . . . .burn in is a factor for any phosphor based image generator, not so with DLP or LCD . . .
    Not quite right, Isma. LCD is not immune from the problem, although they are far less likely to be affected than a CRT-based display (or plasma). The only display technology that is impervious to "burn-in" is DLP.
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    Quote Originally Posted by IsmaVA
    And LCD . . . .burn in is a factor for any phosphor based image generator, not so with DLP or LCD . . .
    Not quite right Isma. Although they are far less likely than phosphors to be affected by "burn-in", LCD displays are not immune from it. The ONLY display technology that is impervious to the problem is DLP.
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    LCD and Burn-in

    Quote Originally Posted by woodman
    Not quite right, Isma. LCD is not immune from the problem, although they are far less likely to be affected than a CRT-based display (or plasma). The only display technology that is impervious to "burn-in" is DLP.

    Wood, if you are talking about the degradation of the LCD matrix due to the exposure to light (including UV and IR), then yes, you are right.

    Personally, I do not call such degradation "burn-in" (however, some experts do) as it occurs to all the pixels on the screen at the same time (some locality and light-distribution issues affect the actual effect), not just those forming the static image. If the pixels are "turned off" the damage is actually accelerated as the pixel is absorbing more energy from the light source when it is "turned-off" that when it is "turned-on". To that regard static images are not really the culprit, but the opposite.

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    okay.. when you say LCD tvs, do you mean LCD projection TVs or LCD panel TVs... I was talking about the kind where it costs $3000-ish for a 50 inch TV.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jxnew
    okay.. when you say LCD tvs, do you mean LCD projection TVs or LCD panel TVs... I was talking about the kind where it costs $3000-ish for a 50 inch TV.

    The basic idea apply to both LCD panel and LCD rear projection TV's. However, the effect is negligible in LCD panel tv's due to the nature of the light source structure. Rear projection use smaller lcd panels with much more powerfull light sources, so the actual "light per pixel" is much higher.

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    So, when you say the 'static image burn-in' is negligible with LCD tvs, does that only mean the expensive LCD panel tvs? My understanding was that the actual burn in occurs on the screen itself, isnt that true?

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    Quote Originally Posted by jxnew
    So, when you say the 'static image burn-in' is negligible with LCD tvs, does that only mean the expensive LCD panel tvs? My understanding was that the actual burn in occurs on the screen itself, isnt that true?
    I was trying to use your own definition; you said "LCD projection TVs or LCD panel TVs". By LCD panel TV's I meant those which are not rear projection.

    About where the actual "burn-in" occurs it depends on what you call "screen". If you mean the actual LCD panel (LCD matrix) then the answer is YES. If by "screen" you meant the surface where the image is projected to, then the answer is NO.

    "Burn-in" occurs in the image forming apparatus.

  15. #15
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    Thanks! That explains it. Also, isnt it true that you dont need to do the occational convergence with the LCD RPTVs.. So does it mean that you will never have an out of focus picture and you will never need to a calibration (yourself or by an ISF technician).

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