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  1. #1
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    Best Router for streaming to Blu-Ray Player?

    I have an older wireless Netgear router b/g, 108Mb. Are the newer Lynksys n's any better for streaming? Any input on routers would be appreciated. My player is the Panny BD-85k.
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  2. #2
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    you need an N router to properly stream

  3. #3
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    Got the Netgear N600 (WNDR3400). Set up the Panny BD85k in about 15-20 min. and have been streaming HD movies flawlessly. Not one glitch. Of course I'm getting up to 24 Mbps download during the day through Cox cable. This setup rocks. I highly recommend the Panasonic BD-85k.
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  4. #4
    Forum Regular harley .guy07's Avatar
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    Linksys are good, I have attended training for linksys routers and they make several great n routers. remember the n1000 and 2000 has only one output so anything in your network that is under a n network card will slow any single output n channel to whatever speed the slowest unit can go. the e3000 while being more expensive actually has multiple outputs which means you could have a whole network for your computers and such which the speed would be the slowest unit in that network and then set up a whole other network for your n speed media devices which would have no way of getting slowed down do to older technology and the two separate networks can communicate with each other like they were on one network, very cool stuff but also netgear routers aren't bad either so just look around and ask questions when you shop.

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  5. #5
    Charm Thai™
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    Wow, really good info harley. I ran into that same situation at my sister's place with various G and N devices on the same network. Looks like the multiple output would solve the issue.

  6. #6
    Oldest join date recoveryone's Avatar
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    The one issue I see missing here is what level of downloadable bandwidth are you getting? if it is not above 10Mbps no matter what router you use, you will still have issues.
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by recoveryone
    The one issue I see missing here is what level of downloadable bandwidth are you getting? if it is not above 10Mbps no matter what router you use, you will still have issues.
    The OP says he got 24 with his new router

  8. #8
    Oldest join date recoveryone's Avatar
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    I saw that, just wanted to make sure that fact was not over looked, so if someone else read this thread they would read that the amount of bandwidth coming into the home is the first issue to look at than just upgrading to a new router.
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  9. #9
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    The Netgear N600 is simultaneous dual band (2.4GHz b/g/n and 5.0GHz a/n). I setup the home office (pc, laptop, printer) using the 2.4GHz feed and stream to the Blu Ray only using the 5.0GHz feed.

    What's interesting is that in both rooms that I have tried out the BD85k, it always sees better reception on the 2.4GHz network (5 bars). The 5.0 only shows 3-4 bars for some reason. I always thought the higher the frequency the better the range.
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  10. #10
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    Higher frequencies have lower range (faster attenuation in materials). Higher frequency should give you a higher theoretical maximum data rate, but your mileage WILL vary when it comes to WiFi.

    Don't use "bars" as a judgement for signal bandwidth or latency though - they're just a poorly-calibrated reference off a signal level. What really matters is how much data can get to your device in all conditions. Play really high bit-rate movies, download files on your laptop at the same time, etc, and see which one is actually better.

    Oh, and turn your microwave on while you're streaming. You may suddenly find you like the 5 GHz band waaaaaaaaaaaaay more than 2.4 GHz!

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