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  1. #1
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    Smile What was it like ?

    Times were very different , 50 years ago stereo was brand new. Most Americans owned monaural consoles. The LP was just coming into it's on. Record turntables were not very good and few audio companies had stereo amps. Most audiophiles had one speaker.
    Tape recorders were generally noisy and expensive.
    Believe it or not there was no Japanese audio equipment. All audio gear was either American are European.

    There was audio shows sponsored by the audio equipment manufactures., It was not usual
    to meet the owners and engineers of audio companies such as Marantz , Fisher , Scott,
    Bozak , Jensen , etc, at the audio shows. These men loved their work and enjoyed talking about
    it with people who attended the shows.
    They would even visit some homes of audiophiles.

    Most of us built our amps and speaker cabinets , and installed the raw speakers. There were few speakers that could not be purchased in kit form.
    Space will not allow me to list the names of all the pioneering audio companies. Most no longer exist. I have a 1962 Annual Stereo Review , there was less than 5 Japanese audio companies, 10 years later most of the audio companies were Japanese.

    Things have changed the audio industry has grown , most audio equipment companies are owned by large corporations are Japanese.
    At one time one could call an audio company and you might talk to the owner , Avery Fisher, not today , you are lucky to speak to a person.

    We live in an impersonal society today , technology has replaced face to face communication. The gape between the haves and the have nots is growing. At one time a Major League baseball player might live down the street. Not today with $200,000,000
    salaries.

    Many of the people of that generation is passing on. The younger generation will never have those experiences. It is very difficult today to talk to the younger generation.
    We don't dialogue as much as we did at one time. For that I am sorry.

  2. #2
    Suspended markw's Avatar
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    Well, fifty years ago I was nine years old and had just been exposed to my rich uncle’s Magnavox console radio/phonograph. That set off an acquisitional lust for music and something to play it on besides my one-tube Webcor phonograph with a crystal cartridge. But, at that age, one doesn’t have much say in what the family buys for music reproduction, particularly in a family that doesn’t appreciate music.

    Thankfully. My uncle and aunt nurtured my interest music and would take me to concerts in Newark and NYC and they bought me my first radio. An all-American five AM from Woolworth’s.

    Did I mention that my uncle was a teacher at a vocational school in Newark? No? Well, anyway, one day he dropped off an electronics textbook they used in the school (Elements of Radio, 4th Edition, Marcus and Marcus). I read this cover to cover several times and, by 1962, had built my first amp from that book, an AC/DC push-pull jobbie using two 50L6’s and two 12 SQ7’s. I used money from mowing lawns and shoveling snow for this and it would up in that little Webcor driving an automotive 6x9 speaker.

    Yes, I knew about stereo. For a Jr High schooler I was ahead of the curve. Somehow during htis time I got hold of an old Magnavox mono console and rebuilt it. It wasn’t really “hi-fi” but it sounded good to my young ears.

    I read about these new things called transistors and was fascinated with the changes it would afford. Smaller units, more power, better sound (well, maybe). Since this new stereo thing was just coming on boars, Some guys named Edgar Vilchur and Henry Kloss invented acoustic suspension speakers that allowed big bass from smaller cabinets.

    I had been doing AV work at the church and schools from he time I was 11. I subscribed to Stereo Review (or whatever it was at that time) and, in ’65 or so I saved enough to buy my first little stereo from Lafayette (LA-224A, Garrard AT-60 with a Pickering V-15 cartridge, and a pair of Criterion 50 speakers). I had (still have) absolutely no woodworking skills and although I was dreaming of the Dyancos, Heathkits, Eicos, Knights, and Lafayette kits of that era, parents is parents, and they didn’t want me buying a kit.

    Eventually I graduated high school in the summer of love. Thanks to my church work, my knowledge of stereo was known in the area and I got a job installing in one of the local hi-fi stores. Two months later I was offered the job of managing a stereo concession in a local Macy’s, which sold the big names. I wasn’t even eighteen yet. I got to attend two of the hi-fi shows in NYC.

    Then, when I turned eighteen, I got drafted but dodged that and went into the AF instead. When I got out, the concessions were closed, Radio Shacks popped up and so did the chain hi-fi stores.

    From that point on, hi-fi was just a hobby. I subscribed to the big three, Stereo Review, High Fidelity and Audio. The last two until they went out of business and I’m considering dropping what Stereo review morphed into but, honestly, it keeps me abreast on what’s current in the world of home entertainment.

    I accumulated a lot of toys over the years, some of which I mentioned earlier. Also several receivers, integrated amps, various turntables, speakers and the like before winding up with what make up my main systems.. But, my personal favorite system is my Marantz 2270 driving a pair of JBL L-26's and a Miracord 50H TT. asa concession to the 21st century, Ive added a Cd player and a Toshiba DVD/VCR for the office TV system. Yeah, it's not hi-tech or top of the line but, dang it, is sure sounds nice!

    Yes, it’s changed. The whole world has changed but nothing stays the same. Japanese stereos are no more. They are now made in china, Malaysia and other Pacific Rim countries. It’s a global economy and one must learn to accept that.

    Yes, young kids can’t say they lived through the changes we did but, on the other hand, they were born into the digital age and are more capable of that than we will ever be. That many don’t have an interest in pure audio is natural since, like learning to drive on a stick-shift, it’s not a part of their upbringing like it was for us. Most were brought up with CD’s multi-channel video, Ipods and the like’

    But for the few that do have that spark, it should be fanned and encouraged to grow, not snuffed out with sarcasm and elitism. Dialog is easy but, you must remember that it’s a two way street. Us old farts can learn at least as much from them about today‘s technologies than they can from us about yesterday’s marvels and guess what’s gonna be around longer?
    Last edited by markw; 12-31-2007 at 02:48 PM.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by melvin walker
    Times were very different , 50 years ago stereo was brand new. Most Americans owned monaural consoles. The LP was just coming into it's on. Record turntables were not very good and few audio companies had stereo amps. Most audiophiles had one speaker.
    Tape recorders were generally noisy and expensive.
    Believe it or not there was no Japanese audio equipment. All audio gear was either American are European.
    A tired old conversation Melvin. BTW, this would probably fit better in the Vintage Gear forum.

    Quote Originally Posted by melvin walker
    There was audio shows sponsored by the audio equipment manufactures., It was not usual
    to meet the owners and engineers of audio companies such as Marantz , Fisher , Scott,
    Bozak , Jensen , etc, at the audio shows. These men loved their work and enjoyed talking about
    it with people who attended the shows.
    They would even visit some homes of audiophiles.
    I suspect this is where you gracefully back away from your previous statements about the gentlemen you seemingly had personal conversations with. I stand by my previous statement, and I don't think its ME who has insecurity issues.

    Quote Originally Posted by melvin walker
    Most of us built our amps and speaker cabinets , and installed the raw speakers. There were few speakers that could not be purchased in kit form.
    Space will not allow me to list the names of all the pioneering audio companies. Most no longer exist. I have a 1962 Annual Stereo Review , there was less than 5 Japanese audio companies, 10 years later most of the audio companies were Japanese.

    Things have changed the audio industry has grown , most audio equipment companies are owned by large corporations are Japanese.
    At one time one could call an audio company and you might talk to the owner , Avery Fisher, not today , you are lucky to speak to a person.
    Again, there are probably a million threads here that have already covered this ground.

    Quote Originally Posted by melvin walker
    We live in an impersonal society today , technology has replaced face to face communication. The gape between the haves and the have nots is growing. At one time a Major League baseball player might live down the street. Not today with $200,000,000
    salaries.

    Many of the people of that generation is passing on. The younger generation will never have those experiences. It is very difficult today to talk to the younger generation.
    We don't dialogue as much as we did at one time. For that I am sorry.
    I don't think basite will agree with most of this.

    You left the other thread with many unanswered questions Melvin.

  4. #4
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    Things do change with time. Around a hundred years ago, John Philip Sousa bemoaned the invention of recorded music. His complaint was that recordings would result in fewer people learning to play musical instruments. He was looking down his nose at the experience you relish.

    I grew up many years ago and built Heathkit and Dynaco tube equipment and had a bunch of fun doing so. These days I do a lot of work with computer based music. I own equipment that would have been considered sheer fantasy in science fiction movies of the 1950s. I can enjoy music these days in ways that were impossible many years ago. (And one can even still find the top people in many small audio companies still easily accessible.)

    Each point in history offers its own mix of technology. We can either wish we were someplace else, in another time, or we can take advantage of where we are. I'm glad I had the past experiences I did, but I wouldn't trade where I am today.

    And, these and similar forums are full of people, young and old, who have very interesting conversations about audio on an daily basis. Anyone can jump in (and they do.)

    There, I think we just had a dialogue! ;-)

  5. #5
    Shostakovich fan Feanor's Avatar
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    Things are relatively good now ...

    Quote Originally Posted by melvin walker
    Times were very different , 50 years ago stereo was brand new. Most Americans owned monaural consoles. The LP was just coming into it's on. Record turntables were not very good and few audio companies had stereo amps. Most audiophiles had one speaker.
    ...

    We live in an impersonal society today , technology has replaced face to face communication. The gape between the haves and the have nots is growing. At one time a Major League baseball player might live down the street. Not today with $200,000,000
    salaries.

    Many of the people of that generation is passing on. The younger generation will never have those experiences. It is very difficult today to talk to the younger generation.
    We don't dialogue as much as we did at one time. For that I am sorry.
    Compared to what they are going to be. Yes, the world is increasingly impersonal. The takeover of audio by larger Japanese companies was merely a foretaste of what is to come thanks to "globalization". The sense of community we had as integral cultures and nations is being swept away, replaced with a media-manufactured, entertainment-based public mono-culture that is entirely meant to subjugate and exploit the masses for the benefit of an ever tinier, ever richer minority.
    Last edited by Feanor; 01-01-2008 at 09:56 AM.

  6. #6
    Suspended markw's Avatar
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    Well now, that's a warm, fuzzy thought to ponder this New Year's eve.

    Quote Originally Posted by Feanor
    Compared to what they are going to be. Yes, the world is increasingly impersonal. The takeover of audio by larger Japanese companies was merely a foretaste of what is to come thanks to "globalization". The sense of community we had as integral cultures and nations is being swept away, replaced with a media-manufactured, entertainment-based public obsession that is entirely meant to subjugate and exploit the masses for the benefit of an ever tinier, ever richer minority.
    I'm not saying it's not true, but couldn't ya have at least waited until the holidays were over???

    Remember, we've got elections coming up this year and so far the pickings are mighty slim on both sides. It looks like a lose/lose situation to me and I was hoping for one good drunk with happy thoughts tonight.

  7. #7
    Forum Regular blackraven's Avatar
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    I can remeber my father, an electrical engineer, building a Heath Kit high end stereo and speakers (for the time back then). That was my first introduction to good stereo sound. It had a separate tuner and integrated amp. I beleive it was part tube and solid state if I remeber correctly.
    Last edited by blackraven; 12-31-2007 at 03:33 PM.
    Pass Labs X250 amp, BAT Vk-51se Preamp,
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by markw
    I'm not saying it's not true, but couldn't ya have at least waited until the holidays were over???

    Remember, we've got elections coming up this year and so far the pickings are mighty slim on both sides. It looks like a lose/lose situation to me and I was hoping for one good drunk with happy thoughts tonight.
    Re-elect G.W!!!

  9. #9
    Super Moderator Site Moderator JohnMichael's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rich-n-Texas
    Re-elect G.W!!!



    Canada, here I come.
    JohnMichael
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  10. #10
    Shostakovich fan Feanor's Avatar
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    I built Dyanco

    Quote Originally Posted by blackraven
    I can remeber my father, an electrical engineer, building a Heath Kit high end stereo and speakers (for the time back then). That was my first introduction to good stereo sound. It had a separate tuner and integrated amp. I beleive it was part tube and solid state if I remeber correctly.
    In about 1971 I built a Dyanco PAT-4 preamp, a Stereo 80 power amp, and FM-5 tuner, all solid state. However before the FM-5 I built an FM-3 tube tuner. It's only in the last year that I've again owned a tube component, but I've often wondered how I'd have felt about tube if I'd build a PAS-3 instead of the PAT-4, and a Stereo 70 instead of the Stereo 80.

  11. #11
    Man of the People Forums Moderator bobsticks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnMichael
    Canada, here I come.
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  12. #12
    I took a headstart... basite's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rich-n-Texas
    I don't think basite will agree with most of this.

    You left the other thread with many unanswered questions Melvin.

    yeah,

    I don't agree with that indeed

    Happy new year to all, it's 2008 here already

    Keep them spinning,
    Bert.
    Life is music!

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    I'm a happy 20 year old...

  13. #13
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    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by markw
    Well, fifty years ago I was nine years old and had just been exposed to my rich uncle’s Magnavox console radio/phonograph. That set off an acquisitional lust for music and something to play it on besides my one-tube Webcor phonograph with a crystal cartridge. But, at that age, one doesn’t have much say in what the family buys for music reproduction, particularly in a family that doesn’t appreciate music.

    Thankfully. My uncle and aunt nurtured my interest music and would take me to concerts in Newark and NYC and they bought me my first radio. An all-American five AM from Woolworth’s.

    Did I mention that my uncle was a teacher at a vocational school in Newark? No? Well, anyway, one day he dropped off an electronics textbook they used in the school (Elements of Radio, 4th Edition, Marcus and Marcus). I read this cover to cover several times and, by 1962, had built my first amp from that book, an AC/DC push-pull jobbie using two 50L6’s and two 12 SQ7’s. I used money from mowing lawns and shoveling snow for this and it would up in that little Webcor driving an automotive 6x9 speaker.

    Yes, I knew about stereo. For a Jr High schooler I was ahead of the curve. Somehow during htis time I got hold of an old Magnavox mono console and rebuilt it. It wasn’t really “hi-fi” but it sounded good to my young ears.

    I read about these new things called transistors and was fascinated with the changes it would afford. Smaller units, more power, better sound (well, maybe). Since this new stereo thing was just coming on boars, Some guys named Edgar Vilchur and Henry Kloss invented acoustic suspension speakers that allowed big bass from smaller cabinets.

    I had been doing AV work at the church and schools from he time I was 11. I subscribed to Stereo Review (or whatever it was at that time) and, in ’65 or so I saved enough to buy my first little stereo from Lafayette (LA-224A, Garrard AT-60 with a Pickering V-15 cartridge, and a pair of Criterion 50 speakers). I had (still have) absolutely no woodworking skills and although I was dreaming of the Dyancos, Heathkits, Eicos, Knights, and Lafayette kits of that era, parents is parents, and they didn’t want me buying a kit.

    Eventually I graduated high school in the summer of love. Thanks to my church work, my knowledge of stereo was known in the area and I got a job installing in one of the local hi-fi stores. Two months later I was offered the job of managing a stereo concession in a local Macy’s, which sold the big names. I wasn’t even eighteen yet. I got to attend two of the hi-fi shows in NYC.

    Then, when I turned eighteen, I got drafted but dodged that and went into the AF instead. When I got out, the concessions were closed, Radio Shacks popped up and so did the chain hi-fi stores.

    From that point on, hi-fi was just a hobby. I subscribed to the big three, Stereo Review, High Fidelity and Audio. The last two until they went out of business and I’m considering dropping what Stereo review morphed into but, honestly, it keeps me abreast on what’s current in the world of home entertainment.

    I accumulated a lot of toys over the years, some of which I mentioned earlier. Also several receivers, integrated amps, various turntables, speakers and the like before winding up with what make up my main systems.. But, my personal favorite system is my Marantz 2270 driving a pair of JBL L-26's and a Miracord 50H TT. asa concession to the 21st century, Ive added a Cd player and a Toshiba DVD/VCR for the office TV system. Yeah, it's not hi-tech or top of the line but, dang it, is sure sounds nice!

    Yes, it’s changed. The whole world has changed but nothing stays the same. Japanese stereos are no more. They are now made in china, Malaysia and other Pacific Rim countries. It’s a global economy and one must learn to accept that.

    Yes, young kids can’t say they lived through the changes we did but, on the other hand, they were born into the digital age and are more capable of that than we will ever be. That many don’t have an interest in pure audio is natural since, like learning to drive on a stick-shift, it’s not a part of their upbringing like it was for us. Most were brought up with CD’s multi-channel video, Ipods and the like’

    But for the few that do have that spark, it should be fanned and encouraged to grow, not snuffed out with sarcasm and elitism. Dialog is easy but, you must remember that it’s a two way street. Us old farts can learn at least as much from them about today‘s technologies than they can from us about yesterday’s marvels and guess what’s gonna be around longer?
    There are many websites visited by hobbyist. Cars head the list. Many car buffs young and old .There are many publications for classic cars. Examples the magazines will compare older vs the newer ones. Recently a BMW magazine compared the new 6 series coupe with the older 8 series coupe. There was a lively debate. This was carried over to the 850 website. The last year of production for the 8 series sold in America was 1996.

    There are as for as I know no classic audio magazine , as a result most young people interested in audio has little knowledge of the earlier audio equipment and the men that made it all possible.
    The 8 series BMW in their last years of production sold for over $100,000. The new 6 series that replaced it is $20,000 cheaper . is it a better car ? of course with all the new technology. Is audio any different , of course not.

    The major difference today between audio and cars is as I said in an earlier post there are car clubs but there isn't any audio clubs. As for as comparisons , watch companies compares their watches to cars , clothing companies compares their clothing to both watches and cars , Jewelry companies compare their jewelry to cars, clothing and watches.
    At one time audio magazines compared the audio to cars. But there are few audio magazines.

    One does not have to live through a period to appreciate it , that is why we have history.
    Because of the shortage of audio magazines and the lack of audio clubs the history of
    audio suffers , young audio hobbyist are therefor not as exposed to classic audio as other hobbyist are.

    By the 1970's audio had reached a point in which the equipment had advanced to a point beyond human hearing. At that point only audio test equipment could determine the difference. Musical taste changed , speakers were designed for a different type of music , an example was the Bozak Symphany speakers. The JBL Paragon and the Tannoy Churchill's. All designed for music played to a different generation.

    Finally pop singer Johnny Mathis was asked what was the difference between today's music and when he started recording in the middle 1950's his answer was " decibels ,
    The music is played much louder today " Imaging is more of a priority today than in the days of Sinatra and Mathis.
    That that does not mean that the music of that era was better, even that can be debated
    but the music of today is different.
    If the music is different than naturally the music equipment is different. Bozak could not sell the concert Grands , BMW could not sell the 850's both were outstanding .
    Bozak went out of business , BMW was able to absorb the lost.
    Times have changed.

  14. #14
    frenchmon frenchmon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rich-n-Texas
    Re-elect G.W!!!

    You have got to be insain

    frenchmon

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    Quote Originally Posted by frenchmon
    You have got to be insain

    frenchmon


    To add to this tired same old same old... the only reason I keep my AKAI M9 Reel-to-Reel, my Pioneer SX-251 and my old Pioneer PL-400 TT is because it keeps me connected to my past while I work my way through my mid-life crisis. Beyond that, this 50 year old couldn't give a rats a$$ about what was. It's all about the here and now. I'll soon be retiring my little HTR to garage duty in order to make way for a bigger (more power) and better (more bells & whistles, including ethernet connectivity) workhorse.

    Oh, by the way, I drive a 2000 Firebird Formula with 320 rwhp, FWIW.

  16. #16
    frenchmon frenchmon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by melvin walker
    There are many websites visited by hobbyist. Cars head the list. Many car buffs young and old .There are many publications for classic cars. Examples the magazines will compare older vs the newer ones. Recently a BMW magazine compared the new 6 series coupe with the older 8 series coupe. There was a lively debate. This was carried over to the 850 website. The last year of production for the 8 series sold in America was 1996.

    There are as for as I know no classic audio magazine , as a result most young people interested in audio has little knowledge of the earlier audio equipment and the men that made it all possible.
    The 8 series BMW in their last years of production sold for over $100,000. The new 6 series that replaced it is $20,000 cheaper . is it a better car ? of course with all the new technology. Is audio any different , of course not.

    The major difference today between audio and cars is as I said in an earlier post there are car clubs but there isn't any audio clubs. As for as comparisons , watch companies compares their watches to cars , clothing companies compares their clothing to both watches and cars , Jewelry companies compare their jewelry to cars, clothing and watches.
    At one time audio magazines compared the audio to cars. But there are few audio magazines.

    One does not have to live through a period to appreciate it , that is why we have history.
    Because of the shortage of audio magazines and the lack of audio clubs the history of
    audio suffers , young audio hobbyist are therefor not as exposed to classic audio as other hobbyist are.

    By the 1970's audio had reached a point in which the equipment had advanced to a point beyond human hearing. At that point only audio test equipment could determine the difference. Musical taste changed , speakers were designed for a different type of music , an example was the Bozak Symphany speakers. The JBL Paragon and the Tannoy Churchill's. All designed for music played to a different generation.

    Finally pop singer Johnny Mathis was asked what was the difference between today's music and when he started recording in the middle 1950's his answer was " decibels ,
    The music is played much louder today " Imaging is more of a priority today than in the days of Sinatra and Mathis.
    That that does not mean that the music of that era was better, even that can be debated
    but the music of today is different.
    If the music is different than naturally the music equipment is different. Bozak could not sell the concert Grands , BMW could not sell the 850's both were outstanding .
    Bozak went out of business , BMW was able to absorb the lost.
    Times have changed.
    Melvin, I enjoy reading about your day and era. I am but 46, but I love to hear the music of the pioneers. I love the old folk blues created by those who recorded in the 1920's...I love the early negro spirituals, I love the early Jazz such as Armstong , I love the big band era with Chick Web, Glenn Miller, I liked Cole Porter, I love Dizzy, Bird and Coltraine, Dextor Gordon is my favorite Tenor Sax...oh that man walked and talked and even smoked his cigs in a why that made you say oh yes thats Jazz. I even love Dewy Redmans avangaurd Jazz.

    But you know what, when I play some of the older stuff such as the Old Robert Johnson blues stuff it just don't sound right played on todays gear. Why? Because of new technology. I love todays artist as well. I really love Yo Yo Ma and his Bass fiddle but I don't think yeasterdays gear would make it sound right. I love Eliane Elias...oh I think she put Diana Krall to a shame....Not taking away Diana's talent but Eliane is so much more polished in piano. But the gear of your era just won't do either of those ladies any good today as far as sound goes.

    So whats my point? Things have changed. And people must change with it. I'm sure some of the things you experienced as a young fellow made you smile and gave you wonderful memories. But you can't hold on to the past and not embrace the here and now and the future.

    Its almost like an insult to those of us who are here in the now. We look forward to the new stuff, its as if you don't want new stuff. I guess what I am trying to say is that there is some truth to the old saying The more things change, the more they stay the same" Its all good music, only better...Wine gets better with age. Just think if we never had the advancement in technology boom in the early 1900's the way we did..We would not even be having this discusion on this thing called the web, and you would never know what the 6 series BMW was. we all need to embrase change for teh better...Life Is Good!

    I know your heart is in what use to be, but it might do you good to go out and buy some new gear and take a listen. You certainly have given me the idea of going out an looking for vintage gear to play some of the older mono stuff thats out there..

    Just my two cents, and nothing more.


    frenchmon

  17. #17
    frenchmon frenchmon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rich-n-Texas


    To add to this tired same old same old... the only reason I keep my AKAI M9 Reel-to-Reel, my Pioneer SX-251 and my old Pioneer PL-400 TT is because it keeps me connected to my past while I work my way through my mid-life crisis. Beyond that, this 50 year old couldn't give a rats a$$ about what was. It's all about the here and now. I'll soon be retiring my little HTR to garage duty in order to make way for a bigger (more power) and better (more bells & whistles, including ethernet connectivity) workhorse.

    Oh, by the way, I drive a 2000 Firebird Formula with 320 rwhp, FWIW.
    Ain't nothing wrong with vintage. I'm a believer that we should preserve and remember that which bought us to this point, and that we should look to the future for better enjoyment . But to use the past as a weapon is just not right. I don't think Melvin ment to do that, but thats just what he did.

    Obtw, I drive a 1992 Satern. I'd rather put the money in new audio gear...I've already told the wife, I'm going to spend a least $10,000 on a good two channel system.

    frenchmon

  18. #18
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    I am 61 years old. At the age of 4, my father bought a 10 inch RCA television set for $400.I started to think about sound in my pre-teens. I remember friends who had hi-fi consoles. One friend had a Dumont television that had a 12 inch speaker, fm radio and phono jack that was so powerful you could hear the sound out of his appartment hundreds of feet away. Solid State reared its head in the '60s. I use to read the Lafayette catalog cover to cover just having a great feeling looking at all the audio equipment made by Lafayette and other manufacturers. In the 60s, my father bought a Maganavox stereo console, me thinking it was the greatest thing in the world. Actually the FM stereo radio sounded quite good. Years later, when I understood more about amplifiers, the power amp only had two 6bQ5 tubes so although the sound was nice, it really was not too powerful an amp, but the 12 inch speakers were very effecient. At that time my brother bought a HK compact system which were fairly powerful and fairly well made at that time.
    I also watched the coming of color television from its beginnings in the 50s and its improvements during the 60s looking at sets that people I knew could afford to buy them.
    In the 70s, I built a Dynaco sca-80Q int amp that really wowed my Marantz imp 6g speakers into a new realm. I also bought a Fisher X-100 tube amp that though not too powerful, had a great sound quality. I had been impressed with tube sound in the 1960s drifting into an appliance store somewhere on either Park or Lexington Ave in NYC listening on Empire commode speakers like the Grenadier, my favorites that I never got to own at that time. Such a rich audio-video history in the good ole days.

  19. #19
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    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by frenchmon
    Melvin, I enjoy reading about your day and era. I am but 46, but I love to hear the music of the pioneers. I love the old folk blues created by those who recorded in the 1920's...I love the early negro spirituals, I love the early Jazz such as Armstong , I love the big band era with Chick Web, Glenn Miller, I liked Cole Porter, I love Dizzy, Bird and Coltraine, Dextor Gordon is my favorite Tenor Sax...oh that man walked and talked and even smoked his cigs in a why that made you say oh yes thats Jazz. I even love Dewy Redmans avangaurd Jazz.

    But you know what, when I play some of the older stuff such as the Old Robert Johnson blues stuff it just don't sound right played on todays gear. Why? Because of new technology. I love todays artist as well. I really love Yo Yo Ma and his Bass fiddle but I don't think yeasterdays gear would make it sound right. I love Eliane Elias...oh I think she put Diana Krall to a shame....Not taking away Diana's talent but Eliane is so much more polished in piano. But the gear of your era just won't do either of those ladies any good today as far as sound goes.

    So whats my point? Things have changed. And people must change with it. I'm sure some of the things you experienced as a young fellow made you smile and gave you wonderful memories. But you can't hold on to the past and not embrace the here and now and the future.

    Its almost like an insult to those of us who are here in the now. We look forward to the new stuff, its as if you don't want new stuff. I guess what I am trying to say is that there is some truth to the old saying The more things change, the more they stay the same" Its all good music, only better...Wine gets better with age. Just think if we never had the advancement in technology boom in the early 1900's the way we did..We would not even be having this discussion on this thing called the web, and you would never know what the 6 series BMW was. we all need to embrace change for the better...Life Is Good!

    I know your heart is in what use to be, but it might do you good to go out and buy some new gear and take a listen. You certainly have given me the idea of going out an looking for vintage gear to play some of the older mono stuff thats out there..

    Just my two cents, and nothing more.


    frenchmon
    I have no problem with change. We are using the new technology exchanging different points of view on a computer. I would know what the 6 series is without the web , there are several magazines devoted to BMW some only to the coupes. My heart is not in what use to be , none of my post has indicated that. Because a hobbyist reads classic car magazines does not mean he does not appreciate modern cars.

    A man may own a gullwing 300SL Mercedes and a new SL 500. My music systems include s CD players , CD recorders , DVD players , DVD recorders and Ipods.
    Of my four audio system , one of the systems is devoted to older audio equipment.
    The BWM 850 may have been out of production for over a decade but the new BMW 650
    with limiters removed is a slower car.

    What I have done in my brief period posting on this site is discuss the history of audio.
    Discussed the audio systems that existed more than 4 decades ago. I have attacked no one and as called no one any names. I have not psychologized anyone.
    I have given my opinion and read others. I learned to respect all opinions., whether I agree are not.

    It is sad but it isn't worth the trouble continuing on this site.
    I wish all of you a happy new year.

  20. #20
    Shostakovich fan Feanor's Avatar
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    Don't be in a big rush

    Quote Originally Posted by JohnMichael
    Canada, here I come.
    For the move to be worthwhile we Canadians first have to get ride of the present Conservative Party government under our Bush lick-spittle lacky prime minister, Stephen Harper.

    The Conservatives are just like the U.S. Republicans: their agenda is controlled by global big business while their public appeal is based on the "free enterprise" sacred cow and totally disingenuous to appeal "family values". American voters are obviously fatuous but Canadian voters are no smarter.
    Last edited by Feanor; 01-01-2008 at 10:14 AM.

  21. #21
    Forum Regular audio amateur's Avatar
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    To my knowledge there is no such thing as a 650. That would be the M6.

    ps. I'm 20 and have been to several shows.
    Happy new year to all once again

  22. #22
    Forum Regular blackraven's Avatar
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    Oh yes there is a BMW 650. Your very mistaken. I've looked into buying this car. Check the BMW web site. The M6 is a totally different car. The 650 use to be the 645. There are series 3,5,6&7 BMW's. The M series is in a class by itself.
    Pass Labs X250 amp, BAT Vk-51se Preamp,
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  23. #23
    frenchmon frenchmon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by melvin walker
    I have no problem with change. We are using the new technology exchanging different points of view on a computer. I would know what the 6 series is without the web , there are several magazines devoted to BMW some only to the coupes. My heart is not in what use to be , none of my post has indicated that. Because a hobbyist reads classic car magazines does not mean he does not appreciate modern cars.

    A man may own a gullwing 300SL Mercedes and a new SL 500. My music systems include s CD players , CD recorders , DVD players , DVD recorders and Ipods.
    Of my four audio system , one of the systems is devoted to older audio equipment.
    The BWM 850 may have been out of production for over a decade but the new BMW 650
    with limiters removed is a slower car.

    What I have done in my brief period posting on this site is discuss the history of audio.
    Discussed the audio systems that existed more than 4 decades ago. I have attacked no one and as called no one any names. I have not psychologized anyone.
    I have given my opinion and read others. I learned to respect all opinions., whether I agree are not.

    It is sad but it isn't worth the trouble continuing on this site.
    I wish all of you a happy new year.
    One thing I have learned in life. Humility, constuctive criticism, and a positive perspective have gone by the way side for some.

    You have a wonderful new year as well Melvin.

    frenchmon

  24. #24
    Forum Regular pixelthis's Avatar
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    Cool

    Quote Originally Posted by Rich-n-Texas


    To add to this tired same old same old... the only reason I keep my AKAI M9 Reel-to-Reel, my Pioneer SX-251 and my old Pioneer PL-400 TT is because it keeps me connected to my past while I work my way through my mid-life crisis. Beyond that, this 50 year old couldn't give a rats a$$ about what was. It's all about the here and now. I'll soon be retiring my little HTR to garage duty in order to make way for a bigger (more power) and better (more bells & whistles, including ethernet connectivity) workhorse.

    Oh, by the way, I drive a 2000 Firebird Formula with 320 rwhp, FWIW.
    this is the silliest thing I have EVER heard, you're a yankee, so I guess I can excuse youir ignorance.
    You remind me of a quote from Daniel webster, who said, "its better to be thought a fool, rather than to speak up and remove all doubt".
    The "here and now" is a product of the past, they are connected by interwoven threads.
    Go back and watch some old tvshows from the eighties, everybody had a hot stereo,
    stuff like Tandburg, harmon (the real stuff) luxman, etc.
    Now even companies like Marantz and Classe are producing cheap crap thats LOOKS
    like high end gear, but aint.
    I have a dvd player that looks like a high end CD player, its six inches deep, and the only "chassis" is the folded metal box that the faceplate is attached to.
    What you fail to understand is that your "old" stuff is leagues better than some of your "new" stuff.
    In every civilization where the "new" stuff isnt as good as the "old" stuff, well, that civilization is dying. And the "here and now" is whats important?
    All of these plans for the future , they're based on your assets, right?
    You don't understand that with the dollars troubles lately you've lost at least 30% value
    from those assets.
    Which is why I call you "rich on paper" rather than rich in Texas, I meant no offense,
    its just that when you are ready to "cash in" dont be surprized if your "assets" wont buy a loaf of bread.
    Thats what happens in dying civilizations.
    But, hey, you at least have the "here and now"
    LG 42", integra 6.9, B&W 602s2, CC6 center, dm305rears, b&w
    sub asw2500
    Panny DVDA player
    sharp Aquos BLU player
    pronto remote, technics antique direct drive TT
    Samsung SACD/DVDA player
    emotiva upa-2 two channel amp

  25. #25
    Music Junkie E-Stat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by melvin walker
    By the 1970's audio had reached a point in which the equipment had advanced to a point beyond human hearing. At that point only audio test equipment could determine the difference.
    I have great news for you. There is a huge world of audio available today that is apparently beyond your awareness.

    Quote Originally Posted by melvin walker
    If the music is different than naturally the music equipment is different.
    First of all, there's a wealth of music that remains the same as it did 50 years ago. I'm not sure why you continue to believe that all musical recordings made today are poor. Such is not the case.

    rw

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