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  1. #1
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    Improve sound quality for a few dollars


  2. #2
    Forum Regular gonefishin's Avatar
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    not only does this candling NOT work...but it can cause real damage as well

    Quote Originally Posted by Beckman
    just say no!




    Why Candling Can't Work
    Since wax is sticky, the negative pressure needed to pull wax from the canal would have to be so powerful that it would rupture the eardrum in the process. However, candling produces no vacuum. Researchers who measured the pressure during candling of ear models found that no negative pressure was created. The same investigators candled eight ears and found that no ear wax was removed and candle wax was actually deposited in some of them! [3]

    The notion that the ear canal is connected to structures beyond the eardrum is false. A review of a good anatomy book should dispel this notion. The external ear canal, with an intact eardrum, is not connected to the brain, the sinuses targeted by the procedure (those above your eyes), or the Eustacean tubes (the passageways between the internal ear and the back of the throat). While some claim that the eardrum is porous and quickly allows impurities to pass through, this is untrue. The "impurities" that appear in the collected wax (usually on a paper plate or other collecting device) are nothing more than the ashes from the burnt wick and wax of the cone itself.

    Dangers Reported
    Candling poses several dangers, the most serious of which involve burning caused by the hot wax. Candle manufacturers claim that their candles will drip only down the outside of the ear, but shamefully few direct the user to hold the candle horizontally to prevent this. A 1996 survey of 144 ear, nose, and throat physicians, found that 14 had seen patients who had been harmed by ear candling, including at least 13 cases of external burns, 7 cases of ear canal obstruction with candle wax, and 1 perforated eardrum [3].

    Another case was reported by The London Free Press, a Canadian newspaper. A woman who experienced stuffiness in the nose and ear pains while scuba diving went to a local health-food store and was referred to a "qualified" candler. During the "treatment," she felt an intense burning in her ear. At the emergency room, attempts to remove wax that had dripped from the candle onto her eardrum failed. Surgery was required, and a hole in her eardrum was discovered, which presumably was caused by the procedure. She recovered fully, and luckily her hearing was not affected. The practitioner apologized, compensated the woman, and stopped performing ear coning [4].

    Regulatory Actions
    Candles marketed with health claims are classified by the FDA as medical devices. As such, they are illegal to market without FDA approval, which none of them have. During the past few years, the agency has banned the importation of auricular candles marketed by at least four Canadian companies [5]:

    Europe Cosmetiques, St. Lawrence, Quebec, which had claimed that its products were effective for treating ear wax build-up, hearing problems, sinus congestion, frequent migraines, and ear aches.
    Kencayd Consulting (aka Candela Ear Candles), Victoria, British Columbia, which had claimed that its products promoted better hearing, better lymphatic circulation, and pressure regulation.
    Superior Ear, a division of J&P Holdings, Parson, British Columbia, which had claimed that its products promoted better hearing, better lymphatic circulation, and pressure regulation .
    Purity of Life, Action, Ontario.
    In 1993, the FDA seized about $6,000 worth of candles, components, and brochures from Quality Health Products, of Fayette, Ohio. An FDA summary stated:

    Adulterated - The article is a class III medical device for which no approved premarket approval application is in effect; and, the methods used in, and the facilities and controls used for, its manufacture, packing, and storage are not in conformity with current good manufacturing practice. Misbranded -- The article's labeling represents and suggests that it is adequate and effective for reducing ear wax, fever, and infections associated with a ruptured ear drum, and that it may be used as a replacement for surgical tubes inserted in the ear, which representations and suggestions are contrary to fact. The article's labeling fails to bear adequate directions for use for the purposes for which it is intended. The article is dangerous to health when used in the manner recommended and suggested in the labeling. The article was manufactured, prepared, propagated, compounded, or processed in an establishment not duly registered and was not included in a required list; a notice or other required information was not provided as required prior to its introduction into interstate commerce [6].

    Early in 1998, the FDA ordered the president of Earth Care, of Ukiah, California, to stop marketing the Ear Candles advertised in his company's catalog. The letter noted that the product had been advertised as a "remedy for earaches, sinus headaches, swimmer's ear, allergies, and hearing difficulty effectively removes impurities from the passages by drawing excess wax, yeast, fungus, and bacteria . . . from the sinuses and lymph glands." [7] In September 1998, the agency issued an Import Alert which stated:

    The Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH), has determined that "Ear Candles" are medical devices as defined by Section 201(h) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (The Act). An Ear Candle is a hollow wax cylinder (about ten inches long) intended to remove excess ear wax. This is accomplished by lighting the top of the candle-like product, and allowing it to create a vacuum to draw wax and other impurities from the ear.

    The product labeling is false and misleading in that there is no validated scientific evidence to support the efficacy of the product for its intended use. Also, the label of the product contains inadequate directions for use since adequate directions cannot be written for the product's purported use. CDRH considers the product to be dangerous when used according to its labeling, since the use of a lit candle in the proximity of a person's face would carry a high risk of causing potentially severe skin/hair burns and middle ear damage.

    Additionally, there has been no premarket notification filed (510(k)) for these products and the products appear to have been manufactured in establishments not duly registered or listed with the . . . FDA [8].

    In November 1998, the FDA warned Nature's Way, of West Columbia, South Carolina, that it would be illegal to continue marketing ear candles because they are unapproved devices that would be dangerous to use as suggested in its catalog [9].

    Ear candles cannot be legally sold in Canada. The Medical Devices Regulations of Canada's Food and Drug Act states that medical device of this type must be licensed by Therapeutic Products Programme of Health Canada before the product can be sold. No licenses have been granted for this product. Some promoters, in an attempt to avoid medical device regulations, advertise ear candles as being "for entertainment only". However, Health Canada considers that this product is sold for medical purposes, because there is no other reasonable use for ear candles. Canada has issued directives prohibiting the importation ear candles [10].

    Despite these actions, ear candles are still widely available through the Internet [A, B, C, D] and at health-food stores. The Awareness Institute of Lake Wales, Florida, not only sells products but offers a $75 course leading to "certification as an earconolgist."

    The Bottom Line
    For most people, ear wax moves along the ear canal and eventually makes it to the outside, taking with it any accumulated dirt or other matter. Compacted ear wax should be removed by a physician or other health professional using legitimate instruments. Candling is both ineffective and dangerous.





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  3. #3
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    Thank you for the input

    Quote Originally Posted by gonefishin
    just say no!
    I originally posted this suggestion as a joke, but I was not aware that ear candles could cause damage to ear drumbs. Thanks for pointing out dangers associated with using these devices, here are some more appropriate methods for removing ear wax:

    http://www.doctorhoffman.com/wax.htm

  4. #4
    Forum Regular gonefishin's Avatar
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    sorry about the misunderstanding. Actually, the recommendations for people to use this method seems to pop up from time to time...so it isn't surprising to see it posted here (or on other boards)

    Maybe I'm a little overly sensitive because I've had problems with my ears that could have been serious. Luckily, all worked out well

    take care>>>>>
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by gonefishin
    sorry about the misunderstanding. Actually, the recommendations for people to use this method seems to pop up from time to time...so it isn't surprising to see it posted here (or on other boards)

    Maybe I'm a little overly sensitive because I've had problems with my ears that could have been serious. Luckily, all worked out well

    take care>>>>>

    An easy and simple way to test it:
    Just place it in your cupped hands, if you can stand the heat, and see if suppoed 'earwax' is the byproduct. Of course, no earwax is possible to be sucked out of your palms and am willing to bet that you will get something, the wax in the candle
    Or, you can use a test tube as an ear
    mtrycrafts

  6. #6
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    Maybe when I start my new Hi End audio accessories company (Beckmanshade) I can sell special ear spray that increases the sensitivity of the users ear.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beckman
    Maybe when I start my new Hi End audio accessories company (Beckmanshade) I can sell special ear spray that increases the sensitivity of the users ear.

    Sounds great Just be sure you don't incur any real injury liability
    mtrycrafts

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