Extending outputs

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  • 03-24-2008, 07:48 PM
    PDN
    Hey, check out the Wiremold Power Strip at www.audioconnect.com-online store-power outlets. This is a hospital grade 15 or 20 amp 9 outlet power strip sold by Audio Connection, Verona, NJ. I use these with my PSAudio power ports when I need to plug in more then 2 components. It's not a surge suppressor but simply a high end power strip with no components to impede the current path to your components. Check it out and take a look at all of the items sold at this store. The owner, John Rutan, is a super fellow and owns a great hi-fi store in northern NJ.
  • 03-25-2008, 12:03 AM
    pixelthis
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by basite
    of course, you could do that yourself too, and then save the money spent on the electrician...
    all it takes is a cheap multimeter...

    I've heard lot's of good things from these too:

    http://www.jenving.se/
    their mains blocks aren't too expensive...

    Keep them spinning,
    Bert.


    I saw a book on sale in a grocery store, had a lot of info on wiring your house, putting in a light fixture, etc.
    Only problem is this stuff is DANGEROUS.
    Nobody needs to mess around with electricity unless they know what they are doing.


    AS for lighting strikes your average "lighting strike" is
    three billion electron volts

    If you have a power strip that can withstand THAT please tell me so I can buy one.
    MANUFACTURERS have a 100,000 dollar, etc "guarentee" against failure if you get hit,
    this is marketing, they KNOW theres no way their strip will surrive, but the chance of a hit is so small...:1:
  • 03-25-2008, 02:42 AM
    basite
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by pixelthis
    I saw a book on sale in a grocery store, had a lot of info on wiring your house, putting in a light fixture, etc.
    Only problem is this stuff is DANGEROUS.
    Nobody needs to mess around with electricity unless they know what they are doing.


    AS for lighting strikes your average "lighting strike" is
    three billion electron volts

    If you have a power strip that can withstand THAT please tell me so I can buy one.
    MANUFACTURERS have a 100,000 dollar, etc "guarentee" against failure if you get hit,
    this is marketing, they KNOW theres no way their strip will surrive, but the chance of a hit is so small...:1:


    cooking can be dangerous as well, yet we all cook ourselves, don't we?
    so is driving a car, or bike. Or gardening, or building something.
    what should we do? sit in our chairs and bore ourselves to death?

    with a little care, and indeed 'knowing what you're doing', there shouldn't be a problem at all. my dad has build our house himself, including installing all the electricity stuff, he ain't an electrician, in fact, he doesn't like doing that at all. But guess what, he's still alive and well, nothing ever happened to him.

    there has never been an electrician here, and yet we never had any problems at all.

    oh, and a monster power center should be able to handle the lightning strike, once read someone's experience (I even think it was here on AR), that his house was hit by a lightning strike. Luckily he had the monster thing, and his home theatre survived it. The monster thing died, due to a production fault, but he was given a new one FOR FREE.

    a PS audio power plant should also withstand a lightning strike, so will an Isotek.

    Keep them spinning,
    Bert.
  • 03-25-2008, 02:44 PM
    hermanv
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by basite
    oh, and a monster power center should be able to handle the lightning strike, once read someone's experience (I even think it was here on AR), that his house was hit by a lightning strike. Luckily he had the monster thing, and his home theatre survived it. The monster thing died, due to a production fault, but he was given a new one FOR FREE.

    a PS audio power plant should also withstand a lightning strike, so will an Isotek.

    Keep them spinning,
    Bert.

    To survive a lightning strike both primary and secondary protection is needed. Primary protection is a lightning rod, a good Earth ground and probably heavy duty surge suppressors in your main electric distribution panel. The lightning rod people will tell you to run a #6 or bigger wire to the ground post, this is about 3 times bigger than the surge suppressor power cord or the house wiring ground. The peak currents from a strike are 10,000 Amps or more, and is why a power strip can't do the job. The 16 gauge power cord or the internal house ground wire is just not up to the task. Those surge suppressors are called secondary protection. Anyone who survived a strike with only a "standard" secondary surge suppressor was mainly lucky.

    I have a microwave oven, a series of timers on coffee pots and stoves a TV set and a host of other electronic devices. Chances are so do you. We don't put surge suppressors on every device because it's not really necessary. Yes the stereo cost more, but many surge suppressors do as much harm to sound quality as they do good for the smaller surges.

    So if you have a large financial investment in your system and you wish to protect it from lightning, get some high current surge suppressors installed in your distribution panel. If you live in a lightning prone area, get a lightning rod. After all that, a surge protection power strip will be up to the task.

    Many surge suppressors are rated in Joules, this sounds real scientific. 1 Joule is one watt second which is easier to understand, but doesn't sound as good to the marketing guys. So if your box was rated at 6,000 Joules, in theory it could handle 5,000 amps for 1.2 seconds.
  • 03-26-2008, 01:03 AM
    pixelthis
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by basite
    cooking can be dangerous as well, yet we all cook ourselves, don't we?
    so is driving a car, or bike. Or gardening, or building something.
    what should we do? sit in our chairs and bore ourselves to death?

    with a little care, and indeed 'knowing what you're doing', there shouldn't be a problem at all. my dad has build our house himself, including installing all the electricity stuff, he ain't an electrician, in fact, he doesn't like doing that at all. But guess what, he's still alive and well, nothing ever happened to him.

    there has never been an electrician here, and yet we never had any problems at all.

    oh, and a monster power center should be able to handle the lightning strike, once read someone's experience (I even think it was here on AR), that his house was hit by a lightning strike. Luckily he had the monster thing, and his home theatre survived it. The monster thing died, due to a production fault, but he was given a new one FOR FREE.

    a PS audio power plant should also withstand a lightning strike, so will an Isotek.

    Keep them spinning,
    Bert.

    You dont "know" what kind of quality job your father did...
    BECAUSE YOU ARENT AN ELECTRICIAN.
    I bought a house in 2003, one of the stipulations was that an electrician be paid to fix
    all of the crap that the amateur did to it when he remodeled the house.
    I needed a new box, the ground didnt exist(at all) and half of the plugs didnt work.
    AND yes other forms of endevour are "dangerous" but electricity is in a league
    of its own.
    Get 10,000 volts and thats IT, you wont make it to the hospital.
    THE 30,000 volts in a crt tv set is surrvivable because that current is created by trading off amps.
    The reason a 12 volt car battery hurts so much is that most have 400 to 600 amps.
    And when you hit a powerline you not only get 10,000 volts, you get however many amps that are going through at the time
    the fact that you and your family surrived yours fathers guesswork wiring job is
    proof that god looks over idiots.
    How about open heart surgery? Ever try any of that?:1:
  • 03-26-2008, 01:08 AM
    pixelthis
    One little story, I used to work in an airport.
    THE SMALL PLANES in the commuter line used APC power units to get cranked.
    These were plugged into 250 volt outlets with 50 amps of current.
    A worker there, on a dare , stuck a SCREWDRIVER into one one day, melted
    the damn thing, and damn near melted HIM , and he was holding a plastic handle,
    but it was damp from dew, and thats ALL it took.:1:
  • 03-26-2008, 03:13 AM
    basite
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by pixelthis
    You dont "know" what kind of quality job your father did...
    BECAUSE YOU ARENT AN ELECTRICIAN.
    I bought a house in 2003, one of the stipulations was that an electrician be paid to fix
    all of the crap that the amateur did to it when he remodeled the house.
    I needed a new box, the ground didnt exist(at all) and half of the plugs didnt work.
    AND yes other forms of endevour are "dangerous" but electricity is in a league
    of its own.
    Get 10,000 volts and thats IT, you wont make it to the hospital.
    THE 30,000 volts in a crt tv set is surrvivable because that current is created by trading off amps.
    The reason a 12 volt car battery hurts so much is that most have 400 to 600 amps.
    And when you hit a powerline you not only get 10,000 volts, you get however many amps that are going through at the time
    the fact that you and your family surrived yours fathers guesswork wiring job is
    proof that god looks over idiots.
    How about open heart surgery? Ever try any of that?:1:


    I know that I know better than you what my father did.

    No, I'm not an electrician, but I do know quite alot about it. Saying my dad's 'guesswork' is amateurish is pure nonsense, maybe you are to stupid to realize that people can do more than what they're trained for, but I certainly am not. My dad studied electro mechanics, so he does know 'a little' about electronics.

    when I hear all the people here telling about how crappy their electricity is, and that they hear 'noise' through their stereo when the daughter is using her hairdryer in the bathroom I ask myself if there actually is someone in the entire USA that even deserves the title of 'electrician'. We've never had that problem here! Ever!
    The fuses never jump here unless there is a good reason for it (like a short circuit, caused by mom's steaming iron, because that broke down, but she has a new one now, so that's not a problem too anymore...)

    I guess that proves that my father happens to do a better job than some of the electricians there.

    and you don't need to tell me that a car battery is dangerous because it puts out 400-600 amperes, I ALREADY KNOW THAT. I LEARN STUFF TOO.

    But hey, I can't blame you, morons like you keep the economy alive, because you're so afraid to do something yourself that you need someone else to do it for you. 'god' should better look after you...

    Keep them spinning,
    Bert.
  • 03-26-2008, 04:01 AM
    Brett A
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by pixelthis
    You dont "know" what kind of quality job your father did...BECAUSE YOU ARENT AN ELECTRICIAN.

    Just because electricity is dangerous, doesn't mean every non-electrician in proximity to it is an idiot.

    If you are truly safety minded, careful, and thorough, you can do your own basic home wiring projects. Once you educate yourself of the science, materials, and codes, it's really very easy.

    I ran a dedicated circuit for my system. (as well as a few other similar projects.) Before I did any work in my house, I spent about a month reading and asking questions of my electrician friend.

    I ran a 20amp circuit with one commercial duplex outlet to its own breaker ---all for about $30 and two hours of my time. The difference to the sound was noticeable and an important improvement.
  • 03-26-2008, 09:47 AM
    blackraven
    Hmm, I guess I'm a walking dead person because I got Zapped by a 50,000 volt ignition coil back in 1979 when I use to Hot Rod volkswagon beetles. Its amperage that kills although high voltage can kill as well. And people do survive lightening strikes occasionaly, as I've taken care of a few patients in my 22yrs as an emergency medicine physician. Hell, Lee Trevino the Senior Pro Golfer was struck twice by lightening and survived.

    And Basite, I agree with you about hearing noise from the hair dryer. I'm not saying it cant happen, but in all my years of not using an RF and EFI filter, I have never heard any noise from other electrical equipment and niether have any of my friends who are into audio.
  • 03-26-2008, 10:07 AM
    Luvin Da Blues
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by pixelthis
    The reason a 12 volt car battery hurts so much is that most have 400 to 600 amps.
    And when you hit a powerline you not only get 10,000 volts, you get however many amps that are going through at the time


    Here we go again, just 'cause a battery can output 400-600 amps doesn't mean it does all the time. It is all dependent on the load presented to the circuit. Does your car radio use 400 amps, the headlamps?? If you hit a power line you are NOT going to get all the current that is in the power line only what your body will allow to pass with 10,000 volts, this will be less with a lesser voltage and visa versa, if this is 5milliamps or more it's gunna hurt or even kill. That's why they set GFCI receptacles at 5 milliamps

    And yes, I am an electrician, have been for over 20 years.
  • 03-26-2008, 10:12 AM
    Luvin Da Blues
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Brett A
    Just because electricity is dangerous, doesn't mean every non-electrician in proximity to it is an idiot.

    If you are truly safety minded, careful, and thorough, you can do your own basic home wiring projects. Once you educate yourself of the science, materials, and codes, it's really very easy.

    I ran a dedicated circuit for my system. (as well as a few other similar projects.) Before I did any work in my house, I spent about a month reading and asking questions of my electrician friend.

    I ran a 20amp circuit with one commercial duplex outlet to its own breaker ---all for about $30 and two hours of my time. The difference to the sound was noticeable and an important improvement.

    Yep, residential wiring is about as basic as you can get. There is no reason anyone with half a brain can't do their own electrical work if they learn a little first and take their time to do it right. There are numerous instructional books and videos for homeowners.