Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 34
  1. #1
    Forum Regular Brainstorm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Bournemouth, Dorset, United Kingdom
    Posts
    195

    Smile Best THX moments in the cinema

    Tell me about the best THX cinema that you have attended in the past, I’d like to hear feedback of the practical THX cinema the type of film presentation be it Dolby stereo A, SR type 70mm Dolby stereo, dts, and SDDS 8 or even the CDS that was retired very early during the dawn of the digital sound age of the early 1990’s.

    Tell you what I’ll start of with one of the finest THX cinemas in the whole wide land of the United Kingdom if not the word.

    Empire was one of the first THX cinemas I attended during 1989 though to 1995 and 2000 which at the time the THX licence was dropped but Empire is now back, or should I say The Empire Strikes Back with a bruit force of THX JBL sound power of 56KW!!!

    Having seeing Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade at the Empire in 70mm six-track Dolby stereo SR THX sound system where the lows where lower the highs higher and surround that was totally surrounding the large auditorium with some 22 JBL 8330 five-screen array consisting of JBL 4675-A and sub bass array of x8 JBL 4645 one things for sure the Empire is a tough act to beat even by home cinema standards.


    Hears the little tramp Charlie Chaplin standing outside the Empire



    Hears a closer view of the columns outside the Empire

    The grandness of the architecture shows that this is place wait until you see the inside.



    The sound is frigging awesome I Kidd you not, I've been there several times, sick around I'll be posting for quite a while.

    This is a night time view of the of the neon lighting outside the Empire



    This image was taken around 1991 at the premiere of Backdraft.

    Backdaft was presented in 70mm six-track Dolby Stereo via the Lucasfilm THX sound system.



    This image was taken around 1991 at the premiere of Backdraft note star William Baldwin in the background.



    How do you like the show so far boys & girls!

    View of the front lobby of the Empire



    Grab that ticket and start running towards Empire Screen #1.



    The cinema was refurbished in 1989 with a makeover cost around if memory severs me right £5 million pounds.

    You can clearly see the money was well spent and put to very good use in the refurbishments.



    While waiting to getting seated in the Empire's plush red rocker chairs and be surrounded with the delights of 70mm Dolby Stereo or Dolby Digital, dts SDDS and THX, relax with a drink at the bar.



    This view shows "The Bodyguard" which was played at the Empire back in 1992 thou the Empire normally shows "Paramount and Universal" films the Empire took it on to show the "The Bodyguard" as the former "Warner West End" cinema was been refurbished herself at a grand cost around £20 million there about.



    A different angle hear shows the doors to Empire screen #1 were getting closer now we are!

    The clock is ticking in the background and Cal is mad as hell.

  2. #2
    Forum Regular Brainstorm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Bournemouth, Dorset, United Kingdom
    Posts
    195

    Smile



    WOW!!! I told you, this was voted the number cinema event in the world around the late 1980s not sure if she still holds that status, but in my view this is one hell of impressive cinema, the first time I saw a film hear was "Indiana Jones and the last Crusade" 70mm six-track Dolby Stereo SR with Split-Surrounds via the Lucasfilm THX Sound System.

    The force of high power sound via some 20 JBL 4675-A 15inc bass mid arranged in the five screen array five horns placed above the bass cabs for the mid high frequencies for Dolby formats 42 and 43 / 70mm six-track, some 8 JBL 4645 these subs go below the most lowest of rumbling of soundtracks.

    Note the surrounds JBL 8330 can be seen though not clearly as they blend in very well into the auditoriums design, look carefully.



    The dimming of the auditoriums lights gives it a different view, note above the screen the stars these twinkle back a throw, it is said upon the premiere of "Forrest Gump" back in 1994 they where put to startling use as "Alan Silvestri" opening score with that gentleness in the music really gave the film a smashing impact.



    This side view of the Empire auditorium, note the plumb plushest red rocker chairs.

    It's also said that "James Cameron" raved about the cinemas sound system upon the premiere of "Titanic" 1997 where it played exclusively in dts 70mm THX Sound System, as the best he's ever heard.



    Aspect ratio set on the screen to, W/S 1.85:1 though I've only seen one film at the Empire in W/S which was "Alive" Dolby Stereo Digital THX, the rest in Scope 2.35:1 and a handful of Star Trek films like the Star Trek day on Sunday 8th October 1989 all five films presented in 70mm Six-Track Dolby Stereo THX sound, except Star Trek the Motion Picture which was shown in Scope 2.35:1 Dolby Stereo A type.



    This view showing a closer look of the red rockers, with the back part and the bottom part all movable for a rocking film show, and you them in this cinema, because when Indiana Jones throws a punch it will knock back into the chair LOL it's that good a film when I saw it there on September 13th 1989 Wednesday, and at £6.00 quid.



    Upon my third attendance to the Empire Leicester Square, when I was working as a projectionist for UCI cinemas in Dorset 10 screen multiplex Tower Park, I met, Ilker Sherif' chief projectionists of the Empire back then, his now moved onwards but there's still someone there to run the shows to spectacular event levels.

    Ilker' was kind to show me the booth which I must say is the heart of the machine, note the Philips DP 70 dual projectors 35 & 70mm capabilities these projectors won an academy award for technical excellence.

    Note the cake plates these can hold up to a three hour feature film, something like "Lawrence of Arabia" would require two cake plates, note the bottom plate this can be rewound onto the middle cake plate or the top one, re-lacing the film back up takes only a few minutes at the most.



    Closer view of the Philips DP 70, note the rectifiers placed behind the projectors, these power up the powerful Xenon lamps inside the projectors lamp house, in the old days carbon arc rods where used where the two rods come together and create an electrical charged bright light, much in the same way as arc welding, is done except where showing films.



    Closer view of the print on the cake plate, note in the centre there is a mechanism this is called the feeder or the Brain the film is treaded though and past the little rollers and though the finger and then around a set of rollers up down up and around and onto the projector and back to the cake plate, then
    lacing the projector up and start.




    Holy cow now that's a rack system with some 15 JBL uri 6290 amplifiers or around 30 amplifiers for the JBL sound system placed to the right sides of and taking up three rack two & half rack framing, in the last two rakes placed to the left side, note two frames above JBL 6290 amps, is the Lucasfilm THX 3417 crossover monitor sound system, above that is a dual tape deck and above that a CD deck this is used for none sync music, that you hear coming from the front left and right stereo JBL in the auditorium.

    Next to that is the Dolby DA-10 Dolby Digital processor below that is the Dolby CP-200 processor with multiple 27 band 1/3 octave EQ for left centre right split-surrounds left centre and right centre screen channels, and Dolby A type NR this is regarded as a fine Dolby processor within the industry, also in the racking is a Dolby SR type module for Dolby SR type prints found on all 35mm prints to day SR-D as there so called.

    With around 15Kw of sound power you can imagine what "Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade" must have sounded like, as well as Star Trek, totally out of this world I swear.


    The clock is ticking in the background and Cal is mad as hell.

  3. #3
    Forum Regular Brainstorm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Bournemouth, Dorset, United Kingdom
    Posts
    195

    Smile

    A different angle showing the awesome mighty powerful, note in this picture placed below the THX 3417 crossover monitor is a dts CD-Rom drive and decoder.



    The Empire as a few surprises up it's sleeve with a laser show presented before each running of the show, it's used to fantastic effect which is played along with a high tech fast tempo musical piece, which last for around 60 seconds, though today it's not used well at least the last time I saw it operating was back in 1995, well Id be very surprised to know it back up and running.

    As this played some funky Star Trek images played over the screen and around the auditorium walls with U.S.S. Enterprise attacking a Klingon bird of Pray LOL that was exciting, then the lights dimmed the music faded and moderately the music started up and grandly pressing on you body Star Trek 3 was a real kicker.



    The newly refitted, Empire with enough firepower to destroy an entire planet.




    Quote
    Empire Cinemas Limited knew they had a task on their hands when they assumed responsibility for the Empire cinema, in London’s Leicester Square. Once the flagship cinema of the UCI chain, and the venue for many European film premieres in the past, the theatre was sorely in need of a refit; its once state-of-the-art surround sound system was outdated, and it had lost its THX licence, the Lucasfilm sound specification seen by many as the ‘gold standard’ for cinema sound. When the newly formed Empire Cinemas group took over the venue in late 2005, they knew that they wanted to return the cinema to its former glories — and surpass them. And they wanted that THX licence back. So they turned to some of the best names in cinema sound to help them. The completed installation, a custom-built system assembled with the help of the Harman Group and renowned London-based cinema installation specialists Bell Theatre Services, includes an impressive array of Harman Group equipment. There are Crown power amps, dbx DriveRack 4800 processors, and JBL custom ScreenArray™ speakers containing technology for which JBL engineers received the Technical Achievement Award from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Everything is networked with CobraNet™ technology, and managed using Harman’s proprietary HiQNet™ control protocol.

    The involvement of JBL is no surprise to anyone familiar with the history of cinema sound; some of the earliest products developed by company founder James B Lansing over 70 years ago were cinema loudspeakers, and sixty percent of cinema speakers sold today worldwide are made by JBL. Indeed, the former sound system at the Empire was built around JBL speakers, which is what led the Empire’s new management to contact Harman Pro UK, the British arm of JBL’s parent group. And Max Bell, Managing Director of Bell Theatre Services, was only too happy with Empire’s choice. “We’ve always used JBL speakers”, says Bell. “For me, they’re the best on the market — and JBL are still the only speaker company that has a proper research division, which means their products are always improving. We’ve always had a close relationship with Crown International, too — we specify a lot of JBL/Crown systems.”

    One of the reasons Empire Cinemas took on Bell Theatre was that the latter have had a long association with the venue — Bell had carried out the Empire’s previous refit, back in 1988. And Empire were sparing no expense this time around, as André Mort, Technical Manager at Empire Cinemas Limited, explains: "As a new organisation within the UK cinema industry, we wanted to show that only the best would do for such an important venue." "They said ‘Go for it. This is our flagship; we want the best’," adds Max Bell. "So that’s what we gave them".

    The refurbishment, which reportedly cost a six-figure sum, involved enlarging the projection screen to dimensions of 18.2 by 7.68 metres, reconstructing and acoustically treating the space behind the screen and rebuilding the THX baffle wall, and completely revamping the cinema’s sound system. The completed setup comprises a Dolby CP650 digital processor, five newly THX-certified 96kHz-capable dbx 4800 DriveRack processors to manage the loudspeaker channels and handle delay compensation in the auditorium, and the power amplifiers: 13 CTs 3000s, six CTs 8200s, and five Crown CTs 2000s. This range of amps drives the generous complement of 16 JBL 4645C 18-inch subwoofers and 42 JBL 8340A surround speakers (each of which has a dedicated amp channel), as well as the five JBL Custom ScreenArray™ 5632 full-range, four-way speakers, which handle the Left, inner Left, Centre, inner Right, and Right channels. Everything is managed via Harman’s HiQNet™ digital control protocol from a PC in the projector room.

    In keeping with their usual hands-on approach, Harman closely assisted Bell Theatre as the refit proceeded, providing advice on system design and configuration and ensuring the equipment arrived on time. This was a particularly important role, given that the entire refit had to be completed in just two weeks, before the start of the important summer blockbuster season. As the project neared its end, Harman also sent Mark Bailey of JBL’s European Technical Support team to help fine-tune the finished auditorium’s acoustics.

    With the work complete, the reopened Empire is now capable of an earth-trembling combined sound output of 56kW — a great improvement over its former 13kW best. And of course, the THX certification is now firmly back on the cinema’s wall. The only element remaining from the original installation is a Dolby CP200 analogue processor, which has been retained for those occasions when the cinema wishes to screen restored 70mm analogue prints. Thus the Empire is now capable of handling the best in analogue and digital formats, as befits a top-flight London cinema. “I’ve been involved with The Empire for many years,” comments André Mort, “and the performance of the new system has greatly exceeded my expectations.”

    Dave Budge of Harman Pro UK comments, “It’s a pleasure to be involved with Empire Cinemas, who have committed to this considerable investment in the name of making the cinema experience at the Empire truly memorable.”
    Quote







    The spec as follows:-

    Dolby CP650SD (10 channel AES/EBU Output Studio version)
    Dolby CP200/DA20/MPU-1/SA10 retained for 70mm magnetic and backup replay. CP200 Modified with CAT 64B EQ cards removed for lower noise operation.
    2x SDDS DFP2000 (One main, one backup)

    5x DBX4800 24bit/96Khz Loudspeaker Management Systems with HiQNET Control. Digital Feed from CP650, Analogue Feed from CP200/SDDS.

    5x JBL Custom Screen Array each fed by 1x Crown CTs2000 and 1x Crown CTs3000 Amplifiers

    16x JBL 4645C Sub Bass fed by 8x Crown CTs 3000 Amplifiers

    42x JBL 8340A Surround Loudspeakers individually driven and time-aligned from 6x Crown CTs8200 8-Channel Amplifiers

    Total System Power 56kW

    The system now carries THX license

    Screen size has now been increased to a maximum 18.26x8.14m

    The clock is ticking in the background and Cal is mad as hell.

  4. #4
    I took a headstart... basite's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Mortsel, Antwerp, Belgium, Europe, Earth
    Posts
    3,056
    ...



    ...

    there are no words for it,
    it's enormous, it's beautiful, it's very very nice, that's very much power...

    I think this puts any other cinema to shame...

    Keep them spinning,
    Bert.
    Life is music!

    Mcintosh MA6400 Integrated
    Double Advent speakers
    Thiel CS2.3's
    *DIY Lenco L75 TT
    * SME 3012 S2
    * Rega RB-301
    *Denon DL-103 in midas body
    *Denon DL-304
    *Graham slee elevator EXP & revelation
    *Lehmann audio black cube SE
    Marantz CD5001 OSE
    MIT AVt 2 IC's
    Sonic link Black earth IC's
    Siltech MXT New york IC's
    Kimber 4VS speakercable
    Furutech powercord and plugs.

    I'm a happy 20 year old...

  5. #5
    Forum Regular Brainstorm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Bournemouth, Dorset, United Kingdom
    Posts
    195
    Quote Originally Posted by basite
    ...



    ...

    there are no words for it,
    it's enormous, it's beautiful, it's very very nice, that's very much power...

    I think this puts any other cinema to shame...

    Keep them spinning,
    Bert.
    Unquestionably, that it is, she’s quite untouchable.

    You can stop drooling now. I guess you’re getting a hunger to visit the Empire, Indiana Jones will be playing there in 2008, and cross my fingers who knows they might do all four for one day only?

    The Empire is full of lots of surprises…

    The clock is ticking in the background and Cal is mad as hell.

  6. #6
    Forum Regular anamorphic96's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    538
    The Pacific Cinerama Dome in Hollywood is on par with this theater. It has 44 surrounds and 12 JBL 4645's but is also slightly smaller. Mann's Chinese and Pacifics El Capitan are also on par in presentation quality. We should not also forget the AMPAS theater.

    I have spoken with a couple of technicians who have watched movies at the Empire and feel it's impressive but not the holy grail of theaters. The Empire get's the sub bass system correct in that they use a proper amount of subs. But feel the stage system could have used double stacked bass bin's.

    Thanks for the pics though. Hopefully this will help some members appreciate how good a cinema can still be and that all places are not like your typical multiplex. Film is still superior to all digital formats when properly presented.

  7. #7
    Forum Regular
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Margate, Florida
    Posts
    614
    Brainstorm; I think this is the best post that anybody has ever made on the audioreview site here. You have given the members of audioreview a tremendous insight that is nothing less than a phenomenon of a movie theater that I doubt few knew even existed including myself.

    During the 1980s, Fox opened up a few THX multi-cinemas in the S. Florida area. I saw three pictures in those theaters which I will discuss shortly. I never heard any great sub-woofer type bass in these theaters. The left and right walls had 4 speakers each. The back wall had 4 speakers. They looked like some kind of three-way jobs that were inverted, that is that the woofer was on top and the tweeter was on the bottom. This was however in one of the theaters, one of the other's I am not too sure what they had. Up front, I could hear left, center and right stereo sound.

    THE LIVING DAYLIGHTS---The audio was stunning on this film , particulaly the battle scene near the end of this movie. The whole theater was engulfed in surround sound with bullets and explosions coming from a multitude of points around the theater. In the early part of the film, one see's a cable car approaching and I could actually hear that car pass me by as smooth as silk as the 4 right side speakers handled the action so perfectly as in real life.

    I was using a simple passive surroud sound circuit based on Dynaquad. After seeing this movie, I wanted to see if I could make a version of this THX that I heard in that theater. I did create a passive 5.0 channel system that created stereo separation in the surrounds based on a Dynaquad circuit and powered by a NAD receiver. I eventually listened to THE LIVING DAYLIGHTS at home on this configuration. The cable car did pass me by on my right rear speaker but it was not as dramatic as the 4 speakers in the theater that handled that particular sound effect. The same with the battle scene but only because of the lack of a multitude speaker set-up for the home which would have been impossible to do. However, the circuit on its own merit was fantastic.

    INDIANA JONES AND THE LAST CRUSADE---A THX theater is only as good as it is properly calibrated. I do not think this theater was becuase the surround sound seemed so one sided to one side of the theater. I have this movie on Laserdisc. Those sections that have good surround sound in this movie to play well but overall this movie is not a surround sound wonder. The dvds of these films as far as the audio goes are worthless with the so called 5.1 sound that they have on them.

    STAR TREK V---I only heard one instance with a space ship flying over my head to the rear speakers in the theater. Again, I do not think the theater was adjusted properly. I also do not think that this movie is any wonder in the surround sound area either, though the film is very entertaining.

    STAR TREK 3---I did not see that in the theater. It was the first movie on Laserdisc that had digital sound. The digital sound left alot to be desired. The analog track was fine. There is alot of surround sound in this movie particulaly near the end. Played great on my dynaquad system with its analogue track.

  8. #8
    Forum Regular Brainstorm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Bournemouth, Dorset, United Kingdom
    Posts
    195
    Quote Originally Posted by anamorphic96
    The Pacific Cinerama Dome in Hollywood is on par with this theater. It has 44 surrounds and 12 JBL 4645's but is also slightly smaller. Mann's Chinese and Pacifics El Capitan are also on par in presentation quality. We should not also forget the AMPAS theater.

    I have spoken with a couple of technicians who have watched movies at the Empire and feel it's impressive but not the holy grail of theaters. The Empire get's the sub bass system correct in that they use a proper amount of subs. But feel the stage system could have used double stacked bass bin's.

    Thanks for the pics though. Hopefully this will help some members appreciate how good a cinema can still be and that all places are not like your typical multiplex. Film is still superior to all digital formats when properly presented.
    That’s what I was thinking about the screen channels they should have used x2 JBL 4642 for that set-up. But I’m sure it will be quite impressive when I get around to popping up to London soon!!

    AMPAS doses have impressive JBL array the 5000 series I believe? Unless they have changed it.

    Manns Chinese theatre in Hollywood looks like it would go beyond what (((Sensurround))) did there back in 1974 with a net above the audience, LOL now that is a good marketing campaign, the cinema in my home town didn’t use a net to catch fallen objects it sounded like the ceiling was going to give!

    One thing I’ve noticed with THX professional is total assurance of the sound quality and picture as well, the home is different matter where we don’t have the large rooms we wish we had and that loudspeakers are smaller but it does come remarkable close.

    Please multiplexes I’ve worked in two of those many years ago and what disappointment, but the loudspeakers will still eat home cinema alive, they just don’t have them pushed to the limits of what a grand THX set-up will do in the cinema.

    The clock is ticking in the background and Cal is mad as hell.

  9. #9
    Forum Regular anamorphic96's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    538
    One thing I forgot to mention is that in Hollywood we have the Arclight multiplex behind the Cinerama Dome. It is 14 screens and all THX certified. It presents movies exactly how they where supposed to be seen and heard. The sound systems are tweaked to within an inch of there life and sound better than any multiplex I have been in. The picture quality is crystal clear and perfectly focused with a proper light level of 16fl at all times. This is the only theatre I have been in that offers the TRUE THX experience. It is a union operated booth that is getting constant service from Dolby and other technicians to make sure things are tip top all the time.

    On another note you might not be aware of. Klipsch is actually making a HUGE dent in the cinema market with there speakers. They are extremely impressive and account for over 60 percent of all new installs in the US. They actually outperform JBL at this point. Especially with there sub bass systems. On the installs we have been doing we are getting a flat response all the way down to 18hz . Klipsch recommends placing there subs in the corners of the baffle walls. One end has the regular subs and the other end has the ultra low subs that extend to 18hz. They are the only company I know of using 4 way systems behind the screen as well.

    You should check out there website at Klipsch.com under the pro section.

  10. #10
    Forum Regular Brainstorm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Bournemouth, Dorset, United Kingdom
    Posts
    195
    kelsci


    You lucky devil, The Living Daylights was realised in optical Dolby stereo A type during 1987, no 70mm prints where made, except the brilliant Graham V. Hartstone did on the Dolby mix.

    Fair play to mate looks like you’ve been hooked slightly longer than I.

    Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade 70mm six-track Dolby stereo SR was WOW nothing but total WOW! I have never felt or heard such clear and easy dialogue along with loads of dialogue panning moving around the screen and surrounds that made my look behind when the German airplane fly’s off screen down the right side surrounds and over to a phantom surround and then heard on the left side array WOW!

    So much detail I can talk about this film so much.

    All Star Trek films at the Empire from Star Trek The Motion Picture Dolby Stereo A type sounded like nothing I heard before the (wormhole) had me moving from side to side with a high frequency sounds appearing to move around the cinema, and granted I was sat where the sound engineers calibrate the cinema it was out of this world.

    I also have the film of NTSC laserdisc where I transferred it to DVD-RW and belaive it or not it gets played more than the directors cut, surrounds on the opening where a Klingon battle cruiser fires a photon torpedo comes from behind with a blast in the room, just like it did in the Empire.

    Star Trek II The Wrath of Khan 70mm six-track Dolby Stereo A type was fantastic, with each film playing during Sunday October 8th 1989 it just got more dynamic feeling Kahn lifting Chekov off the floor got my attention WOW! Now that’s a sound system that reproduced even the tiniest of sounds even during quite moments.

    The attack on the U.S.S. Enterprise was a like some slamming there hand on my chest! Threatening it was “threatening” and very realistic I found myself looking around the cinema during the confusion and focusing to pin point screen channel sound.

    When Genesis exploded it felt like the floor was going to give way! Even the James Horner score was hard hitting towards the end where each instrument was felt with deep depth magical, truly magical.

    Star Trek III The Search for Spock 70mm six-track Dolby stereo A type, was even more deeper that Star Trek II, the opening alone was very moving, it had warmth and rich energy coming from the screen array. Mind you its magic is partly to do with the THX baffle wall and the THX 3417 crossover. When the Klingon bird of pray blew that small spaceship up dear god it erupted big time debars was flying all over the surrounds and while ducking thinking something gone crash into me made it all the more believable.

    Hearing voices over the surrounds when Enterprise was docking was very neat I was looking above me as too see where the voices where coming from with such clear detail, this happened a few times in the film.

    Leaving the space dock or more rather stealing the Enterprise without orders was thrilling that James Horner score was pounding me in the chest and going down very deep. When space dock doors opened it was like WHAM! Feeling Enterprise going from impulse power to warp speed jolted the Empire I Kidd you not while streaming down the right surround arrays!

    When poor ole Enterprise was a dead stick floating in space with no option to destroy her, and when that ship went up it was like some just kicked me in the face!

    When the planet finally gave it was HUGE, but feeling captain Kirk kicking Kruge, in the face with the cinema applauding “I have had enough of you” YEAH!!!

    So when the planet exploded it was like nothing I felt before!

    Star Trek IV The Voyage Home 70mm six-track Dolby stereo SR type was a chill out film was lots of humour and plenty of surprises. When the Bird of pray was travailing towards the sun, mad if you say, that I was on the edge of my seat gripping the rocker chair as if I where riding along with them, vibrations where pounding and when she passed down the surrounds with a leap of courage and faith was moving.

    Towards the end when we see Enterprise the music by Leonard Rosenman just slammed straight into me, with Enterprise finally blasting off into warp speed made the cinema rock!

    Oh note that there was print damage on the film with a brief 15 seconds there about where the mag tracks where muted due to flaking I guess of the oxide coating.

    Star Trek V The Final Frontier 70mm six-track Dolby stereo SR It was the first film that used the THX (Cimarron) was used in 70mm six-track Dolby stereo just pashed me back in the seat with force!

    Jerry Goldsmith one of the finest film score composers bless him, just liked slamming the score into the audience. Sound effects and dialogue panning lots of “dialogue panning” was going on in this mix.

    Cape Fear 35mm Dolby stereo SR wow I sat right at the very front for this and Max Caddy was most defiantly off his trolley, granted I missed around 3/4of the film and was in Leicester square that day I managed to get in for free, courtesy for projectionists who have worked for UCI in the past.

    Depth was great on this with sub bass extension, I liked the moment where Max was face to face with three guys each punch just knocked me back in the rocker as I’m naturally very jumpy wow, even when Sam Bowden dropped the anchor into the water it was SLAM with depth when it hit the bottom.

    The standoff was chilling with each one slugging it out in the mud and lobbing rocks that was felt in the chest!

    Star Trek VI The Undiscovered Country 70mm six-track Dolby stereo SR type, now this was the last 70mm presentation I saw at the Empire and one of the best along with Star Trek II and IV, the warmness from the fronts juts had me looking downwards towards the fronts while the choir made me look upwards.

    I must have saw Star Trek IV three times that day while having a chat with the chief projectionist at the site Ilker Sherif' you could feel the shockwave from the opening in the coffee room next to the projection booth we both laughed out loud.

    Empire even had a backup 35mm Dolby stereo SR print of Star Trek IV for some other purpose I doubt it was for screen 2, could have been after the 70mm exclusive presentation was over in screen 1.

    Alive 35mm Dolby stereo SR-D the opening had clear dialogue and hearing the airplane move over the right side surrounds towards the fronts was remarkable I’d never had believed it possible to get six-track Dolby stereo onto 35mm film, which is a huge saving in costs as 70mm prints cost around £16.000 over a second hand 35mm print £1.500.

    Timecop 35mm dts sounded great when travelling though time Foley body punches just kicked with bruit impact.

    Gladiator 35mm Dolby stereo SR-D lacked the total signature THX impact due to the THX licence being dropped around a year and half before, and the Martin Audio loudspeakers wasn’t winning my applaud one way of the other. Still it had some impact but it just wasn’t JBL.

    anamorphic96

    (Klipsch) I’ve heard of the name and seen the home cinema loudspeakers. I’ll have a look at the site thanks mate.

    18Hz seems good enough for deep extension of the sub bass array. Some screens do place the sub bass arrays spaced below the screen channels to give greater depth.

    But after seeing the Empire JBL 4645C array 13 feet wide and 8 feet high, that would seriously damage a home with structural damage, you know roof tiles dropping off get the picture!

    The clock is ticking in the background and Cal is mad as hell.

  11. #11
    Forum Regular anamorphic96's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    538
    [/IMG]

    This is a pic of the Klipsch 10.2 system created at a Malco theater in Tennesse. Over 60,000 watts and capable of extension to 17hz.

    Here is another link with more info.
    http://www.klipsch.com/news-center/f...h-klipsch.aspx

  12. #12
    Forum Regular Brainstorm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Bournemouth, Dorset, United Kingdom
    Posts
    195
    anamorphic96

    Holy Markel I thought I’d seen a few THX installations this tops it!

    LOL you sure that ain’t an IMAX screen granted the width is less. Very impressive I’m already getting ideas. WOW!



    I can see the mid range and high range and what appears horn loaded bass cab for each of the five-screen array the sub bass array and extra top or height to give dimension to the sound like in real life.

    The clock is ticking in the background and Cal is mad as hell.

  13. #13
    Forum Regular anamorphic96's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    538
    I was suspicious at first about Klipsch in the commercial cinema market but after installing and spending alot of time listening to Klipsch systems I can understand why we sell so much of there equipment and why they account for so many of the new installs. I am convinced they are the leader in commercial cinema loudspeakers. JBL is good stuff but Klipsch is a cut above.

    Regal, Malco, Harkins, and Krikorian all use Klipsch exclusively. I will be working on a new install starting on 2-26 in Arizona so I will take some pics and post them when I get back.

  14. #14
    Forum Regular Brainstorm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Bournemouth, Dorset, United Kingdom
    Posts
    195
    Looking forwards to seeing them here JBL has been around 80 years now and still going strong. But after seeing this set-up, dear lord. I’ve toyed around with some films like Goldeeye and Apollo 13 with a what I call an upper height centre channel that gets its source signal from the left and right or centre phantom. When passed though a Dolby pro-logic processor certain types of sound effects of dialogue that is sent to left and right in-phase really gives the film a different approach in the home.

    But 10.2 is totally discrete when its going to be made affordable for all homes that’s the question. I mean they haven’t even got there act together with 7.1 for the yet let alone 10.2.

    60KW well looks like Empire has got a challenge over its 56KW, they always try for more power don't they.

    “Mr. Scott I need more power!”

    “She can’t, take no more she’s starting to breaking up"!

    Granted this maybe a home cinema version even the owner here has done right with installing in the THX baffle wall for video projection, except I can’t see the high frequency absorbent on the wall to stop the high frequencies bouncing of the screen and back onto the wall.



    Still that’s the approach I’d take when I get a video projector.

    The clock is ticking in the background and Cal is mad as hell.

  15. #15
    Suspended PeruvianSkies's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    3,373
    Thank you so much for posting this thread. This is the type of content that I love to see and I am glad to have another person on this forum with film knowledge! Welcome!

    btw...3 of my best cinema experiences are as follows...

    TERMINATOR 2 in 70mm blow up
    DOCTOR ZHIVAGO in a restored 35mm print
    STARSHIP TROOPERS in 8channel SDDS
    SOPHIE's CHOICE in a beautifully preserved 35mm print
    LAWRENCE OF ARABIA in restored 70mm print
    Jacques Tati's PLAYTIME in 35mm print from 70mm source restored
    2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY in 35mm restored print from 70mm source
    BEAUTY AND THE BEAST (1946) with live orchestra

  16. #16
    Forum Regular Brainstorm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Bournemouth, Dorset, United Kingdom
    Posts
    195
    PeruvianSkies

    There’s few on that list that I would have liked to have seen in a THX sound system cinema. Lawrence of Arabia which I only happed to see in a substandard cinema but still it was it was presented in Super Panavision 70mm Dolby SR type at the Odeon Marble Arch London 1988, about a year later it played at the Warner Bros West End in 70mm Dolby SR THX. I’m still kicking myself!

    Terminator 2 played over at UCI High Wycombe in THX where only happed to have seen just one film there during early 1990 (Arachnophobia) in Dolby stereo SR the bass and sub bass extension during the opening credits was phenomenal it was deeply on DEEPLY pressing my body with clear octave to octave of each bass note with sheer SLAM KICK RUMBLE that never let up once.

    I would have liked to have seen T2 there, the cinema site was voted on of the best THX cinemas in the world. Sadly the licence has been dropped at that site some time around the early 2000?

    Also when the THX trailer (Broadway) played dear god it was pressing on my body before it reached the peak level of its dynamic range 10/10!

    The clock is ticking in the background and Cal is mad as hell.

  17. #17
    Suspended PeruvianSkies's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    3,373
    Brainstorm...

    What do you think/feel about the new DLP movie theaters???

  18. #18
    Forum Regular Brainstorm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Bournemouth, Dorset, United Kingdom
    Posts
    195
    PeruvianSkies

    It’s been years since I worked in the cinema of 1998. I have only read the reports on it and heard a few visual effects artists commenting on its performance Richard Edlund described it fairly well which made my nod one or two times during the Die Hard commentary session.

    So if I where to see it in the cinema I’d be looking for (black levels) “pixels” where Edlund pointed out, you can see it all moving around its close its good but its got a long way too go, its like trading one artefact for the other being you see soft grain and golf balls on 35mm.

    I would say it would be very unlikely I’ll ever see DLP in the cinema Dolby digital cinema is still a long way off before its widely used in all the cinemas only the large metropolitan areas have DLP in the UK.

    Since1999 not looking good at all. Maybe you should ask David Lean this question.

    Film is original television isn’t.
    David Lean

    Not even the Warner Village 12 screen had DLP and not like it would and that was a brand new site during the late of 1998.

    The DLP technology is probably more widely used in the consumer home cinema, except even all that’s about to change with LED projection in the home coming soon?

    The clock is ticking in the background and Cal is mad as hell.

  19. #19
    Suspended PeruvianSkies's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    3,373
    Quote Originally Posted by Brainstorm
    PeruvianSkies


    Since1999 not looking good at all. Maybe you should ask David Lean this question.

    Film is original television isn’t.
    David Lean

    I would ask him, but he's been dead nearly 16 years now.

  20. #20
    Forum Regular Brainstorm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Bournemouth, Dorset, United Kingdom
    Posts
    195
    PeruvianSkies

    The only good thing about it is no scratches on the print and what’s this with running it with 1KW light most 70mm house run 2 to 3KW.

    The clock is ticking in the background and Cal is mad as hell.

  21. #21
    Forum Regular Woochifer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    6,883
    I was fortunate enough to live within walking distance of several great single-screen theaters in L.A.'s Westwood Village (next to the UCLA campus), which is also where many of the early THX installations went. If a film was available in 70mm or any of the higher quality pre-DD/DTS/SDDS sound formats available with 35mm (4-track mag stripe, CDS), that print was showing in Westwood.

    The very first THX installation in the world (along with a now demolished theater in suburban Dallas) was the AVCO Center cinema in Westwood, which premiered in conjunction with Return of the Jedi. Wonderful theater with excellent imaging, deep bass, razor sharp projection quality, great acoustics, and excellent sight lines (the seating arrangement was shaped like a V with the rows narrowing as they got closer to the screen).

    Seeing Die Hard in 70mm at that theater was a transcendent moviegoing experience. It was all the more transcendent because at that time the AVCO was the only theater in the country showing Die Hard, so there was a huge buzz in the audience that had been building over the past couple of weekends. Hard to imagine now, but Bruce Willis was considered box office poison, which forced Fox to roll out Die Hard gradually to quietly build up the buzz, since they knew that they had a potential box office hit on their hands that required some creative marketing (I remember when the early Die Hard trailers featuring Bruce Willis got booed by audiences, which forced Fox to pull them and eventually reissue a different trailer that barely showed Willis). I know that the AVCO got the only 70mm print in southern California, not sure if any other 70mm prints of that movie went to other markets. As a side note, that screening was also when I saw the THX "Broadway" trailer for the first time.

    Unfortunately, the AVCO management decided to halve that wonderful auditorium after the 1993 run of Jurassic Park, which totally ruined the acoustics and the great sight lines (that V-configuration was kept, which meant that half the seats in the new smaller auditoriums would be at an angle, despite the screen being repositioned).

    Another great theater is the Mann Westwood Village, which is a massive single-screen 1,400 seat auditorium with a 60-foot silver emulsion screen and a great sound system. This was one of the early THX installations, and the lobby used to have a lighted placard listing all of the components used in the sound system. At one point, the Village Theater was one of THX's showcase theaters, where they would try out new components. It was also where Dolby Digital (with Batman Returns) and SDDS (with The Last Action Hero) made their premiere. The theater is also the site for countless Hollywood premieres, and they like to pull out the little decorating touches like illuminating the theater with a batsignal (see below).



    The acoustics are not ideal because the theater has a balcony (in fact, I would say that the sound is better up in the front of the balcony), but the showpiece of that theater for years was a massive subwoofer array up front. I recall that the theater ripped out three rows of seats to build a custom enclosure that housed 12 Cerwin Vega subwoofers (the same ones used by Universal for its gut churning Sensurround presentations). The thing was freakin' loud and could move your hair from the middle of the theater, but it never felt boomy or overworked. It could clearly do a lot more damage if they wanted to crank the volume up a bit more. More recently though, they removed that subwoofer array and redid the sound system (not sure if it's an improvement). They've also gone to digital projection, which I think does not work well for this theater because of the large screen size and the high quality of their film projection.

    The movies I've seen here include Lethal Weapon I-III, Batman, Batman Returns, Star Trek V, Star Trek Generations, Star Wars Ep. I-IV, Last Action Hero, Titanic, Lord of the Rings: TTT and ROTK, and Superman Returns. Even though I live in the Bay Area, I will often schedule my moviegoing around trips to L.A. so that I can take advantage of the better theaters down there.

    Like some of the others, I love the Cinerama Dome, but it also has its own set of caveats. For one thing, the deeply curved 90' Cinerama screen looks great if you're sitting dead center, but if you're off to the side, the image can look warped. When the Dome was refurbished a few years ago, they substantially reworked the acoustics. It's now pretty good (before, the acoustics were awful and very inconsistent from location to location), but the dome shape still creates dead spaces in some parts of the auditorium. Even with these presentation inconsistencies, the Dome is beloved by film buffs because they will periodically run the big 70mm and Cinerama roadshow prints. The Dome's refurb restored the two side projection booths, so they can now screen three-strip Cinerama movies, which they've done to packed houses. The Dome is also known for its occasional 70mm roadshow festivals. I've seen 70mm presentations of 2001: A Space Odyssey, Apocalypse Now, and Lawrence of Arabia at this theater.

    That Dome refurb also added a 12-screen Arclight Cinema multiplex, which IMO features some outstanding presentation quality. They are basic black rectangular theaters built to exceed the THX specs, and the acoustics, seating, projection, and surround imaging in these theaters are outstanding. Plus, the Arclight features outstanding service, reserved seating, 21+ screenings, and a bar in the lobby. Coupled with diligent attention to presentation quality, this is easily the best moviegoing experience I've ever had from a multiplex.

    http://www.arclightcinemas.com/Arcli...tml?path=about

    This is one of the Arclight Cinema's "black auditoriums"

    Interior of the Dome


    For whatever reason, I've never been overly impressed with the presentation quality at Grauman's Chinese. Make no mistake, if you're visiting L.A. and can only visit one theater, this is the one to go for because of its architecture, location, and history. For presentation quality, there are better theaters in L.A., but the Chinese theater is still better than the vast majority of theaters elsewhere, including most other THX auditoriums.

    Even though I think that THX has done a great job at elevating the overall level of theatrical presentation quality, the THX label doesn't mean as much as it used to. The early THX installations went well beyond the basic THX specs and equipment list, and a THX auditorium at a 25-screen megaplex does not deliver the same experience as, for example, the Village theater which has other enhancements aside from the THX certification.

    Sir Terrence (a movie sound engineer who used to post regularly on this board) felt that John Allen's HPS-4000 theater sound system was far superior to THX. For one thing, HPS-4000 designs and builds their own horn speakers, and does the installation and testing themselves. The now-demolished Century Plaza Theater in Los Angeles used to have a HPS-4000 system, and I've seen movies there and can vouch for the imaging and sound clarity of that system. Unfortunately, they were in the smaller auditoriums, which were chopped up from larger rooms, so the shape of the theaters were not ideal acoustically.

    The 8-channel HPS-4000 installation at the General Cinema (now AMC) in Framingham, MA is their reference theater, and I've heard from others that the HPS-4000 theaters in Waikiki delivered the best theater sound they've ever heard. There's a list of other HPS-4000 installations on their website. Anyone who's ever been to one of these should post their impressions, because I'm very curious as to how others compare HPS-4000 to THX.

    http://www.hps4000.com/pages/mainpage.html
    Last edited by Woochifer; 02-27-2007 at 05:21 PM.
    Wooch's Home Theater 2.0 (Pics)
    Panasonic VIERA TH-C50FD18 50" 1080p
    Paradigm Reference Studio 40, CC, and 20 v.2
    Adire Audio Rava (EQ: Behringer Feedback Destroyer DSP1124)
    Yamaha RX-A1030
    Dual CS5000 (Ortofon OM30 Super)
    Sony UBP-X800
    Sony Playstation 3 (MediaLink OS X Server)
    Sony ES SCD-C2000ES
    JVC HR-S3912U
    Directv HR44 and WVB
    Logitech Harmony 700
    iPhone 5s/iPad 3
    Linksys WES610



    The Neverending DVD/BD Collection

    Subwoofer Setup and Parametric EQ Results *Dead Link*

  22. #22
    Forum Regular Woochifer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    6,883
    Here's a nice historical shot of the Cinerama Dome, with its original Altec VOT screen speaker setup. You can see the curvature of the screen (which goes 90' and uses 5 screen speakers), which the Dome preserved after its renovation. The current setup uses JBL screen speakers, and they've also done some much needed acoustical treatment behind the screen.

    Wooch's Home Theater 2.0 (Pics)
    Panasonic VIERA TH-C50FD18 50" 1080p
    Paradigm Reference Studio 40, CC, and 20 v.2
    Adire Audio Rava (EQ: Behringer Feedback Destroyer DSP1124)
    Yamaha RX-A1030
    Dual CS5000 (Ortofon OM30 Super)
    Sony UBP-X800
    Sony Playstation 3 (MediaLink OS X Server)
    Sony ES SCD-C2000ES
    JVC HR-S3912U
    Directv HR44 and WVB
    Logitech Harmony 700
    iPhone 5s/iPad 3
    Linksys WES610



    The Neverending DVD/BD Collection

    Subwoofer Setup and Parametric EQ Results *Dead Link*

  23. #23
    Forum Regular anamorphic96's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    538
    Thanks for the input and pics Woochifer. Now that I live in LA I have had a chance to visit alot of the theaters talked about here.

    The Westwood Village when I watched The Departed had poor acoustics as you mentioned and a very harsh sound with no sub bass to really speak of. Maybe it has not been balanced and EQ'd in a while, but I was not impressed with the sound. It was a DLP presentation and looked great though.

    Tried to watch Lady In The Water at the Bruin but walked out and asked for a refund due to the light being out of focus and very dim. Not even close to 16fl. There was also a very noticeable shutter ghost. I brought the issues to the managements attention but have not been back since. The sound was good but nothing close to the Arclight.

    I watched Clerks 2 at The National, which was ok but nothing special. Light was dim and not focused well. Good sound but could not really judge it completely due to the movie.

    The Westwood theaters are good places IMO to watch movies but don't even come close to the Arclight.

    The Arclight is the be all end all. They get it right every time. Perfect light with perfect sound. Never watched a movie that started out of frame or have I seen a scratch on any print. You get exactly what the director wanted you to see and hear. I have now watched probably 50 movies if not more there. I am now working with one of the old projectionists and will be getting a tour in the next couple of weeks. Can't wait for this.

    On a side note. Klipsch is making all the speakers for John Allen's HPS 4000 systems now. I think he has used various manufactures but Klipsch is the current one.

    Post some more pics if you have them.

  24. #24
    Forum Regular Woochifer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    6,883
    Quote Originally Posted by anamorphic96
    Thanks for the input and pics Woochifer. Now that I live in LA I have had a chance to visit alot of the theaters talked about here.

    The Westwood Village when I watched The Departed had poor acoustics as you mentioned and a very harsh sound with no sub bass to really speak of. Maybe it has not been balanced and EQ'd in a while, but I was not impressed with the sound. It was a DLP presentation and looked great though.
    I've now seen two movies at the Village with DLP, and I much prefer the film projection. For whatever reason, the digital projection looks darker than the film projection. The Village has a great screen, so even a dark DLP image looks good, but compared to what I had grown accustomed to at that theater, it simply didn't measure up. (Keep in mind that when I lived around there, the majority of movies showing at the Village were in 70mm)

    The Village sound system was something to behold right after the Village got its THX certification. As maligned as Bose is on this board, the Village (and the National) used to use the 802 monitors as the surrounds. And I actually liked that tonality better than the generic JBL surrounds that they currently use. I never thought that the Village sound system was harsh (you want harsh, try the Chinese), but that might also depend on where you sit. Up in the balcony, I thought that the imaging from the screen speakers better blended with the surrounds. I've only been to the Village twice since they removed the CV subwoofer array from the front of the auditorium, and you're right in that the sub-bass does not have nearly the impact that it had before.

    I know that the Village has updated the sound system at least twice since the initial THX installation, and sadly, it seems that it becomes more and more like a generic THX setup each time.

    Quote Originally Posted by anamorphic96
    Tried to watch Lady In The Water at the Bruin but walked out and asked for a refund due to the light being out of focus and very dim. Not even close to 16fl. There was also a very noticeable shutter ghost. I brought the issues to the managements attention but have not been back since. The sound was good but nothing close to the Arclight.

    I watched Clerks 2 at The National, which was ok but nothing special. Light was dim and not focused well. Good sound but could not really judge it completely due to the movie.

    The Westwood theaters are good places IMO to watch movies but don't even come close to the Arclight.
    I have not been to the Bruin in years. I've heard that the management has done a poor job at maintaining that theater, which is too bad. Along with the Village, National, and AVCO, the Bruin was one of the early THX installations. It differed somewhat from the Village and National in that it used acoustic suspension Boston Acoustics speakers as the surrounds. It did not have the gutteral bass impact that the Village had, or the top to bottom excellence of the AVCO, but I loved the tonality of the surrounds at the Bruin.

    The National helped catapult Westwood Village to prominence as a moviegoing destination when it premiered The Exorcist and had an exclusive engagement for months. It was the last single screen theater to be built in L.A.

    While I think the Arclight's attention to detail is second to none, I still enjoy going to the Westwood theaters, because there's still something to be said for a good old single-screen movie theater, especially ones that have been refitted with decent sound systems. Just within a five-minute walk, Westwood Village has seven single-screen movie theaters, and to me, that's something worth supporting. I never realized how unique that was until I visited other cities and found how difficult it is to keep a single-screen theater afloat. I mean, Manhattan is now down to ONE single-screen movie theater (the Ziegfeld), and it goes dark for weeks at a time.

    Quote Originally Posted by anamorphic96
    The Arclight is the be all end all. They get it right every time. Perfect light with perfect sound. Never watched a movie that started out of frame or have I seen a scratch on any print. You get exactly what the director wanted you to see and hear. I have now watched probably 50 movies if not more there. I am now working with one of the old projectionists and will be getting a tour in the next couple of weeks. Can't wait for this.

    On a side note. Klipsch is making all the speakers for John Allen's HPS 4000 systems now. I think he has used various manufactures but Klipsch is the current one.

    Post some more pics if you have them.
    Enjoy the tour!

    As much as I like the Arclight, it still has a multiplex feel to it, and the grand old Cinerama Dome has its own compromises. Oh well, I guess if I had my druthers, I would do all of my movie viewing at the Cary Grant Theater (the dubbing theater on the Columbia Studio lot where I have gone for a couple of movie previews), but alas I can't just walk up to the door and buy a ticket there!
    Wooch's Home Theater 2.0 (Pics)
    Panasonic VIERA TH-C50FD18 50" 1080p
    Paradigm Reference Studio 40, CC, and 20 v.2
    Adire Audio Rava (EQ: Behringer Feedback Destroyer DSP1124)
    Yamaha RX-A1030
    Dual CS5000 (Ortofon OM30 Super)
    Sony UBP-X800
    Sony Playstation 3 (MediaLink OS X Server)
    Sony ES SCD-C2000ES
    JVC HR-S3912U
    Directv HR44 and WVB
    Logitech Harmony 700
    iPhone 5s/iPad 3
    Linksys WES610



    The Neverending DVD/BD Collection

    Subwoofer Setup and Parametric EQ Results *Dead Link*

  25. #25
    Suspended PeruvianSkies's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    3,373
    Has anyone else seen PLAYTIME in 70mm???

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •