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  1. #1
    Forum Regular Woochifer's Avatar
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    The Dark Knight: Record Breaking Midnight Showings

    The box office numbers have already come in for the midnight showings of The Dark Knight. With $18.5 million in ticket sales, The Dark Knight broke the previous midnight opening record held since 2005 by Revenge of the Sith. This does not include the ticket sales from the 3am and 6am showings that some theaters added to accommodate the overflow.

    The only question now is whether The Dark Knight's overall box office take for the weekend will eclipse the opening weekend records set by Spider-Man 3 (biggest opening ever) and Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest (biggest July opening ever).

    http://www.marketwatch.com/news/stor...060}&dist=hppr
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  2. #2
    Oh where have ye gone RL?
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    Well, I contributed to the take this morning when I played hookey from work and, at 11 am took all 2.5 hrs. of it in. That showing wasn't completely sold out, but darn near it.

    I'll give my impressions of this blockbuster later. Suffice to say, we've lost a GREAT actor.
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    VIP Member Smokey's Avatar
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    Lets all hope it will live it to its expectation.

    If this movie have the same tone as Batman Begins (too dark), think I wait till DVD comes out.

  4. #4
    Forum Regular Woochifer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smokey
    Lets all hope it will live it to its expectation.

    If this movie have the same tone as Batman Begins (too dark), think I wait till DVD comes out.
    You mean wait until the DVD hits the WalMart or Big Lots bins?

    Actually, I thought Batman Begins hit exactly the right tone for the Batman character. Certainly a lot more faithful to the comic book depictions than the crap that Joel Schumacher inflicted on batfans with Batman Forever and Batman & Robin. If you read any of the Batman graphic novels like The Dark Knight Returns, Batman: Year One or Killing Joke, Batman is supposed to be a shadowy scary vigilante, and the Joker is not some goofy prankster -- he's a sadistic killer who enjoys mayhem and murder for its own sake.

    The Dark Knight is supposed to be even darker and more disturbing than Batman Begins. Critics are comparing it more with dark crime thrillers like The Departed and Heat than other comic book movies.
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  5. #5
    Oh where have ye gone RL?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Woochifer
    ...Actually, I thought Batman Begins hit exactly the right tone for the Batman character. Certainly a lot more faithful to the comic book depictions than the crap that Joel Schumacher inflicted on batfans with Batman Forever and Batman & Robin. If you read any of the Batman graphic novels like The Dark Knight Returns, Batman: Year One or Killing Joke, Batman is supposed to be a shadowy scary vigilante, and the Joker is not some goofy prankster -- he's a sadistic killer who enjoys mayhem and murder for its own sake.
    Exactly. And this one lives right up to it. You nailed it Wooch!
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    I put the Gee in Gear.... thekid's Avatar
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    My daughter went to a midnight showing because her friends wanted to see it. My daughter is not anywhere close to being a comic book fan or even an action/adventure film fan. So when I bought tickets for the 9:30 AM show today for my wife, my son and myself I was completely surprised when she asked where was her ticket. so she will be rising early with the rest of us and seeing it for the second time in 2 days.

    For a teenager to want to go see a film a second time that is showing at that time of the morning who is not into this type of film is probably the highest form of praise. Can't wait to see it and have a big ol bag a popcorn for breakfast.......

  7. #7
    Aging Smartass
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    I saw it yesterday with my wife at a 10:00 AM showing, along with about a dozen other people. One of the perks of retirement is the ability to go to the movies early in the day and see blockbuster films in virtually empty theatres, with no wait, or worry about not being able to get in.

    I thought it was quite good, but I had a few quibbles: for one, it's at least 1/2 hour too long. For another, it's relentlessly grim and dark, to the point of being depressing. It's also extremely suspenseful (a good thing), and often I had to remind myself that I was just watching a movie! Last, there's no humor anywhere in the film, save an occasional witty remark from Michael Caine. The lack of humor only adds to the grim, dark atmosphere.

    Still, Heath Ledger's performance is nothing less than remarkable. It's highly likely he'll receive a posthumous Oscar Nod (and could even win!) for Best Supporting Actor. His "Joker" character isn't the silly incarnation previous Jokers were, but an all new take resulting in perhaps the most vile, and unceasingly and downright evil screen villain in a long, long time. He's downright scary, he's so bad! The film's worth seeing, if only to see the last performance of a truly terrific young actor. He'll be sorely missed.

  8. #8
    RGA
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    So far this film along with the little seen "In Bruges" are my favorites of the year. Miles better than Iron Man.

    BUT the warning here is for folks who want to see a light comic book movie film like Spiderman you're not going to get it. This is an actual film and what is interesting here is that it plays a lot less like a comic book and a lot more like a social commentary. There is no Batman lore with cheese ball comic book level writing. This movie could have worked without the Joker's painted face and with the dark night not wearing a bat suit. That's a compliment!

    Batman Begins was an excellent film but it did have the onerous job of providing exposition about how the batman came to be - and most people know that by now - it's a little bit of what bogged down the first Superman and Spiderman movies. The sequel in all three cases IMO are better because rather than filling in somewhat tedious exposition we can get right to a story and screen time is dedicated to more than JUST the title character.

    While I enjoyed Batman Begins the Dark Knight is a far better movie. The tension is real here - it does not play in just the comic book realm - we care about the characters, we care about Harvey Dent and we see ourselves and our world in this film with chaos (the joker) right around the corner.

    Ledger's joker is a real person not a cartoon that Jack Nicholson played. Jack was fun but when I came home yesterday from seeing Ledger's Joker - the Nicholson Batman was on TV. I call it the Nicholson Batman because every second Nicholson was not on the screen that Batman movie STUNK. Bassinger was just terrible as well.

    I digress. Dark Knight is dark, the Joker is not a funny guy, he's a sadist, a killer, a psychotic but not in a mugging for the camera sort of way.

    I think you know when a super hero movie is truly special is when the special effects are very secondary to what is going on. You don't notice the CGI - and the special effects are there to support the story not to BE the story.

    Ledger deserves a nomination but I would argue that Christopher Nolan deserves a best director nod as well. Rarely does a super hero movie escape the genre. Batman has always been, arguably, the most storied and interesting of the super hero characters because unlike other super heroes Bruce Wayne is in the end just a man - there is no super strength or laser beam eyes or shooting ice shards out of his hands.

    In a way I was thinking back to the show Dexter (if you have not seen it see it) because essentially Dexter is a similar character. And the line of good and evil hero and terrorist murderer and righteous is a fine line. The ideals of a government writes on paper versus their actions "Guantanamo" is seen in this film as well.

    This is arguably the greatest Superhero movie ever made - but people who like to see a superhero movie like the Superman and Spiderman films might be disappointed by the bleak dark nature of this one.

    9/10

    For comparison (6 out of 10 or better is recommended thumbs up)

    Batman (1989) 5 / 10
    Batman Returns 5 / 10
    Batman Forever 3 / 10
    Batman and Robin 1 / 10
    Batman: The Movie (1966) 6/10 (so bad it was funny)
    Batman Begins 8/10

    Superman 7 / 10
    Superman II 7.5 / 10 (not the Donner Cut)
    Superman III 3.5 / 10
    Superman IV 1 / 10

    Spiderman 7 / 10
    Spiderman II 8 / 10
    Spiderman III 5.5 / 10

    X-Men 5.5 / 10
    X-Men II 5.5 /10
    X Men III 4 / 10

    Iron Man 6.5 / 10

  9. #9
    Oh where have ye gone RL?
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    Why so serious RGA?
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  10. #10
    RGA
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    I guess the movie stuck with me

  11. #11
    VIP Member Smokey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Woochifer
    You mean wait until the DVD hits the WalMart or Big Lots bins?
    Hopefully not. By that time, the rest of movie actors might also be dead

    As I was reading RGA and emaidel’s reviews (and most online reviews), I noticed that they did not mention any thing about its IMAX scenes-as Wooch said about 20% of the total film length were filmed using 70mm IMAX cameras.

    So IMAX seem not to be a big factor in this movie attraction (given that there maybe one IMAX theater per town).

  12. #12
    VIP Member Smokey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RGA

    For comparison (6 out of 10 or better is recommended thumbs up)

    Batman (1989) 5 / 10
    Batman Returns 5 / 10
    Batman Forever 3 / 10
    Batman and Robin 1 / 10
    Batman: The Movie (1966) 6/10 (so bad it was funny)
    Batman Begins 8/10
    Batman Forever only get 3 stars! IMO this movie had the best villains of entire Batman series.


  13. #13
    Forum Regular Woochifer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smokey
    Hopefully not. By that time, the rest of movie actors might also be dead
    What?! You mean you're actually going to pay full price for a DVD?! Someone call 9-1-1, the real Smokey's missing!

    Quote Originally Posted by Smokey
    As I was reading RGA and emaidel’s reviews (and most online reviews), I noticed that they did not mention any thing about its IMAX scenes-as Wooch said about 20% of the total film length were filmed using 70mm IMAX cameras.
    Actually, plenty of the online and newspaper reviews and pre-release articles about the movie mentioned IMAX. For one thing, most of the big city press screenings were done exclusively at IMAX theaters.

    A Google search for the terms "the dark knight" and "imax" will return over 2,000 news articles.

    That's why there has been such a huge run on the IMAX screenings. The only thing holding back the box office numbers on the IMAX screenings was simply capacity. A total of 94 IMAX screens showed The Dark Knight, while about the movie opened on over 10,000 screens total.

    Quote Originally Posted by Smokey
    So IMAX seem not to be a big factor in this movie attraction (given that there maybe one IMAX theater per town).
    The IMAX screenings accounted for more than $6.2 million of the weekend box office (about 4% of the box office total, and less than 1% of the total screens), which was also an all-time box office record for IMAX. An interview with the IMAX CEO indicated that the IMAX screenings were a complete sell out this week with all available tickets sold. Considering that IMAX tickets for The Dark Knight were selling on eBay for upwards of $90, I'd say there was plenty of demand.

    Keep in mind that the first screenings to sell out in every city were the IMAX ones (some of which sold out within hours of going on sale 4 weeks ago). In general, for big blockbusters, IMAX screenings hold their audience much better from week to week. Part of the reason is that a lot of fans want to see it on opening night no matter what, but then watch it in IMAX for their second (or third) viewing.
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  14. #14
    Forum Regular Woochifer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smokey
    Batman Forever only get 3 stars! IMO this movie had the best villains of entire Batman series.

    Jim Carrey was good as the Riddler, but the rest of the movie was a heap of crap (albeit a cinematic masterpiece compared to Batman & Robin). I mean, you had career worst performances from Val Kilmer, Chris O'Donnell, Tommy Lee Jones, and Nicole Kidman, along with hackmeister director Joel Schumacher subjecting audiences to his man-nipple and crotch shot fetishes!
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    Forum Regular BradH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Woochifer
    Actually, I thought Batman Begins hit exactly the right tone for the Batman character. Certainly a lot more faithful to the comic book depictions than the crap that Joel Schumacher inflicted on batfans...
    Joel Schumacher's entire career is a waste of electricity.

    I caught The Dark Knight yesterday. That's one seriously dense, complex storyline that never let's up for 2 1/2 hours. It will definitely take repeated viewings to catch all the implications. Ledger was priceless. The Pencil Scene was one the funniest, coolest things I've seen in years. At that moment I totally accepted Ledger as The Joker. This was better than Batman Begins but Tim Burton's 1989 Batman is still my favorite of the lot. By far.

    Bring it.

    Quote Originally Posted by RGA
    Batman Begins was an excellent film but it did have the onerous job of providing exposition about how the batman came to be...
    That's one of the reasons I like Burton's first turn at bat. (Okay, I couldn't resist.) In that film, the Batman was surrounded in mystery (the exposition was all on the Joker) and what was slowly revealed was more twisted than anything Nolan has brought so far. Sure, Ledger's Joker was extreme but Keaton's Bruce Wayne had a split personality, was awkward with women, and beat people up while dressed in black leather like a bat. That was his release, he had to do it. That's twisted. The beauty part is that all this was subversively placed within a summer blockbuster but never explicity explained like it would've been in Nolan's hands. Ledger's Joker tries to convince Batman to submit to public anarchy while Nicholson's Joker reflected Keaton's own dark side, they were doppelgangers. Would Wayne fall to psychological madness or would he get the girl? One film was a psychologic exploration of the complex nature of madness and the other was a complex crime/punishment/terrorism fable. That alone doesn't make one better than the other but I'm amazed when people so readily dismiss the first Batfilm as fluff. It was clear to me in 1989 that Burton had taken Miller's The Dark Knight Returns and smashed it up a little with Moore's The Watchmen, resulting in a decadent alt-future Gotham City that looked like a combination of Metropolis, Blade Runner and Brazil. Throw in some Gothic elements from Dracula and Phantom of the Opera and you've got something that's all over any comic book film including Spidey or X-anything.

    But I would definitely rank The Dark Knight as second of all time. Burton's second batflick hit the fail button despite its visual beauty; I don't think he was really into the project. Then, as producer, he handed the franchise off to Schumacher and for that he should publicly run in his underwear through a gauntlet of towel-popping film gods. Or something.

    Btw, can we officially call Bob Kane a genius after all those brilliant archetypes he created? Look how many different ways they lend themselves to interpretation in various hands. Amazing.

  16. #16
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    BatMan

    Seen it sunday, Joker was great, sounded great, Had a good time watching this movie.

  17. #17
    RGA
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    Unfortunately for me the original Batman(1989) was let down by pretty poor acting (except Nicholson) and that includes Keaton. I respect ideas in films as I respect it in music but you have to be able to communicate it well. Bob Dylan mumbles everything so whatever he is trying to say must be in the liner notes because the man has one of the worst singing voices I've ever heard and people complain about American Idol.

    The Batman 1989 comes across more as a comic book which depending how you view things could be a good thing. Nolan's Batman is ultimately more believable - virtually everything that happens in both movies is somewhat of a believable future including the stunt work. A ninja in a bat suit with lots of money to buy expensive arms - hey they can leap from buildings and take out 10 guys.

    None of that back story was in the 1989 version. I found no depth in terms of character development and certainly no feeling. Hell I wanted the Joker to win because it was the only performance I enjoyed.

    Batman Returns I liked more on second and third viewings. But really in all four of those films the LEAST interesting character was Batman. Nolan actually creates a character study as much as anything else and for the first time in film Batman is actually an interesting well rounded character.

    I went and put Batman Begins on last night and I liked it more than the first time.

    And with the new Superman film, and other super hero movies like Iron Man, Hulk, Spiderman, X-men, Fantastic Four, Hellboy, Catwoman....

    I want to see some sort of quasi Justice League battle royal movie.

    Anyone know what Nolan is gonna do next with the Batman - who will be the next villain - tune in next week - same bat time same bat channel.

  18. #18
    Close 'n Play® user Troy's Avatar
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    My wife fell asleep. I came close, especially in the 3rd act after Dent became 2-face.

    Ledger was a blast, but that's about it for me. It was just a lot of noise and hysteria without any really engaging characters or real meaning. All the intensity and pathos felt forced and artificial. Bale's gruff Batman voice sounded silly and WAY over the top. The "shocking" plot twists were all too telegraphed and predictable. Convoluted and bloated with about 12 too many characters and superfluous scenes, the movie was at least 45 minutes too long. I think I've seen all of Chris Nolan's movies now and can safely say that he's the most over-rated, unsubtle director working today.

    How many Batman movies can Americans sit through? What is this, the 7th or 8th? Enough already! There hasn't been a single one that's been better than 3 stars.

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    I cant wait to see this movie. Just need to free up some time to go

  20. #20
    Forum Regular Woochifer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BradH
    Joel Schumacher's entire career is a waste of electricity.
    Couldn't agree more, although in his defense, I read that the turn in direction with the Batman series beginning with Batman Forever was basically forced on Schumacher by the studio bosses who wanted a more campy and kid-friendly movie than the decidedly dark and bizarre Batman Returns (which is one of those movies that I appreciate a lot more than I like or enjoy). Even so, he chose to keep the batnipples, so that pretty much cements his infamy in my book!

    Quote Originally Posted by BradH
    I caught The Dark Knight yesterday. That's one seriously dense, complex storyline that never let's up for 2 1/2 hours. It will definitely take repeated viewings to catch all the implications. Ledger was priceless. The Pencil Scene was one the funniest, coolest things I've seen in years. At that moment I totally accepted Ledger as The Joker. This was better than Batman Begins but Tim Burton's 1989 Batman is still my favorite of the lot. By far.
    Because my wife and I couldn't get out this weekend, I rewatched Batman and Batman Begins. Those two visions of the Batman saga are about as decidedly different as you can get!

    Kind of a paradox because the Tim Burton movie was drawn up in a gothic comic book world yet very much rooted in late-80s pop culture and strongly reflected the sensibility of that era. For that movie, the style and flair was every bit as important as the story and the action, and that very much reflected the times. In contrast, the Nolan movie was rooted in more of a real world setting but the Batman character was presented more as a mythic presence.

    I like both movies, but I think Batman Begins holds up a lot better through repeat viewings. As RGA points out, the Nolan film simply has a much stronger script.

    Quote Originally Posted by BradH
    Btw, can we officially call Bob Kane a genius after all those brilliant archetypes he created? Look how many different ways they lend themselves to interpretation in various hands. Amazing.
    Yep, I would agree there. I think that in a way, the times caught up with Kane's comic book depiction. He created Batman during a time before serial killers wearing clown make-up became the stuff of reality, and before you had debates on the TV news about vigilantes patrolling city streets. Batman speaks to today's world much more than other comic book heroes from the golden era like Superman, Captain America, et al.

    Also have to remember though that a lot of comic book heroes had to pull back on their creative arc during the 50s and 60s because of the Comics Code.

    Quote Originally Posted by RGA
    Unfortunately for me the original Batman(1989) was let down by pretty poor acting (except Nicholson) and that includes Keaton. I respect ideas in films as I respect it in music but you have to be able to communicate it well.
    I kinda have the opposite opinion here. Every successive time I've seen the original Batman, the less I like Nicholson's Joker. It seems more like I was watching Nicholson in clown makeup, than actually seeing him create a standalone character. Looking forward to seeing Heath Ledger's version of the Joker, because I've yet to see a live action Joker that matches the outright nightmarish and evil villian that he is in the comics (at least the more recent and original depictions).

    In that respect, I liked Keaton's low key portrayal of Batman. Where he fell short was when he had to resort to Bruce Wayne (and this is where I think Christian Bale's more multidimensional portrayal wins out overall).

    Quote Originally Posted by RGA
    The Batman 1989 comes across more as a comic book which depending how you view things could be a good thing. Nolan's Batman is ultimately more believable - virtually everything that happens in both movies is somewhat of a believable future including the stunt work.
    But, I think that was the whole point of the Burton movie. He was trying to create a grandiose gothic comic book world that's not rooted in reality (Warren Beatty would take it to the next level the following year with Dick Tracy). Yet, it strangely epitomized the pop cultural sensibility of the late-80s in how the visual style and general feel of that world was perhaps more important than the dialog. Burton is a very visual director, and this movie very much fit with his particular approach to storytelling. Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn't, but in this case I thought it worked more often than not.

    Quote Originally Posted by Troy
    I think I've seen all of Chris Nolan's movies now and can safely say that he's the most over-rated, unsubtle director working today.
    Couldn't disagree more. With Memento, Insomnia, Batman Begins, The Prestige and now The Dark Knight under his belt, I find Nolan to be the most interesting and versatile director out there right now. With The Prestige he actually made a Hugh Jackman character interesting, and that's saying a lot. Have yet to see TDK, but the consensus from critics and audiences alike on this and Nolan's other films seems to disagree with you.

    Quote Originally Posted by Troy
    How many Batman movies can Americans sit through? What is this, the 7th or 8th? Enough already!

    There hasn't been a single one that's been better than 3 stars.
    Well, with $158 million in domestic ticket sales over the weekend, apparently the public's appetite for Batman hasn't let up, and more Batman movies are on the way. Yet, despite being disappointed time after time by the Batman movies, you still ponied up and braved the crowds on opening weekend for The Dark Knight? Maybe you need to sit the next one out ...
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    Forum Regular BradH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RGA
    Unfortunately for me the original Batman(1989) was let down by pretty poor acting (except Nicholson) and that includes Keaton. I respect ideas in films as I respect it in music but you have to be able to communicate it well.
    The whole point of that film was that Bruce Wayne didn't look like he could kick anyone's butt. Again, it was a split personality thing. I think these ideas were communicated well; Keaton is, I think, a far better actor than Christian Bale who is clearly the same person in or out of the suit - and in every movie, it seems. If you take the political allegory out of The Dark Knight then half the things people do in that film make no sense; it's debatable how well any of that was communicated. Also, Burton's movies lose a lot if they're not seen on the big screen. That's true of anything but it happens with some directors more than others. I'm glad Nolan's revived Batman but he's not in the ballpark with Tim Burton when it comes to style. From a visual sense, Nolan's films could've been done by any number of directors. You make a great point about whether a comic book film should be realistic or look like a comic book. I come down on the comic book side, otherwise it's just James Bond in a batsuit. Even the great WB animation looked like the Fleischer Bros, very art-deco. Nolan has to explain so much because everything is set in a modern, believable world. Burton's screwed up retro-future landscape allowed some mystery about the Batman. It was a decadent playground where anything could happen. One thing about Nolan, he's not afraid to take chances. 40 more minutes for Harvey Dent? Sure, why the hell not? There's a cult film carelesness to that structure that I sort of admired about The Dark Knight. Twenty years ago that wouldn't have been allowed in a big-buget film. It happened in the Pirates of the Carribean series too. Anyway, I don't think Nolan is a great director but he's a godsend after Clooneys batnipples.

    I'm really looking forward to The Spirit. I've been a Spirit fan since the 70's. And I cannot freaking wait for The Watchmen. I still can't believe that's happening.

  22. #22
    Forum Regular BradH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Woochifer
    I like both movies, but I think Batman Begins holds up a lot better through repeat viewings. As RGA points out, the Nolan film simply has a much stronger script.
    Well, it's certainly more linear but it was an origin story after all. What struck me about Batman was how he was slowly revealed with the same structure Disney used for Capt. Nemo (another vigilante) in 20,000 Leagues Under The Sea. Instead of an exposition about why Nemo was wealthy and how the Nautilus was built, he appears mysteriously, strikes, disappears and is eventually revealed throughout the film. (Granted, that's how it was in the novel too but the origin details were revealed in Verne's godawful sequel Mysterious Island.) Also, as a screenplay, Batman is actually pretty damned tight as a 40's style film-noir crime drama. All the operatic, Gothic stuff was built on top of that.

  23. #23
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    I like Bale's Bruce Wayne compared to Keaton's, who came across as wooden to me. I like that Bale's Batman is much more self-righteous, while Keaton's was more vigilante. I do appreciate that Keaton's turn in the suit was way more a stretch and a pleasant surprise to boot, but the latest Batman movies are just way better scripted.

    After Burton's first Batman movie, it turned into one star-villain-turn after another. All Jim Carrey did was ape Frank Gorshan's Riddler from the '60s TV series, which seemed to be Schumacher's template.

  24. #24
    Sgt. At Arms Worf101's Avatar
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    Yeah Baybeeee

    Quote Originally Posted by s dog
    Seen it sunday, Joker was great, sounded great, Had a good time watching this movie.
    S-Dog FTW!!!! Short, sweet, too the effin point!!! Gutshot baybeee!!!!!

    Da (sometimes less is more) Worfster

  25. #25
    RGA
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    Woochifer

    Let me say Heath's Joker is a lot better than Nicholson's - everything you said about Nicholson's Joker I agree with. he basically was a guy in a clown suit mugging (hamming) it up for the camera. Still it was the only thing in the movie worth watching and I enjoyed the hamming.

    Ledger gets far less screen time in a longer movie.

    I have seen all these Batman films on the big screen and I stand by my assessment. if it ain't on the page it ain't on the stage. I go to movies for good story telling and visuals for me is a very secondary concern UNLESS it supports good story telling. The comic look of the Tim Burton Batman's were incredible but in the end they can't lift it out of the two dimensional caricatures of the comic book. The 1989 version was a silly story with wooden performances with a lot of nice visuals and Jack Nicholson to go way way over the top to cover over the drivel of a story.

    The Nolan Batman's create a more Blade Runner film Noir feel of a big corrupt city (which could be any big city today) with story telling, characters, and human nature front and center.

    This is similarly why I felt Casino Royale is the best James Bond film. The character is a human shark, which is more like what a Bond would really be, and less cartoon like. Though I did enjoy many of the previous Bond films. I understand why people like them over Casino Royale and why people like the comic book looking Batman (1989).

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