• 11-28-2004, 07:21 AM
    kexodusc
    5 Attachment(s)
    (pics) Just finished matching stands for the Ar.com DIY's
    We built 8 of these altoghether...total cost was about $80 US dollars for everything...plus about 14-16 hours of labor...most of it was painting, staining, and sanding (as usual).
    I won't put any pics of the Ar.com DIY's I have built yet (only 2 so far) because they're still naked (raw MDF, haven't veneered)...
    If I can figure out how to build a webpage a bit better, I'll throw a link to it here...

    FYI, the cable is hiden up a small narrow tube inside the octagon shaped pillars of these...they can be filled with sand, but they're pretty heavy and sturdy as is.

    The small stands are 29", the larger ones are 42"...if memory serves.

    Check out the state of the art varnish spraying booth we came up with...

    I figure I'll have time to wrap and stain the speakers between next weekend and the weekend after...I've got 8 of these to do for now...whew!

    Mine are the darker, mahogany red ones to the right, my cousins are the slightly lighter, rosewood finished stands to the left of the pictures...the only other differences are the shape of the bases, mine incorporates 45 degree angles, his are rounded...these will match the front baffle contours of our speakers. Not the screw holes on the tops so we can bolt/attach the speakers to these.

    I went to the local hi-fi shop yesterday afternoon, and Energy, Mission, and some A/V furniture company sell a pair that aren't as heavy or nice as these for almost $200 CDN!!! Crazy.

    <i> This might be easier for some of you:</i>
    http://ca.geocities.com/sdupre0828@r...ker_stands.htm
  • 11-28-2004, 03:55 PM
    dave_bullet
    Those look extremely good. Better than the ugly steel commecrial ones. A great job. Do you have spikes on the feet?

    Cheers,
    Dave.
  • 11-28-2004, 05:40 PM
    kexodusc
    Hey, Dave,

    Just little rubber bumpers for now...they come to a sharp end, but I'll experiment a bit before drilling holes for spikes...In the past I've preferred the rubber solution as apposed to spikes.
    I wish the pictures did the veneer justice...can't wait to pretty up the speakers.
    I was going to go the gloss black route, but Paul and others scared me off after all the work they implied went into it...staining, sanding and varnishing the veneer took a few hours tops...
    Just finished a new black MDF audio stand too...I'll have to dig out the camera for that.
  • 11-28-2004, 06:41 PM
    poneal
    Nice work....
    Those look really nice--better than the ones I made and will not submit a picture of LOL. You got your work cut out for you between now a Christmas. Good luck, have fun and if I don't see you happy holidays to all.
  • 02-22-2005, 08:23 AM
    bcass
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by kexodusc
    Hey, Dave,

    Just little rubber bumpers for now...they come to a sharp end, but I'll experiment a bit before drilling holes for spikes...In the past I've preferred the rubber solution as apposed to spikes.
    I wish the pictures did the veneer justice...can't wait to pretty up the speakers.
    I was going to go the gloss black route, but Paul and others scared me off after all the work they implied went into it...staining, sanding and varnishing the veneer took a few hours tops...
    Just finished a new black MDF audio stand too...I'll have to dig out the camera for that.

    Wow, those are nice stands! Good job. Did you glue real wood veneer to MDF for the posts and just paint the base and pedestal parts? Do you have written plans for them that I could 'borrow'? :-)

    Thanks,
    Bryan
  • 02-22-2005, 08:45 AM
    kexodusc
    2 Attachment(s)
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by bcass
    Wow, those are nice stands! Good job. Did you glue real wood veneer to MDF for the posts and just paint the base and pedestal parts? Do you have written plans for them that I could 'borrow'? :-)

    Thanks,
    Bryan

    Yeah we used iron on veneer for the pillar parts, at first I thought iron on was great, now I hate it...I prefer non backed veneer and contact cement. But iron is good for beginners, and it's a bit cleaner.

    The pillar part was tricky...basically cut 8 tall skinny strips of MDF at 22 degree angles if memory recalls then glue them all together to form the octagon shape pillar. Gloss paint the MDF bass and speaker rest part. Then screw and glue the pillar to each other part...
    The picture doesn't do them justice, the camera I have sucks...
    Here's the finished speakers....

    Send me a personal message with your e-mail address if you want all the exact specs/details. You will not regret building these, a great project!!! Many thanks (still) to Ed!
  • 02-22-2005, 05:24 PM
    bcass
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by kexodusc
    Yeah we used iron on veneer for the pillar parts, at first I thought iron on was great, now I hate it...I prefer non backed veneer and contact cement. But iron is good for beginners, and it's a bit cleaner.

    The pillar part was tricky...basically cut 8 tall skinny strips of MDF at 22 degree angles if memory recalls then glue them all together to form the octagon shape pillar. Gloss paint the MDF bass and speaker rest part. Then screw and glue the pillar to each other part...
    The picture doesn't do them justice, the camera I have sucks...
    Here's the finished speakers....

    Send me a personal message with your e-mail address if you want all the exact specs/details. You will not regret building these, a great project!!! Many thanks (still) to Ed!

    Thanks, kexodusc - I sent you an email from this site.

    You know, I'm thinking that maybe some nice hardwood-veneer plywood would work instead of MDF+veneer, like maybe birch or maple if I can find it. I think Home Depot sells oak and birch plywood in 4'x4' pieces, which would be plenty for two stands. I think this would be much easier than trying to glue veneer to MDF. MDF might work better for the base and pedestal though, if I can't figure out a good way to cover the plywood edges.

    Thanks again!
    Bryan
  • 02-28-2005, 12:28 PM
    PRJackson
    If you are interested, here are the stands I recently built for my ar.com's:

    http://members.tripod.com/omordicai/...peakerStd.html

    - PRJackson
  • 02-28-2005, 01:18 PM
    bcass
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by PRJackson
    If you are interested, here are the stands I recently built for my ar.com's:

    http://members.tripod.com/omordicai/...peakerStd.html

    - PRJackson

    Thanks! Those are some nice stands -- I like the design and your detailed description. I might just use that design myself. :-)

    Bryan
  • 02-28-2005, 06:58 PM
    Sir Terrence the Terrible
    Kex,
    Your talent continues to amaze me. That's all, go back to your jobs everyone
  • 03-01-2005, 11:11 AM
    ericl
    Cool K
    Nice work!

    You know, the gallery would be perfect for this. Or, if you would like to turn this into a "how-to" article that would be awesome too. I'd be happy to work with you on that.

    -Eric
  • 03-01-2005, 11:55 PM
    EFE Speakers
    Speaker Stands
    Hey guys,
    You not only did a nice job on the DIY speakers, but you built some very nice speaker stands to match, well done!

    Many that have built the AR.com DIY speakers have turned out some of the best looking bookshelf speakers I've seen anywhere! Then add the beautiful matching stands and they easily compete with much more expensive speakers in sound quality and looks.

    I'd love to see a gallery page dedicated to the AR.com DIY speaker projects that have been built by many over the last four years. It sounds like Eric might consider that? I could contact and have a number of the builders post pictures of their speakers. Perhaps posting an ad at this site requesting all builders of the DIY to come forward might help.

    Anyhow, great job on the speakers and stands you guys, enjoy the music!

    Ed Frias
    EFE TECHNOLOGY Speakers
  • 03-02-2005, 10:16 AM
    ericl
    Hi Ed,

    I'd be happy to put something together. Maybe I can create a special gallery section for it initially to collect shots and stuff, and then go from there.

    Eric


    ps, you've got mail.
  • 03-02-2005, 12:15 PM
    ericl
    OK Guys,

    Here's your place to show off:

    DIY Gallery

    Post your AudioReview.com Kit pics or any other DIY project..
    Spread the word!

    -Eric
  • 03-03-2005, 01:35 PM
    kexodusc
    PRjackson: Those are some sweet looking stands...
    About the speakers, that looks like oak veneer ( or a darn good vinyl laminate)...would you mind filling me in on what stains/varnishes you used?

    I'm doing a pair for a friend soon who wants something similar...thanks.
  • 03-03-2005, 01:38 PM
    kexodusc
    Man, I go to Boston for a few days, come back and suddenly old threads are getting all the attention AND there's a new DIY gallery...sweet.

    I just bought a half decent camera now too...I'll have to take some better pictures now.
  • 03-08-2005, 08:35 AM
    PRJackson
    Regarding my speakers - thanks for the interest! I glued 1/4" oak-veneered plywood from Home Depot over the MDF. I cut the edges at 45 degrees, and to my surprise, they actually fit pretty well once the edges are sanded down. Easier than I thought it would be, but you need to measure and cut very carefully.

    To finish them, I sanded to 220, and applied three coats of Tung oil and rubbed them down with 0000 steel wool between each coat, then buffed with cloth. I never got around to putting paste wax on.

    I made them about two years ago, so they have taken on a nice amber patina.

    I just finished my second pair of AR.com's - no pictures yet. This time I applied mahogany veneer to the MDF, finished with three coats of Watco Danish Oil, and they came out beautiful.

    I haven't decided yet whether the oak plywood or the veneering method was easier or quicker, but I do know that the plywood route is MUCH cheaper - but you are limited to oak or birch veneer. If you want exotic wood, it will cost between about $40 and $200 just for the veneer to do a pair of speakers.
  • 03-14-2005, 08:31 AM
    bcass
    Hey, now that's a good idea... 1/4" plywood instead of veneer. Oak is pretty versatile, as you can stain and finish it to mimic several other types of wood. So you had to miter the edges? Did you do that with a table saw? Maybe a 45-degree bevel router bit would work.

    Thanks, you got the mental gears turning again. Maybe I will make my own cabinets after all. :-)
  • 03-15-2005, 11:12 AM
    PRJackson
    I definitely would have used a table saw if I had one, but I don't, so I used my hand-held circular saw with guide boards and lots of clamping. I cut a scrap piece first to get an exact measuring device to position the cutting lines from the guides.

    Here are the tricks I learned:

    1) "Map out" which parts of the veneered sheet are going where. It looks best if the side-top-side is cut from one continous piece so the grain lines up. Leave about 1" around each edge for cutting. Practice each step on scrap before doing it for real.

    2) Lay the plywood veneer-side down and place a cabinet side on it and trace the edges with a pencil. Use this line as your cutting line for angle cut.

    3) The biggest problem with cutting veneered plywood is splintering. To eliminate that:

    a) Always cut with the good side down (or which ever side down so the blade is turning up into the veneer, not breaking out of the veneer).

    b) Use a many-toothed plywood blade, and don't use the same one too long (they are very cheap).

    c) This one really helps: make a masonite cover that screws onto the bottom plate of the saw with a slit just wide and long enough for the blade (use the saw to to cut the slit) so there is no gaps between the cover and the blade. (I also made one for my saber saw for cutting holes). I found this idea somewhere on the internet. It really helps.

    e) After everything is lined up and just before making the cut, try putting masking tape over the line on the veneer. This is important: remove the cut tape by peeling the tape from the board to the edge, not visa-versa or by peeding it down the cut, or you will cause it to splinter. Depending on the tape, this may cause more damage than it stops.

    4) Go very easy on the sanding - 220 max, and test on a scrap piece to see how much you can get away with before you sand through the veneer.

    Hope this helps!
  • 03-17-2005, 07:44 AM
    bcass
    Yes, that helps a lot, thank you! I do have a 10" plywood blade, so I'll use that. The zero-clearance saw insert is a good idea too, although I don't know if I can find masonite with the right thickness -- I'll have to look around. I think though that I will only veneer the side-top-side-bottom. The front and back I will paint black. So I at least don't have to worry about a 45-miter on all 4 sides of each panel. Well, wish me luck. :-)