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  1. #1
    You play. I listen. Enochrome's Avatar
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    Question Luxman PD-272 Repair

    Just bought a Luxman PD-272 for $35; cheapish because it needs some work.
    The biggest issue is that the pin on the green lead to the cartridge is missing.
    Does anyone know how to replace the leads on the tone arm?

    Here's a photo of the broken lead:



    Also, anyone know of any good cartridges around $100.00, less is cool, but not too much more?

    Any advice would be awesome!

  2. #2
    You play. I listen. Enochrome's Avatar
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    Figured it out: was as simple as changing the matt (Little research goes a long way).

    Now that I have it connected, I tested it out and the speed on the 33 setting is really slow. I tried adjusting the pitch, but it does not work. The strobe light indicates that it is not correct.
    Don't know what it could be? Bad motor?

  3. #3
    I took a headstart... basite's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enochrome
    Figured it out: was as simple as changing the matt (Little research goes a long way).

    Now that I have it connected, I tested it out and the speed on the 33 setting is really slow. I tried adjusting the pitch, but it does not work. The strobe light indicates that it is not correct.
    Don't know what it could be? Bad motor?
    how much to slow is it going?
    bad motor wouldn't be my first tought...

    I had A PD-282 before my lenco, when I first got it, the speed was also too slow when the pitch wheel was in the middle.
    I found 2 little pot meters/variable caps/resistors (whatever), they are 2 small white 'knobs', with a flat head groove in them (could be a philips head too, but I had flat heads), you can easily find them on the circuit bord. There is "33 1/3" and "45" rpm next to them on the circuit bord.

    You can adjust them, this will increase/decrease the motor speed. They are very much like the pitch adjuster, but only inside the turntable , you could adjust them with the turntable on, but be sure it's level and you can easily reach the knobs on the underside, without poking other stuff

    Good luck!
    It's a turntable worth looking after...

    btw, for your headshell leads, I don't know how you solved it, but you could solder a new cartidge clip on them (like on the others)...

    Keep them spinning,
    Bert.
    Life is music!

    Mcintosh MA6400 Integrated
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    I'm a happy 20 year old...

  4. #4
    You play. I listen. Enochrome's Avatar
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    Thanks for that post and the info! I tried my best to fix it: following your suggestions, but I could not get it to work. I took it to a local analog guru, who will let me know what the deal is. Hopefully, the repair won't be too expensive; love the look of the table and heard good things, but I have my financial limits. How do like your Denon cartridge? That is my next step.

  5. #5
    You play. I listen. Enochrome's Avatar
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    Well ,i took it to a specialist (not many left) and he said it had something to do with the motor. He said the job would cost $200 = Ouch. That is more than what the table is worth. Looks like it is sitting in the corner until I find some alternative. Man, why is turntable repair so expensive!!!!!?????

  6. #6
    You play. I listen. Enochrome's Avatar
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    Ok, so I am practically the only one on this thread, but I look at it as a if I am making a log of my experience on someone else's server Also, this is a result of all the good advice I have received on this site; so kudo's to all of you addicted vinyl vampires that are good souls.

    I have finally completed my Luxman PD 272 journey.

    Leaving off from my last thread, I took it to a specialist he wanted $200, that I could not afford, in order to fix it. The guy was cool, he's gotta make a livin, but that said I had to take it home. I asked about everything he found wrong: motor causing slow rotation, one of the rca's are shot, the bottom board needs to be replaced and the tone-arm needs adjustment.

    Came home to give a "once over" one last time, and strangely the rotation of the platter was fine. I thought to myself "did the guy fix that issue, because he felt bad that I could not afford it?" (stand up guy) Well if the motor works, maybe I'll give a go at the rca's (the left channel was out). Ok, so I told myself I have nothing to lose: it's trashed if I don't do anything and maybe I'll learn something if I try.

    Well, try I did: I gutted one end of some rca plugs and watched a bunch of You Tube video's on how to do it (on a Technic's 1200 no less), as well as read a bunch of articles.

    The experience:

    1. I suck at sodering.
    2. My circuit board on the Luxman is vertical. After my first attempt I realized it is much harder to soder vertically
    3. First attempt was hilarious: burned the cable insolation, my fingers and my patience. I got the left channel to work and now the right will not.
    4. While eating dinner, I realized it must have been a bad sodering job if the problem switched.
    5. 2nd attempt was a little less frustrating, but I would be laughed at for my technique.
    6. It worked. I cried (not really). I jumped around the apartment (really), blasted music all night long.
    7. Woke up the next morning, and put on a mellow Bert Jansch record, the left channel was out. I cursed till I had to go to work. I had a "don't talk to dad he's doing some plumbing" moment.

    At this point I did not want a working Luxman turntable, I wanted victory.

    8.And I even kicked it up a notch: forget connecting the rca's to the board, I'm going to install rca jacks directly to the table ( after seeing and working the guts of my table I was afraid I would rip the board out from the rca's).

    9. Went to my local Duvac Electronic store, sniffed out the most capable associate and the guy proceeded to tell me how to do it and gave me the parts. (kudo's to you Duvac man!)



    10. Spent all day today doing it; cursing, twisting. becoming a mad scientist during a beautiful day. After all the work, I went to the mall to pick up beer and some rca's ( I had gutted all the remaining one's I had).





    -Got back, drank a beer and plugged the rca's in, prayed and swilled, and beautiful stereo came out.





    It felt so good to accomplish something new, personal, and something to do with electronics. Even if it didn't work (but I am so glad it did), I received an intro to sodering, basic electronic circuitry, finally used You Tube for something productive, met some cool local experts ( an endorsement for the need of the dying "mom and pop" shops).

    I am addicted to vinyl and it's players, yet it is productive, what more can you ask for.

    -By the way my friends were floored, surprised, and proud that I went so deep and didn't throw the towel in and buy a new one.

    Sorry about the long post just wanted to share.*Thanks to all you sages of the black disc.*
    Last edited by Enochrome; 03-15-2010 at 10:16 PM.

  7. #7
    Retro Modernist 02audionoob's Avatar
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    Great story. I for one am very happy to hear it worked out for you. Luxman turntables are too nice to let go to waste.

  8. #8
    Forum Regular audio amateur's Avatar
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    Great job man, I know exactly the feeling of getting something like that to work again. Enjoy!

  9. #9
    You play. I listen. Enochrome's Avatar
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    Thanks audionoob and audio amateur!! it was an experience and I am listening to that table nonstop now.

  10. #10
    I took a headstart... basite's Avatar
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    Congrats

    Enjoy your luxman table now

    btw, you asked how I liked my cartridge?
    you mean the DL103, or the 304?

    I really like both cartridges, each has it's very own signature too.
    IMHO, the DL-103 is the biggest bargain in the cartridge world, it'll love the luxman's arm too I think
    Denon states that it's very neutral sounding, but it's slightly coloring, but if that is coloration, bring on the whole rainbow. very clear, very pleasant to listen too, pretty accurate, good tracking, very nice soundstage & good imaging. it needs a heavier arm though to function at its best, ideal for a vintage heavy armed turntable like yours

    I'd recommend it to everyone. skip the DL110 and 160 and go for the 103 with a decent phonostage. it's worth it. The 304 is another step up, better cart, more refined, more air around the different voices and instruments, harder to drive, and sometimes slightly less exiting as the 103, but it has it's obvious other advantages (being more refined, and theoretically, better sounding, it's also slightly quieter, it brings more peace in the system...)

    but really, go for the 103, you will not regret it.

    Keep them spinning,
    Bert.
    Life is music!

    Mcintosh MA6400 Integrated
    Double Advent speakers
    Thiel CS2.3's
    *DIY Lenco L75 TT
    * SME 3012 S2
    * Rega RB-301
    *Denon DL-103 in midas body
    *Denon DL-304
    *Graham slee elevator EXP & revelation
    *Lehmann audio black cube SE
    Marantz CD5001 OSE
    MIT AVt 2 IC's
    Sonic link Black earth IC's
    Siltech MXT New york IC's
    Kimber 4VS speakercable
    Furutech powercord and plugs.

    I'm a happy 20 year old...

  11. #11
    Forum Regular blackraven's Avatar
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    Great job! I hope you get many years of enjoyment out of it!
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  12. #12
    AR Newbie Registered Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enochrome
    Well ,i took it to a specialist (not many left) and he said it had something to do with the motor. He said the job would cost $200 = Ouch. That is more than what the table is worth. Looks like it is sitting in the corner until I find some alternative. Man, why is turntable repair so expensive!!!!!?????
    Can you let me know who this specialist is?

  13. #13
    You play. I listen. Enochrome's Avatar
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    Hi Red Grant,

    The place was "Audio Specialist" in Studio City. He was a really cool guy, I just could not
    bring myself to pay that amount considering I already paid the $95.00 estimation fee. I got lucky and had the time to fix almost everything that was wrong with it. I got lucky, because the main problem was that the motor was running slow, but when I got home from picking it up from Audio Specialist, it miraculously was working. To this day, I think that Howard at the shop secretly fixed it because he felt sorry for me that I could not afford to repair. I have nothing but good things to say about that place, just be prepared to invest some money in fixing your gear. And really, you should only consider it worthwhile, if you really love your gear or that it is worth a lot of money, and difficult to find a worthy replacement.

    Hope that helped.

    P.S. There is also Brooks Brendan Ltd. in Monrovia, and Solutions in Silverlake (incidently was the cover of an Elliot Smith album). Brooks Brendan are really nice and family business, but they are high-end. Solutions I have heard good things about (diligent and knowledgeable), but I have not been there.

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