• 11-18-2004, 07:02 AM
    bullseyekp
    Too many watts for old JBL L100s?
    I'm fairly audio ignorant so forgive me. I recently bought a Sony STR-DE897 receiver and plan on hooking up a simple surround sound package from JBL (http://www.soundandvisionmag.com/art...ber=2&preview=) and eventually getting a pair of JBL S310iis for music only.

    Until I can scrape up the extra $400 for the S310iis, I have a pair of JBL L100s that are older than I am. I have read that they are rated for 50 watts but the Sony receiver puts out 110 watts per channel. Am I going to fry the L100s by plugging them up or can I just manage the volume and prevent an overload? I really don't want to toast a pristine pair of vintage speakers that are still fairly valuable. Thanks for the help!
  • 11-18-2004, 09:49 AM
    Sir Terrence the Terrible
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by bullseyekp
    I'm fairly audio ignorant so forgive me. I recently bought a Sony STR-DE897 receiver and plan on hooking up a simple surround sound package from JBL (http://www.soundandvisionmag.com/art...ber=2&preview=) and eventually getting a pair of JBL S310iis for music only.

    Until I can scrape up the extra $400 for the S310iis, I have a pair of JBL L100s that are older than I am. I have read that they are rated for 50 watts but the Sony receiver puts out 110 watts per channel. Am I going to fry the L100s by plugging them up or can I just manage the volume and prevent an overload? I really don't want to toast a pristine pair of vintage speakers that are still fairly valuable. Thanks for the help!

    Fortunately for you before you can do any damage to the L100's, you would have killed yourself first. I have found that having too much power is not nearly as bad as not having enough, and the L100's are a VERY efficient speaker. My word of caution comes from loading these speakers(or any ported model) with too much deep bass. These speakers were made before hometheater ever existed(or as we know it). Soundtracks are pretty demanding in the deep bass, so be careful how load you play them with deep bass heavy tracks.
  • 11-18-2004, 12:41 PM
    bignerd100
    He is right about power misconceptions.

    That Sony receiver realy puts out about 15 watts of power at any given time. Watts are the product of amperage times voltage. Regular line Sony is very high voltage but low amperage. Amps do all of the work while volts do not. When buying speakers for your home theater you will want something in excess of 90dB efficent unless you have a very small room. These will not over tax you receiver. Try Kef or Celestion. The Celestion F15 is a great speaker for the money.

    If you have the opportunity to put a Jolida tube amp on your older JBL's you may find they do realy nice things you haven't heard them do before.
  • 11-19-2004, 07:04 AM
    bullseyekp
    Thanks for the replies. I actually found more info right after I posted.

    As for the setup, I'm leaning toward using JBL S-Series speakers to piecemeal a system using the S-Centerii, S26ii (rear surround) and either S310ii or S38ii (eventually) as front mains. A couple friends of mine use this setup and they are very pleased. My next question is related to the receiver and since this is the speaker forum, I'll post the same question in the main forum. I bought the Sony STR-DE897 because it was inexpensive but I now realize that it's probably not the quality I need for those speakers (or the L100s that I'll be using as mains in the interim). All of my friends use Onkyo or Yamaha and I've been looking at this (Onkyo TX-SR701) receiver as a replacement for the Sony. It is last year's 6.1 channel THX receiver. I have no intention on ever using 7.1 surround for years to come so this year's 7.1 channel models seem like a waste of money. Will the Onkyo (and its inherent superior quality) be worth the extra $200 over the Sony I already have and can easily sell?

    Many thanks from the audio neophyte!
  • 11-19-2004, 09:33 AM
    bignerd100
    Sure the Onkyo will sound better. It will also be easier to operate. The Sony DA1000ES is current, $600, and a great deal. It is better than any other receiver in the Sony line at the moment.

    Also check out the NAD T753. It is expensive but it gives you great flexability and much better sound quality, build quality, and USEABLE features than any of the rest.

    THX certification means nothing as far as sound uqality goes. Many products far exceed the requirements for THX certification yet do not have teh stamp on them. That is because they have to pay extra for that stamp and would prefer to put that money into better capacitors, resistors, or chipsets.
  • 11-19-2004, 04:13 PM
    pelly3s
    I just have to pipe in for a second and say don't replace you're L100's with a newer JBL trust me you will regret it. Even if you are gonna get the other ones save the L100's for stereo listening and use the other setup for home theater. I wouldnt waste my money on an Onkyo or another Sony without it being an ES. Look into an NAD for a receiver.
  • 11-25-2004, 06:27 AM
    rocknroll 81
    i hope that i am not mistaken,but the L100's should be 100 or 150 watt.i know that the L100T is 100 or 150 watts.it's been a while since i used a pair.all the T stands for is tall.L100 need to be put on stands,L100T are a floor model. Sir terrence is right,it is much better to have alot of clean power.if you were to crank up your speakers with a small power amp.the amp would start to distort at the higher output.that will blow a speaker before the high power amp will. i had a carver 200wpc amp and it rocked those L100T'S
  • 12-02-2004, 07:54 PM
    Glen Rasmussen
    speakers & power
    [As other have suggested, clean power will not overload those speakers. Clipping certainly will, if not enough power. If those speakers were reasonably stored and not exposed to direct sunlight with covers off they will outlive you again. The Jbl's are tough. I have powered my khorns with a car stereo before. Just listen for distortion and then cut it back some.
    razz