• 03-20-2005, 01:38 PM
    riceforlife
    Should I invest in a subwoofer?
    Hi all,

    I have an opportunity to invest in a used Velodyne VA-1012xII subwoofer for $150. I currently have a set of Athena AS-F2's as my mains. The Athenas are spec'd down to 35 Hz. The Velodyne is supposed to reach 28 Hz.

    I mainly listen to music (all kinds). Will I notice any difference by getting a sub? I'm tempted to, if anything, just because of the low price.

    Thanks for the feedback!
    - LD
  • 03-20-2005, 07:29 PM
    Rock789
    I have not herd that specific sub, but have herd the Velodyne DLS4000R which was very nice...

    a sub will help with music... the trick is to find one which can be blended well with your system... (not too much, not too little)

    are you able to listen to this sub? if it is too your liking, definately get it!

    Mike
  • 03-21-2005, 05:09 AM
    kexodusc
    Based on specs alone, I'd recommend you try this unit out first before buying if possible...There's just too many questions left unanswered looking at specs alone to tell if this $150 investment would yield worthwhile results.
    I'm not familiar with that sub, but, if it can give you reasonable bass output into the high 20 Hz region, it could lift a considerable burden off your speakers, which probably roll-off much higher than 35 Hz...you might notice a slight improvment in the midrange of your Athenas by relieving them of the bass frequencies.
    You won't know until you try...
  • 03-21-2005, 06:45 AM
    markw
    I'm using that same sub with a pair of F1's.
    It does make a difference. But, I only kick in in below 45 - 50 hz and run the mains full range.

    The secret to what you need to accomplish is to have it only take over only below where the mains can't handle it, not to augment the bass on the mains. If there is too much overlap. it WILL sound bassy and thuddy.

    In your case, I'd say that the sub's low pass filter might nees to be set a little lower.
  • 03-21-2005, 07:05 AM
    shokhead
    I'll sell you my Klipsch if you pick it up. 200 bucks.
  • 03-21-2005, 01:17 PM
    riceforlife
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by markw
    It does make a difference. But, I only kick in in below 45 - 50 hz and run the mains full range.

    The secret to what you need to accomplish is to have it only take over only below where the mains can't handle it, not to augment the bass on the mains. If there is too much overlap. it WILL sound bassy and thuddy.

    In your case, I'd say that the sub's low pass filter might nees to be set a little lower.

    Hi Markw,

    Thanks for your response. Out of curiosity, how do you have the Velodyne hooked up? Through line-level or speaker-level connections? My amp doesn't have a subwoofer out, so I was thinking of just using a speaker-level connection. But, I've also been thinking of using this as an excuse to invest in a receiver with a subwoofer out (maybe the HK-3480).

    Would you mind also Markw elaborating on what kind of difference you notice? Unfortunately, I cannot try the subwoofer with my speakers - I'm buying it used - and so I won't be able to tell how the sub affects my music.

    Finally, this is my first time buying a subwoofer (and like I mentioned, I'm buying it used.) Is there anything I should look for when I go to pick it up, to make sure its in good condition (i.e. check to see no tears, nothing rattling, etc)?

    Thanks!
    - LD
  • 03-21-2005, 01:17 PM
    riceforlife
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by shokhead
    I'll sell you my Klipsch if you pick it up. 200 bucks.

    Hey sorry, I'm in sunny NYC - won't be able to pick it up :)
  • 03-21-2005, 01:56 PM
    markw
    My hookup.
    When I has this hooked up to my "stereo" system, I had it hooked in between the preamp out and the main in, via a pair of "Y" connectors, and in parallel to the main amp. I sent the full range to both the maons and the sub. I usedthe sub's low pass filter to keep the highs out andthe speakers were well behaved enough to simply ignore whatever bass they could not handle.

    If the line level idea is not an option, you might want to try hooking it up in parallel wit hthe mains and simply using the low pass filter as I did.

    http://cgi.audioasylum.com/systems/1606.html

    Since I've removed it from the stereo system and it's now dedicated to the HT, I've got it hooked up through the LFE channel on my Denon 2802, again wit hthe low pass simply cutting in below 45 hz or so. The F1's are run full range.

    when properly integrated, it's a fairy subtle difference which only manifests itself (musicaly) when there is material that's below the range my mains can handle, such as deep organs, synth, fretless bass, and some oddball sound effects that some recordings throw in.

    I'm only a 25 minute train ride fromPenn Station on NJT NE Corridor/Coast lines if you want to hear it.
  • 03-21-2005, 02:07 PM
    Woochifer
    Aside from the obvious gain in low frequency extension, the benefit to using a subwoofer is the placement flexibility that it allows. Optimal main speaker placement typically occurs along the middle of the front wall, while maximum bass reinforcement occurs in the corners. The best place for main speakers to image properly is typically also the location where the bass is weakest, so even if the sub gives you less than a half-octave gain in bass extension, it can be placed in the location where the reinforcement of the lows is the best.

    With subs, the corner placement can sometimes result in overly boomy bass, but you still have the entire room to try out and find the best spot for the sub. Another benefit to subwoofers is that you can connect them to an external parametric equalizer or other room optimizing device that corrects room induced peaking in the bass. The room effects increase as you move into the lower frequencies, and the way that bass waves interact can create boomy peaks and/or cancellations at specific frequencies. The subwoofer gives you the best chance at correcting for these problems.

    I have a set of speakers that I have measured down to 35 Hz in-room, and my subwoofer specs down to 27 Hz. While it may not seem like much, the added extension adds a lot of impact to the bass. Because my room is not large, the subwoofer also picks up a lot of room gain at the low end, which brings the actual extension in the bass closer to 22 Hz. I also use a parametric equalizer to correct for room induced problems, which makes the entire bass range sound more even, including those parts of the bass range that my main speaker formerly played before I crossed over the signal with my receiver.
  • 03-21-2005, 07:42 PM
    hmmmm
    "I also use a parametric equalizer to correct for room induced problems, which makes the entire bass range sound more even, including those parts of the bass range that my main speaker formerly played before I crossed over the signal with my receiver."

    What equalizer do you use? The Beringer?
  • 03-25-2005, 10:15 AM
    riceforlife
    Update:

    I bought the subwoofer last night (my girlfriend and I lugged it over 120 city blocks via public transportation!)

    I have it temporarily hooked up to a pair of bookshelf speakers. It sounds glorious. Thanks all for your opinions.