Rookie AMP question

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  • 03-05-2004, 08:43 PM
    T-Bone
    Rookie AMP question
    Alright... now I am sure to show my rookie stripe:

    My speakers are set up for biwiring (Visonik Evolution)... my integrated amp has pre-outs (Creek 4330 MKII)...

    If I want to bi-wire my speakers, do I need to look into a pre-amp, or a power amp? Does the amp color the signal at all?

    Any advice is more information than I had before I started out...

    Thanks... T-Bone
  • 03-05-2004, 08:55 PM
    spacedeckman
    You would need an amp
    If Creek doesn't make one to match, then you would probably have to search for one with variable gain to allow a match in output. Or trial and error...not recommended unless someone else has done some of the homework.
  • 03-05-2004, 09:10 PM
    RGA
    You'd only need an another amp if you were to biamp your speaker. Bi-Wiring a speaker does not require another amplifier. Bi-amping makes some sense - bi-wiring less so. All you're doing with bi wiring is splitting the signal directly to each driver. The theory is that bass signals go to the bass driver and the treble signals go to the treble driver. Of course this is thrown out the window on any three way speaker...and of course there is no way for a frequency to know which cable to follow...which is why Bi-wiring is often classed as a snake-oil practice. They get to sell not one over hyped useless and expensive set of cables - NO - now they get to sell you two such cables. There is more profit for a retailer in $60.00 cables than $600.00 Televisions.

    Heck I'm surprised there is no tri-wiring-quad wiring and octag-wiring. Shhh...better not say it too loud Monster Cable might be watching.
  • 03-05-2004, 09:16 PM
    zapr
    .........You don't need another amp to biwire. Simply run two sets of wire to each speaker. Remove the jumper bars and connect one set to the upper posts and the other to the lower posts.........Zapr.
  • 03-06-2004, 07:03 AM
    spacedeckman
    He means "Bi amp" I should have corrected but read post
    for definition of what he wanted.

    I agree, bi/tri wiring isn't huge deal, although I have done it due to ability and the fact that my speakers are missing jumpers. Made jumpers later on, but wire was "bi-able" so I just did it that way out of sheer laziness.

    Bi amping is very cool. I have heard it work very well. The bigger version of my speakers were tri-ampable. A few years back dealer in another city had demo with them tri-amped with 3 Arcam Alpha 9 amps. He even started with single amp for me and added another between demos. 3 was mighty good.

    Someday, active biamp on my system, Ole has an active designed for my speakers. Just need another amp and more money....sound familiar.
  • 03-06-2004, 07:37 AM
    T-Bone
    Now More Informed
    Thanks for the advice people... great stuff.

    I guess now I should clarify that I want to bi-amp the speakers. Creek does not make one, so it looks as though I must search for one. I have heard some good things about Bryston... would that do the trick? Also, since I am only powering bookshelf speakers, will I need one the has a pile of power?

    Any suggestions?

    Thanks in advance... T-Bone
  • 03-06-2004, 11:18 AM
    92135011
    Actually with regard to biwire....I have heard many who say NO to it.
    Even Sonus Faber, a pretty high end Italian speaker company doesnt come with biwiring capability.
    Plus, when you spending over 1000 bux a pair of cables, an extra wire is gonna HURT big time.
  • 03-06-2004, 01:17 PM
    zapr
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by T-Bone
    Thanks for the advice people... great stuff.

    I guess now I should clarify that I want to bi-amp the speakers. Creek does not make one, so it looks as though I must search for one. I have heard some good things about Bryston... would that do the trick? Also, since I am only powering bookshelf speakers, will I need one the has a pile of power?

    Any suggestions?

    Thanks in advance... T-Bone

    .......If you are powering bookshelf speakers I would assume they are rated at 150 watts or there about? You could look for a multi-channel power amp and use its separate channels to biamp your speakers. That may be the most cost effective. Each channel will then have the same tonal characteristics. 30 - 50 watts per channel would be sufficiant. Complete separate amps works best for the best channel separation but at a higher price depending on the brand. There are a lot of guys here with good knowledge on this stuff so read on..........Zapr.
  • 03-06-2004, 01:46 PM
    zapr
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by RGA
    You'd only need an another amp if you were to biamp your speaker. Bi-Wiring a speaker does not require another amplifier. Bi-amping makes some sense - bi-wiring less so. All you're doing with bi wiring is splitting the signal directly to each driver. The theory is that bass signals go to the bass driver and the treble signals go to the treble driver. Of course this is thrown out the window on any three way speaker...and of course there is no way for a frequency to know which cable to follow...which is why Bi-wiring is often classed as a snake-oil practice. They get to sell not one over hyped useless and expensive set of cables - NO - now they get to sell you two such cables. There is more profit for a retailer in $60.00 cables than $600.00 Televisions.

    Heck I'm surprised there is no tri-wiring-quad wiring and octag-wiring. Shhh...better not say it too loud Monster Cable might be watching.

    .......True a frequency does'nt know which cable to follow, but, in a biwire setup the treble region and bass region (speakers) draw from the amp is kept separate reducing distortion more so in the treble region. More instrument separation and air was the result I noticed. It's not what was gained but what was lost that was significant. Some brands may have results that are more benificial than others. Anyway, that's my take on it........Zapr.