Need to know about Hz

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  • 02-22-2007, 06:55 PM
    Hashpot
    Need to know about Hz
    I know Hz stands for cycles per second but how does the amount of Hz change the way a speaker sounds. I was reading a sub thread and someone was talking about how they wanted a sub with 60-120Hz how does Hs affect the sound? lets say a sub has a range of 70-160 would i get more bass?
  • 02-22-2007, 07:38 PM
    audio_dude
    hmm, what you're thinking of is frequency of sound...

    for example, most people say the human ear can hear from 20hz to 20000hz...

    the average bookshelf speaker goes down to about 60 or 70hz.

    20hz is that low rumble of an explosion and such things.

    when saying they wanted a sub with 60-120hz, they meant the highpass filter, which is the point where the sub stops playing and the speakers fill in.

    for subs, most go down to at least 30hz, and as you progress through bigger drivers and amps, some go down to 20hz and beyond that even.

    hope this helps remove some of this fog!
  • 02-22-2007, 09:21 PM
    Dusty Chalk
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Hashpot
    ... a sub with 60-120Hz how does Hs affect the sound? lets say a sub has a range of 70-160 would i get more bass?

    No, actually that would be less -- the one that goes down to 60 goes lower than the one that goes down to 70. The upper crossover just helps in blending with the regular (non-subwoofer) speakers.
  • 02-23-2007, 04:46 AM
    basite
    yeah, Hz is the frequency,

    a piano for example, has a very wide frequency range some can go from 25 Hz to 4100 Hz (4.1 kHz)

    which means that the lowest note the piano can reach is 24 hz and the highest note is 4100 Hz,


    Keep them spinning,
    Bert.
  • 02-23-2007, 04:55 AM
    Luvin Da Blues
    This may help...its from a EQ manual

    Center frequency (Hz)
    1/3 octave
    Effects on music

    31 to 63
    Fundamentals of bass drum, tuba, double bass and organ.
    These frequencies give music a sense of power. If overemphasised
    they make the music "muddy". The 50 or
    60 Hz band is also used to reject AC mains hum.

    80 to 125
    Fundamentals of lower tympani. Too much boost produces
    excessive "boom". 100 or 125 Hz are also used for hum
    rejection.

    160 to 250
    Drum and lower bass. Too much boost produces
    excessive "boom". Also useful for 3rd harmonic mains hum
    rejection.

    315 to 500 Fundamentals of strings and percussion.

    630 to 1k
    Fundamentals and harmonics of strings, keyboards and
    percussion. Boosting the 600 to 1 kHz range can make
    instruments sound horn-like.

    1.25k to 4k
    Drums, guitar, accentuation of vocals, strings and bass.
    Too much boost in the 1 to 2 kHz range can make
    instuments sound tinny. Too much boost anywhere
    between 1 to 4 kHz can produce "listening fatigue".

    5k to 8k
    Accentuation of percussion, cymbals and snare drum.
    Reduction at 5 kHz makes overall sound more distant and
    transparent. Reduction of tape hiss and system noise. The
    1.25 to 8 kHz governs clarity and definition.

    10k to 16k
    Cymbals and overall brightness. Too much boost causes
    sibilance. Reduction of tape hiss and system noise.