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  1. #1
    ride a jet ski Tarheel_'s Avatar
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    How to refurbish old speakers?

    Not quite sure where this goes...

    I've found some interesting older speakers on my local craigslist. Most of them need re foaming or other attention.

    Is there a good DIY site or article to educate me?

    thanks all.

  2. #2
    Forum Regular luvtolisten's Avatar
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    I would just do a google search for "refoaming speakers" then hit the video icon. You'll find a bunch of them.

    Wooferrepair.com will sell you a kit that includes a "how to" DVD (lees than $30). The kit contains everything you'll need except an exacto knife and rubbing alcohol (91% works best) to remove the old surround. I would recommend this kit, if it's your first time.
    Just to let you know the glue used is nothing more than all-purpose craft glue,(Aleene's or Elmer's). Goes on white but dries clear. Takes less time to cure then some of the glues on the videos. Spread it on each surface evenly to be glued together, wait 5 minutes, then press them together. After 20 minutes it has cured.

  3. #3
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    several good ones on youtube

  4. #4
    Chicago IL
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    Yeah do a google search like luvtolisten said. Before I didn't know how to do that refoaming too but now I can perfectly do it. Just read the instructions and follow them. I have refoamed many speakers like Cerwin Vega, Scott, Pioneer and etc. Good luck

  5. #5
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    Some kits/videos will say that you can leave the dust cap in place but that is a very risky approach. To be sure you do it right you really need to cut the cap partially and peel it back in order to shim the voice coil. The tiny curved manicure scissors are helpful in cutting the dust cap after you've made the incision with an Exacto blade. If you shine a strong light on the cap you can better see how to angle the initial incision. Elmers glue works great and dries clear.

    It's not a difficult process but it's best to take your time and not rush things.

  6. #6
    Forum Regular luvtolisten's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poultrygeist
    Some kits/videos will say that you can leave the dust cap in place but that is a very risky approach. To be sure you do it right you really need to cut the cap partially and peel it back in order to shim the voice coil. The tiny curved manicure scissors are helpful in cutting the dust cap after you've made the incision with an Exacto blade. If you shine a strong light on the cap you can better see how to angle the initial incision. Elmers glue works great and dries clear.

    It's not a difficult process but it's best to take your time and not rush things.
    Agreed, first time you may want to shim, to get a feel of the voice coil, and to prevent rubbing.

    As stated, it's not a difficult process, but patience is your best friend.

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