• 12-09-2003, 08:18 AM
    stereophonicfan
    Don't know if i'm in the right place, but...
    Don't know if i'm in the right place, but...

    I grew up with a marantz pm700 (8Ohm-95watts & 4Ohm-155watts/ channel) and a pair of Wharfedale 'dovedale 3' speakers.
    Several years ago my father passed the entire stereo-set over to me.
    Like any (amateur) audiophile I never quite got over the sound of those Wharfedales (it seemed so big when I was only 'so' little!).

    For a while now I've been searching the Net for a second pair of these speakers, believing that two pairs can be more than four speakers!
    Ebay was a disappointment!
    I've also contacted the Wharfedale-admin. but they we're unable to help me due to the age of this model.

    They are typical mid/late-seventies speakers (with frequencyfilters, knowing that earlier one's worked without filters!) ! and total enclosure, woven frontpanel, etc. I myself have maintenanced my pair of dovedales wonderfully and handled them with care, they still give an unblemished sound without any flaws.

    I would be ever so grateful if,
    -you can direct me towards an owner of another pair of 'Dovedale 3's' , interested in selling a fully functional pair as unblemished as possible without any technical flaws!
    -you can share with me you're first encounter with (audiophile) sound or your best experiences in the audiophile world

    thx for reading/replying, do remember I am a humble amateur!
  • 12-14-2003, 01:49 PM
    zapr
    Chances are you won't find these speakers because of age. Speakers have come a long way since the seventies. Why not audition some speakers of today?
  • 12-16-2003, 01:36 AM
    stereophonicfan
    well...
    I though I'd take a chance of finding a pair. You're quite right, age is a difficulty. Still, maybe.

    I still have my pair in near mint condition.

    Thanks for replying!
  • 12-17-2003, 03:06 PM
    Kursun
    My first hi-fi speakers were kit built Wharfedale Glendales (1974). They were a less expensive version of the Glendales, with a 10" woofer instead of 12", and different tweeter. They sounded so bad I still shiver when I think about them.

    Many years later, one day I threw out everything inside to trash, put in new drivers and a new crossover, and it sounded so much better that I had wondered why Wharfedale couldn't build a better speaker in the first place! That started my hobby of DIY speakers. :)
  • 12-17-2003, 08:53 PM
    RGA
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by stereophonicfan
    I though I'd take a chance of finding a pair. You're quite right, age is a difficulty. Still, maybe.

    I still have my pair in near mint condition.

    Thanks for replying!

    No this is the wrong forum. You want to go here http://www.audioasylum.com/forums/vintage/bbs.html

    Vintage Wharfedale is very popular depending on model and someone should be able to help you out.

    My speakers are inspired from the 1970s...and I found them to be considerably better than current B&W, Paradigm, Energy, ML, Sonus Faber, Legacy, Apogee, Mirage, Vandersteen and a about 2 dozen others.

    The fact they're an old design doesn't hurt them depending on the design. What hurt some of them though was the quality of the actual drivers and the crossovers.

    The Sugden A21 circa 1965 is still selling today and is still considered to be the best "sounding" integrated amp for $1500.00US by Hi-fi choice, Stereophile, What Hi-fi and right up there in TAS etc.

    The original A21 was 10 watts pure class A SS amp that was limited by resistors and other parts that could not withstand a ht running class a amp. In 1989, Sugden added some features and connections and with much better parts material revamped the A21 and turned it into the A21a and boosted it to 25watts. This amps has been selling every year since 1989, and look at the reviews in Stereophile, TAS' latest issue. They finally got around to revieing it.

    The Sugden Masterclass Integrated amp is a third revamp of the A21a and now has 35 watts of class A power and finally a Remote control and far superior build quality. And once it again it keeps getting raves. I don't go by reviews but I have heard the A21a and I would love to have it...being picky, this is the highest praise I can give it. A supercharged A21a would have me drooling except the 7kCDN price. Zoinks Scooby.
    http://www.audiosynergy.co.uk/a21arev.htm
    The point, old "GOOD" designs had no problems whatsover. A lot of new stuff is there to maximize profit and sell garbage in that pursuit. A lot of new stuff is excellent. I don't know where Wharfedale fits,
  • 12-18-2003, 04:09 AM
    stereophonicfan
    I have to say...
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Kursun
    My first hi-fi speakers were kit built Wharfedale Glendales (1974). They were a less expensive version of the Glendales, with a 10" woofer instead of 12", and different tweeter. They sounded so bad I still shiver when I think about them.

    Many years later, one day I threw out everything inside to trash, put in new drivers and a new crossover, and it sounded so much better that I had wondered why Wharfedale couldn't build a better speaker in the first place! That started my hobby of DIY speakers. :)

    The fact that those Wharfedales sounded inadequate is very possible. This is probably not because they were cheaper but because it's typical of Wharfedale to create different series of speakers, some were (are) good and others were (are) terrible. Also, wharfedales from the seventies did not all have a proper crossoverunits, some smaller and older models even had none. I, personally, think I'm lucky with the Dovedales although I have to say it's a typical sound very unlike todays standards.

    There's only one rule when purchasing a speaker set or surr. system, go out to listen to them before buying them.
  • 12-18-2003, 04:12 AM
    stereophonicfan
    thanks for the very helpful reply
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by RGA
    No this is the wrong forum. You want to go here http://www.audioasylum.com/forums/vintage/bbs.html

    Vintage Wharfedale is very popular depending on model and someone should be able to help you out.

    My speakers are inspired from the 1970s...and I found them to be considerably better than current B&W, Paradigm, Energy, ML, Sonus Faber, Legacy, Apogee, Mirage, Vandersteen and a about 2 dozen others.

    The fact they're an old design doesn't hurt them depending on the design. What hurt some of them though was the quality of the actual drivers and the crossovers.

    The Sugden A21 circa 1965 is still selling today and is still considered to be the best "sounding" integrated amp for $1500.00US by Hi-fi choice, Stereophile, What Hi-fi and right up there in TAS etc.

    The original A21 was 10 watts pure class A SS amp that was limited by resistors and other parts that could not withstand a ht running class a amp. In 1989, Sugden added some features and connections and with much better parts material revamped the A21 and turned it into the A21a and boosted it to 25watts. This amps has been selling every year since 1989, and look at the reviews in Stereophile, TAS' latest issue. They finally got around to revieing it.

    The Sugden Masterclass Integrated amp is a third revamp of the A21a and now has 35 watts of class A power and finally a Remote control and far superior build quality. And once it again it keeps getting raves. I don't go by reviews but I have heard the A21a and I would love to have it...being picky, this is the highest praise I can give it. A supercharged A21a would have me drooling except the 7kCDN price. Zoinks Scooby.
    http://www.audiosynergy.co.uk/a21arev.htm
    The point, old "GOOD" designs had no problems whatsover. A lot of new stuff is there to maximize profit and sell garbage in that pursuit. A lot of new stuff is excellent. I don't know where Wharfedale fits,


    Thanks for the link, I'll be sure to visit that forum on audioasylum.
    I see your a big fan of A-class amplification, so am I.
    I have, however, never heard of Sugden but I'm always prepared to learn, that's what this forum is for!
    I believe the pm8000 with A-class operation I use is indeed somewhat more commercial, but that doesn't bother me. Matters of taste and dedication to a brand!

    Once more, thanks for the link!
  • 12-18-2003, 10:21 AM
    Kursun
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by stereophonicfan
    The fact that those Wharfedales sounded inadequate is very possible. This is probably not because they were cheaper but because it's typical of Wharfedale to create different series of speakers, some were (are) good and others were (are) terrible. Also, wharfedales from the seventies did not all have a proper crossoverunits, some smaller and older models even had none. I, personally, think I'm lucky with the Dovedales although I have to say it's a typical sound very unlike todays standards.

    There's only one rule when purchasing a speaker set or surr. system, go out to listen to them before buying them.

    You are quite right. I think Glendales were just an interim model which Wharfedale seeked to capitalize on the long lasting success of the Dovedales.

    One factor I think you should take into consideration is that most speakers that were developed before the 80's had power handling capabilities of around 30-60W which is really limiting.
  • 12-20-2003, 08:21 AM
    stereophonicfan
    Nowadays...
    Nowadays Wharfedales are totally unlike they used to be. But you can't really blame the manufacturers since they had evolve, and modernise their models to new demands and new formats; like the first CD's when these speakers where used to receive a vinyl induced and amplified signal.

    Again, wether you like the new or old ones, that's just a matter of taste and feeling.

    It's true however, unlike other brands, that Wharfedale is a champion at making sure that successors of a previous serie are totally different.
  • 06-05-2007, 02:11 PM
    tcb0001
    I've got some
    Hello,
    I've got a pair of Wharfedale Dovedale 3's. I jusy got them from a friend and I haven't hooked them up to my stereo yet but I'm not sure I've got the room for them. They are slightly unusual in that somebody has attached some curved feet onto the cabinets. I've been assured they work fine and on inspection they appear to be in very good condition except for tops of the cabinet which need a sand down and repolishing, maybe the whole cabinets. I'll fire them up tomorrow and see how they sound, if you're interested you could makle me an offer?
    Regards
    Trev