Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: USB Turntables

  1. #1
    Musicaholic Forums Moderator ForeverAutumn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Location: Location
    Posts
    9,604

    USB Turntables

    Hey guys, I have a friend who asked me to ask you whether anyone here has experience using USB turntables on a Mac. He's looking for advice and recommendations.

    Can anyone here help? Thanks.

  2. #2
    I put the Gee in Gear.... thekid's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    VB VA
    Posts
    2,525
    FA

    Can't speak to using on with a Mac but I so have a Sony USB TT that I am currently using with a PC to convert my vinyl to CD. It is an extremely easy set-up so I can't imagine it would be any differerent an experience with a Mac. TT comes with its own software that once loaded pretty much makes it a plug and play experience. I have not looked to see if the software is Mac compatible but even if was not there are plenty of other similar programs out there that I am sure are Mac compatible. TT is not something I would use in my everyday system but it is decent. I run with a Kenwood Basic M1D/C2 amp/pre-amp combo and the only difference between that and a regular set-up is that there is a USB cable that runs from the back of the TT to the PC. There are other brands of USB TT out there besides the Sony but I would stay away from the bottom of the line Ion and NuMark models.

    With any LP in moderate shape it produces great sound IMO. Even LP's that have a few pops and scratches can produce a good recording because the software can minimize or eliminate alot of what would normally be heard if you were spinning it on the TT.

    Hope that little bit helps!

  3. #3
    Vinyl Fundamentalist Forums Moderator poppachubby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Analog Synagogue
    Posts
    4,396
    Quote Originally Posted by ForeverAutumn
    Hey guys, I have a friend who asked me to ask you whether anyone here has experience using USB turntables on a Mac. He's looking for advice and recommendations.

    Can anyone here help? Thanks.
    Can you be more specific FA? What's the prob? And which table has he got? My friend has a Mac with a Stanton USB...if he's looking for a USB turbtable, direct him to this thread...USB Turntable

    Let me know...

  4. #4
    Musicaholic Forums Moderator ForeverAutumn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Location: Location
    Posts
    9,604
    No problems to solve. He doesn't have a TT yet. He's just decided that he wants to listen to his old vinyl and is investigating his TT options, I think.

  5. #5
    Stone Stone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    1,582
    I haven't used the USB TTs, but if it were me, and I wanted to listen to the vinyl, in addition to converting it to digital, I'd skip the USB TT, and buy a decent standard TT first, then later an adapter and software for a USB connection.

    Or did I miss what his intent is?
    And the world will turn to flowing pink vapor stew.

  6. #6
    Musicaholic Forums Moderator ForeverAutumn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Location: Location
    Posts
    9,604
    I checked with him to find out exactly what he wants it for. It's strictly for converting vinyl to digital. Not for listening.

    In his own words, "I am a complete devotee of the holy ipod...high fidelity is less of a concern than is mobility".

  7. #7
    Retro Modernist 02audionoob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    2,944
    An adapter like the iMic would allow him to plug in any turntable he wants, without being limited to USB models. Audacity can be downloaded for free and would be suitable for recording the input from the iMic. That device could be paired with a turntable that produces a line level output, like the Denon DP-29F or DP-300F, or with a phono preamp like the Audio-Technica AT-PEQ3 and a turntable with the standard phono level output.

    http://audacity.sourceforge.net/download/mac

    http://www.griffintechnology.com/products/imic

    http://www.usa.denon.com/ProductDetails/529.asp

    http://www.usa.denon.com/ProductDetails/3145.asp

    http://www.lpgear.com/Merchant2/merc...tegory_Code=PP

  8. #8
    Close 'n PlayŽ user Troy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Highway 6, between Tonopah and Ely
    Posts
    2,319
    If he doesn't care about hi fi that much (like me) then do what I did cuz it's practically FREE:

    In my office where my computer is, I've had a series of 70s analog amps/receivers that I run the computer through. I went to radio shack and bought a wire with RCA plugs at one end and the mini headphone jack on the other. I used the computer's 'line out' (just a headphones plug) and plugged it into one of the aux's on the amp. So now, my iTunes plays thru this amp and speakers in my office. Sounds great.

    Next to the line out jack on the back of the computer is a 'line in' jack as well. So if you want to record into the computer, just switch the plug from 'line out' to 'line in'. Connect your regular TT (or a cassette deck, open reel, 8-track, wire recorder, etc.) to that receiver and record it into the computer. Cake.

    I haven't done this in a while, but when I did I used Spin Doctor (comes bundled with Toast) to record in the computer. Audacity (freeware) is excellent for editing the recorded files.

  9. #9
    Vinyl Fundamentalist Forums Moderator poppachubby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Analog Synagogue
    Posts
    4,396
    Quote Originally Posted by 02audionoob
    An adapter like the iMic would allow him to plug in any turntable he wants, without being limited to USB models. Audacity can be downloaded for free and would be suitable for recording the input from the iMic. That device could be paired with a turntable that produces a line level output, like the Denon DP-29F or DP-300F, or with a phono preamp like the Audio-Technica AT-PEQ3 and a turntable with the standard phono level output.

    http://audacity.sourceforge.net/download/mac

    http://www.griffintechnology.com/products/imic

    http://www.usa.denon.com/ProductDetails/529.asp

    http://www.usa.denon.com/ProductDetails/3145.asp

    http://www.lpgear.com/Merchant2/merc...tegory_Code=PP
    ...here! Here!! I gotta say noob, damn your good! FA this is fantastic advice for your friend. Although I'm sure he wants nothing to do with anything other than his Ipod, this set up puts him in a versatile scenario which considers quality, value and even re-sale if he reaches "the end" of his project. You could inter change some of these products for others, if availability is a problem, there are similar pieces in the same price range.

    I am currently digitizing vinyl with a Creative Sound Blaster 24bit Audigy Platinum sound card and a Pioneer PL 516 through a Bellario VP 130. I am using Audacity. There is a great Wiki for this program here... http://wiki.audacityteam.org/index.php?title=Tutorials

  10. #10
    Vinyl Fundamentalist Forums Moderator poppachubby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Analog Synagogue
    Posts
    4,396
    Quote Originally Posted by Troy
    If he doesn't care about hi fi that much (like me) then do what I did cuz it's practically FREE:

    In my office where my computer is, I've had a series of 70s analog amps/receivers that I run the computer through. I went to radio shack and bought a wire with RCA plugs at one end and the mini headphone jack on the other. I used the computer's 'line out' (just a headphones plug) and plugged it into one of the aux's on the amp. So now, my iTunes plays thru this amp and speakers in my office. Sounds great.

    Next to the line out jack on the back of the computer is a 'line in' jack as well. So if you want to record into the computer, just switch the plug from 'line out' to 'line in'. Connect your regular TT (or a cassette deck, open reel, 8-track, wire recorder, etc.) to that receiver and record it into the computer. Cake.

    I haven't done this in a while, but when I did I used Spin Doctor (comes bundled with Toast) to record in the computer. Audacity (freeware) is excellent for editing the recorded files.
    Did you use a pre amp too or just direct? I don't understand how the computer would deal with the receivers analog signal without some kind of processing. Surely the sound must have been REALLY poor although I understand we are discussing non hi fidelity. Curious...

  11. #11
    Close 'n PlayŽ user Troy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Highway 6, between Tonopah and Ely
    Posts
    2,319
    Nope, no need for a pre-amp. It sounded great, actually. Think of it like recording from the FM onto tape back in the old days.

  12. #12
    Stainmaster Finch Platte's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Fumbuck
    Posts
    2,384
    Quote Originally Posted by Troy
    Nope, no need for a pre-amp. It sounded great, actually. Think of it like recording from the FM onto tape back in the old days.
    And stop calling him Shirley!

  13. #13
    Musicaholic Forums Moderator ForeverAutumn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Location: Location
    Posts
    9,604
    I sent the link for this thread to my friend. He said he'd take a look at it this weekend. If he has any questions I'll pass them along...or better yet, try to convince him to register here and ask them himself.

    Thanks for your help boys.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Latest AudioReview Articles

Hot Deals

Latest News

AudioReview on Facebook