• 08-29-2006, 07:17 AM
    Davey
    Tunesday Tunes and Miscellaneous Ramblings about Life in the Foodchain
    Life in the Foodchain! Hey, that was a pretty nice record, back in the days when LP and record and album all were used interchageably to describe the same slice of black vinyl. Then came the big comet and out went the big lizards. But as one of the surviving dinos, pulled out some aging vinyl last week and one was old Tonio K and his debut. Man, that was some smoking band he had! Where'd they come from? Where'd they go?

    Anyway, mostly some of the usual suspects for me the past week, but sprinkled amongst the aging wrecks were some choice bits of Rave Recs history in the aforementioned Manitoba and Bark Psychosis, and also the not aforementioned but cooler than any of my words could ever be David Kilgour & the Heavy Eights discs. And that always loveable Twilight compilation by one of the old Rave Wrecking Crew made a triumphant return to my CD player this week. Wow. What a lineup. What a collection. What a visionary!

    Of all the things you said you wanted to do
    There was only one time when I wouldn't let you
    Of all the things that you said you wanted to be
    I remember the last thing you promised me
    You said, "I... would have married... you"


    Also dragged out one of the recent CRSVx discs and that was a fun listen. You guys and girls are all so weird and wacky :)
  • 08-29-2006, 07:58 AM
    ForeverAutumn
    Well, I spent last week on vacation with BarryL so my week included a lot of wild and interesting listens from his iPod. Including such past hits as The Candyman and Zippidy-do-dah.

    ....makes my ears happy that I don't have kids. :lol:

    Listens of my own choice included...

    Mercury Rev - The Secret Migration of Birds
    Matchbook Romance - Voices
    Three Days Grace - One X
    Ray Lamontagne - Trouble
    Ryan Adams - Cold Roses (disk one)
    British Sea Power - Open Season
    Colin James - Traveller
    Hot Hot Heat - Elevator
    Jamie Cullum - Twentysomething
    Katie Melua - Call of the Search and Piece by Piece
    Sister Hazel - S/T
  • 08-29-2006, 08:28 AM
    audiobill
    Hooray!!
    Hooray for the Tuesday Thread!!
    Thanks for bringing it back, Davey.

    Mostly newer music this week:

    CSS - Cansei de ser Sexy - (fun riot girrrl rock'n'roll with electronica - current fave - cannot stop moving when this CD is playing)
    Love Arcade (the kid is only 19 and he plays all the f'n instruments) - Love Arcade
    The Guild League (Aussies already know about them, but hey better late to the party, than never) - Inner North
    Hot Chip - The Warning
    The Little Ones - Sing Song
    Tokyo Police Club - A Lesson in Life (EP)
    Voxtrot - Mothers, Sisters, Daughters & Wives
    The Damnwells - Air Stereo
    Comets on Fire - Avatar
    and the Silversun Pickups - Carnavas
    (not to mention the latest arrivals from Tom Petty and Six Organs of Admittance)

    All in all a very good week in music,

    Bill
  • 08-29-2006, 03:21 PM
    BradH
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Davey
    And that always loveable Twilight compilation by one of the old Rave Wrecking Crew made a triumphant return to my CD player this week. Wow. What a lineup. What a collection. What a visionary!

    Yeah, some of us liked it enough to KEEP OUR ORIGINAL COPIES! HELLO!!!

    My list for the week:

    Frank Zappa - Waka/Jawaka - Rumour has it that Sleep Dirt was labeled as Hot Rats III when it was handed in to Warners. (So much for the epic opus Lather myth.) My guess is Waka Jawaka is Hot Rats II. I love all three of these.

    Zep III - remastered - I never noticed "Bron-Y-Aur" had castinets!

    Madeleine Peyroux - Dreamland - Amazing voice but I like the instrumentation better on her next cd. The harpsicord thing just ain't working for me.

    The Soft Boys - WFMU studios, Oct. 25, 2002 - Seems to work better than Nextdoorland for some reason. Hitchcock continues to process his influences effortlessly although the fire and fury heard on of Can Of Bees is missing here. What is prog? What is psych? What is indie? With bands like this it doesn't matter. The dual guitar work confirms my belief they were a Brit flipside of Television. Uncle Davey would love this.

    Albert Collins - Truckin' With Albert Collins - This is really the Cool Sound Of Albert Collins from 1965 under a different title. Pretty far ahead of its time if you compare it to just about every other blues practitioner of the era.

    Yes - Lewiston, NY - Aug 22, 2001. Supposedly the only soundboard that surfaced from the orchestral tour. It must've been heavily eq'd because the low end sounds like an audience recording. The orchestra is heavily present but that only works for me on the Magnification material. Frankly, a track skipper.

    Traffic - John Barleycorn Must Die - remastered with a couple of bonus tracks. Fans complain about the inclusion of the bonus track in the middle of the sequencing but it sounded cool to me. A classic, breakthrough album.

    Syd Barret - The Madcap Laughs - When Andy Partridge threw songs at the wall and recorded the fragmented structure on The Big Express it was an artistic experiment. When Captain Beefheart forced his band into disjointed song structures it was a pure example of sonic sculpting. But with Syd in 1970, the song structures are fractured because he was fractured. Snippets of beautiful melodies make it through his kaleidoscopic cheese grater brain but that only makes it worse. Sad, voyeuristic and, ultimately, depressing.

    Albert Collins - Iceman - From 1991. Great stuff but the bass player gets on my nerves a little.

    New music? That was the week before.
  • 08-29-2006, 03:55 PM
    Swish
    Life in the Foodchain is the greatest rock and roll album...
    ...ever recorded! At least that's what that critic (Steve Simels I think) from Stereo Review had to say. I happen to like it a bunch, but I wouldn't give it that high a rating. Here's what I listened to this past week:

    Tim O'Shea - S/T
    - nice first solo effort from the former Jayhawks drummer. Lots of help on this one and the second half sounds like the Beatles ala Revolver. I dig this one.

    The Long Winters - Putting the Day to Bed
    - their 3rd and probably their best. Not amazing, but a solid record IMO

    Webb Wilder - It Came From Nashville
    - I misplaced this one for a couple months and am glad I finally found it. Great rockabilly and easily Webb's best. I have the "Deluxe Full-Grown Edition" with 6 unreleased bonus tracks

    Traffic - saw BradH's reply mentioning this band, and I watched the only existing DVD performance of this wonderful band from about 1992 with Steve Winwood in perfect voice. Hightlight was Freedom Rider, but everything sounded great. I gotta get me a copy of this one.

    Bebel Gilberto - Tantotempo - she is the daughter of the guy who wrote The Girl From Impanema, Antonio Carlos Jobim. Nice latin tinged mellow tunes. Heard it in a music store in Toronto and had to buy it.

    Willie Nile - Streets of New York
    - have to jump on the bandwagon. Great stuff with his Dylan-esque vocals.

    Alejandro Escovedo - The Boxing Mirror - one of my faves of 2006 although not much talk about it here. Whatever.

    Swish
  • 08-29-2006, 05:10 PM
    Pat D
    I've missed the regular Tuesday listening threads. Among other things, I've done some comparisons of different recordings of the same works and I list the conductors.

    Berwald, Tone Poems on <st1 ="">Naxos</st1>.
    <o =""></o>
    Dvorak, Cypresses (early music for string qt.) On <st1 ="">Naxos</st1>.<o =""></o>

    Haydn, Symphony Nos. 96 and 102. Conductors Fischer and Dorati. Was doing a comparison to see which complete set I would prefer to get. So far, Dorati is ahead.
    <o =""></o>
    Mozart, Symphony No. 35 (Haffner). Krips, Royal Philharmonic, on Chesky.
    <o =""></o>
    Romanze (Mostly Italian songs). Richard Verreau, tenor. Eminent Canadian tenor of an earlier generation.
    <o =""></o>
    Bruckner, Symphonies Nos. 4, 6, 7, 8, 9. Was trying different recordings to see which ones to purge.
    <o =""></o>
    Wagner, Overtures. Marriner, on an old Telarc CD.
    <o =""></o>
    Diana Krall, When I Look Into Your Eyes
    <o =""></o>
    Stokowski Bach Transcriptions (there are a few besides Bach). Jose Serebrier Bournemouth SO, on <st1 ="">Naxos</st1>. This is a new CD and is quite nice.
    <o =""></o>
    J. S. Bach, Orchestral Transcriptions by Stokowski. Robert Pikler, <st1:city><st1 ="">Sydney</st1></st1:city> SO, on Chandos. Quite a few people besides Stokowski made orchestral transcriptions of Bachís music, including Respighi, Ormandy, and Elgar.
    <o =""></o>
    Sibelius, 4 Legends from the Kalevala (or 4 Lemminkainen Suites). Lukas Foss, Okku Kamu, Petri Sakari, Alexander Gibson. I wanted to compare the recordings I have. The Sakari on <st1 ="">Naxos</st1> is pretty good but I prefer Kamu and Gibson.
    <o =""></o>
    Sibelius, <st1 ="">Karelia</st1> Suite. Kamu, Sakari, Barbirolli, Ashkenazy.
  • 08-29-2006, 05:39 PM
    MindGoneHaywire
    I don't think I've said anything here about the NY Dolls album. I didn't expect much, but it's damn good. Good tunes, catchy, hooky, way more memorable riffs than I would've expected, and the lyrics way better than I could've imagined. Saw them at the South St. Seaport a couple of weeks ago, and they were much better than they were when I saw them 2 years ago, to boot. This is a keeper, maybe not as significant a rock record as the early Dolls records, but just as good, so far as I'm concerned.

    Bryan Ferry--As Time Goes By. Anyone else groan when they hear the painfully mediocre Rod Stewart classics albums? If, like me, you were wondering if such a project could actually work, and would look forward to hearing an experiment that worked, this is the one. Great from start to finish.

    Rockin' Bones--4 disc rockabilly box from Rhino that came out earlier this summer. Draws on a bit of the Las Vegas Grind sort of thing, nicely assembled, great package, not perfect, and sorta redundant since Rhino had already put out a multi-disc box of 50s outlaw rock, but still something I'd rather have in my stereo than a lot of other stuff.

    Miles Smiles--more to my liking than I would've thought. Better than Nefertiti, for sure. I also gave Sorcerer a spin, and that's not as bad as I expected, either, though not really my cup of tea. However...I've been listening to Blue Haze, one of the few Miles recs I didn't have but always wanted, and it's better than I thought it would be. Definitely fills in a missing piece for me. I've read so many mixed views of what Miles did between Birth Of The Cool & Workin'/Steaming/et al that I thought it would be uneven, but...it ain't. Yowza.

    Ahmad Jamal--the Okeh Sessions, or the Legendary Okeh Sessions, whatever it's called. Fantastic.

    Radiohead--OK Computer. Which I'm getting into more & more. Never disliked it, but it's not exactly my thing. However, I saw that the Easy Star All Stars (Dub Side Of The Moon) have released a reggae version, so I'd like to hear these songs a few more dozen times before I sink my teeth into that one.

    And a few others that I'm still hittin' & have been for months...the Arctic Monkeys, the last White Stripes album, the Coltrane double live rec from late 1965...
  • 08-29-2006, 06:33 PM
    Davey
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Swish Diddy
    Life in the Foodchain is the greatest rock and roll album...
    ...ever recorded! At least that's what that critic (Steve Simels I think) from Stereo Review had to say. I happen to like it a bunch, but I wouldn't give it that high a rating.

    :6:

    <CENTER> <FONT COLOR="#0080c0"><FONT size="+1"><BIG><BIG><BIG><B>Tonio K:
    Mindfood</B></BIG></BIG></BIG></FONT></FONT>
    <P>
    &nbsp;Steve Simels -- Stereo Review, April 1979
    </CENTER>
    <P>
    <BIG>LADIES AND GENTLEMEN..I give you ... the greatest album ever recorded!</BIG>
    <P>
    I can hear you already -- nitpickers. musicologists, the small-minded, owners of Book of Lists toilet paper. What, you cry, of Dennis Brain playing Mozart horn concertos? What of Miles Davis' "Sketches of Spain," B. B. King's "Live at the Regal," Bruno Walter's Mahler Fourth," "Sgt. Pepper." and John Coltrane's "A Love Supreme"? Not to mention Nervous Norvus' <I>Transfusion</I>, John Wayne's "America: Why I Love Her," and the Singing Dogs' <I>Jingle Bells</I>.

    Oh, all right. So I lied. But, honesty. it's the kind of lie that "Life in the Foodchain" inspires even in as responsible a critic as me. Its creator, Tonio K., is easily <I>twice</I> as angry as Elvis Costello and about six times funnier, and though he spent this decade's middle years in a Southern California booby hatch, rest assured that his songs sound nothing like James Taylor's. What they sound like, actually, is Loudon Wainwright if he'd O.D.'d on the absurdity of American life and then been drafted as the lead singer for Led Zeppelin. Beyond that, it's hard to describe the songs because to do so, or to quote the lyrics (tempting. tempting!), would be like giving away the one-liners in a Woody Allen film.
    <P>
    Let me simply say, then, that Tonio K. thinks that humor is a <I>serious</I> business and that the next big dance craze will be <I>The Funky Western Civilization</I>. Let me also say that he is the only rocker in memory whose album contains a cameo vocal appearance by Joan of Arc, that his music is bone-crushing rock-and-roll as manic as any punk band's but infinitely more sophisticated, that his lyrics are so absurdly literate and
    corrosively cynical that they have reduced me to rolling on the ftoor from the mere reading of them. &nbsp;To hear them declaimed by Tonio in his marvelously twisted voice while the band conducts an aural demolition derby behind him is the most exciting experience I expect to have in my living room for the remainder of this year.
    <P>
    The bottom line? Tonio K., if not the future, is certainly at least the George Metesky of rock-and-roll. As a matter of fact, I think I'll have to take back my earlier disclaimer: this is the greatest album ever recorded.
    <P>
    <TABLE BORDER="5" CELLPADDING="2">
    <TR>
    <TD bgcolor="#eeffff"><P ALIGN=Center>
    <BIG>Stero Review - Letters</BIG>
    <P>
    <FONT COLOR="#ff0000"><BIG>July 1979</BIG></FONT>

    <P>
    I believe there's a touch of One Flew over the Cuckoo's Nest in the political and relgious overtones of the "serious" humor of Tonio K.'s lyrics in "Life in the Foodchain" (reviewed by Steve Simels in the April issue) The musicianship is definitely heads-up,straight-on rock-and-roll. At first I thought Tonio K. was just a clone of the early Frank Zappa, but after listening to the whole album I went back for seconds to see what I had missed on the first go. As a part-time DJ, I considered violating our format and giving Tonio K. a little airplay (one night I snuck my copy of Nervous Norvus' <I>Transfusion</I> as a filler), but I don't think our program director is progressive enough for <I>The Ballad of</I><I> the Night the Clocks All Quit (and the Government Failed)</I>. "Life in the Foodchain" is my pick as the best thing to come out of the trash pile in a long time.

    <I> Vic Woot, Centerville, Ga</I>

    <FONT COLOR="#ff0000">August 1979</FONT>

    Steve Simels' excellent review (Apnl) of Tonio K. 's "Life in the Foodchain" has not only relieved my most complex anxieties about the future of rock in the eighties but has given my mind nourishment that should last well into the twenty-first century. But please, who is George Metesky?

    <I>Danny C. Lail, Shelby. N.C.</I>

    <i>Steve Simels replies: George Metesky was, of course, the so-called "Mad Bomber" who terrorized the people of New York City for well over a decade with a series of strategically placed explosive devices. Comparing Tonio K. with Metesky was my idea of a joke, son.</I>

    Has Simels gone mad? "Life in the Foodchain." while certainly a good. great, maybe even swell album, can't possibly be the greatest album ever recorded. "James Brown Live at the Apollo" is. This can be substantiated with actual documentation. so don't argue with me. And what about the Seeds' first album? And is the cat still in the freezer?

    <I>Tonio K., Calabasas, Calif.</I>
    </TD>
    </TR>
    </TABLE>
  • 08-29-2006, 07:28 PM
    Swish
    It was a lucky guess.
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Davey
    :6:

    <CENTER> <FONT COLOR="#0080c0"><FONT size="+1"><BIG><BIG><BIG><B>Tonio K:
    Mindfood</B></BIG></BIG></BIG></FONT></FONT>
    <P>
    &nbsp;Steve Simels -- Stereo Review, April 1979
    </CENTER>
    <P>
    <BIG>LADIES AND GENTLEMEN..I give you ... the greatest album ever recorded!</BIG>
    <P>
    I can hear you already -- nitpickers. musicologists, the small-minded, owners of Book of Lists toilet paper. What, you cry, of Dennis Brain playing Mozart horn concertos? What of Miles Davis' "Sketches of Spain," B. B. King's "Live at the Regal," Bruno Walter's Mahler Fourth," "Sgt. Pepper." and John Coltrane's "A Love Supreme"? Not to mention Nervous Norvus' <I>Transfusion</I>, John Wayne's "America: Why I Love Her," and the Singing Dogs' <I>Jingle Bells</I>.

    Oh, all right. So I lied. But, honesty. it's the kind of lie that "Life in the Foodchain" inspires even in as responsible a critic as me. Its creator, Tonio K., is easily <I>twice</I> as angry as Elvis Costello and about six times funnier, and though he spent this decade's middle years in a Southern California booby hatch, rest assured that his songs sound nothing like James Taylor's. What they sound like, actually, is Loudon Wainwright if he'd O.D.'d on the absurdity of American life and then been drafted as the lead singer for Led Zeppelin. Beyond that, it's hard to describe the songs because to do so, or to quote the lyrics (tempting. tempting!), would be like giving away the one-liners in a Woody Allen film.
    <P>
    Let me simply say, then, that Tonio K. thinks that humor is a <I>serious</I> business and that the next big dance craze will be <I>The Funky Western Civilization</I>. Let me also say that he is the only rocker in memory whose album contains a cameo vocal appearance by Joan of Arc, that his music is bone-crushing rock-and-roll as manic as any punk band's but infinitely more sophisticated, that his lyrics are so absurdly literate and
    corrosively cynical that they have reduced me to rolling on the ftoor from the mere reading of them. &nbsp;To hear them declaimed by Tonio in his marvelously twisted voice while the band conducts an aural demolition derby behind him is the most exciting experience I expect to have in my living room for the remainder of this year.
    <P>
    The bottom line? Tonio K., if not the future, is certainly at least the George Metesky of rock-and-roll. As a matter of fact, I think I'll have to take back my earlier disclaimer: this is the greatest album ever recorded.
    <P>
    <TABLE BORDER="5" CELLPADDING="2">
    <TR>
    <TD bgcolor="#eeffff"><P ALIGN=Center>
    <BIG>Stero Review - Letters</BIG>
    <P>
    <FONT COLOR="#ff0000"><BIG>July 1979</BIG></FONT>

    <P>
    I believe there's a touch of One Flew over the Cuckoo's Nest in the political and relgious overtones of the "serious" humor of Tonio K.'s lyrics in "Life in the Foodchain" (reviewed by Steve Simels in the April issue) The musicianship is definitely heads-up,straight-on rock-and-roll. At first I thought Tonio K. was just a clone of the early Frank Zappa, but after listening to the whole album I went back for seconds to see what I had missed on the first go. As a part-time DJ, I considered violating our format and giving Tonio K. a little airplay (one night I snuck my copy of Nervous Norvus' <I>Transfusion</I> as a filler), but I don't think our program director is progressive enough for <I>The Ballad of</I><I> the Night the Clocks All Quit (and the Government Failed)</I>. "Life in the Foodchain" is my pick as the best thing to come out of the trash pile in a long time.

    <I> Vic Woot, Centerville, Ga</I>

    <FONT COLOR="#ff0000">August 1979</FONT>

    Steve Simels' excellent review (Apnl) of Tonio K. 's "Life in the Foodchain" has not only relieved my most complex anxieties about the future of rock in the eighties but has given my mind nourishment that should last well into the twenty-first century. But please, who is George Metesky?

    <I>Danny C. Lail, Shelby. N.C.</I>

    <i>Steve Simels replies: George Metesky was, of course, the so-called "Mad Bomber" who terrorized the people of New York City for well over a decade with a series of strategically placed explosive devices. Comparing Tonio K. with Metesky was my idea of a joke, son.</I>

    Has Simels gone mad? "Life in the Foodchain." while certainly a good. great, maybe even swell album, can't possibly be the greatest album ever recorded. "James Brown Live at the Apollo" is. This can be substantiated with actual documentation. so don't argue with me. And what about the Seeds' first album? And is the cat still in the freezer?

    <I>Tonio K., Calabasas, Calif.</I>
    </TD>
    </TR>
    </TABLE>


    Swish
  • 08-30-2006, 08:27 AM
    Jim Clark
    It lives!!! I just don't really keep track on that "what's spinning" thread as much as I'd like. Something about a 23 page thread just doesn't appeal to me.

    I dusted off a couple of Legendary RR comps to take to the gym. I was looking for Nobody's most excellent punk rock comp and couldn't find it it in time. Instead I grabbed Building on Fire by the late, kinda great Darius. Also took out the equally late Jdaniels Judybats comp. Still gonna hunt down that punk rock comp and if I still can't find it, I'll grab one of J's many punk rock comps that are just as good but being elusive adds to the mystique.

    HEY!, Audiobill!! What do you think of the Voxtrot EP? I've had that on order like forever from the pink haired, pierced and tatooed girl from the record store. I can't wait to get it.

    AND HEY! Swish! I've spent a lot of time with that Long Winters CD too. Got it on a rec from the husband of the pink haired, pierced and tatooed girl at the record store. While it's not the kind of thing that might really grab a hold of me, I've found myself playing it quite a bit. It's a good little album.

    Also been playing a SBD boot from Muse of a 2006 show. I kinda like these guys and would think it would appeal to the non-indie, non-classical crowd around here.

    Found time for lots and lots of other goodies including some new Siouixsie and the Banshees bootlegs and also some discs that haven't seen the light of day for a while:

    Cibo Mato-Stereo Type A (whatever happened to Miho anyway?)
    Radio 4 - Gotham
    Clash-Cut The Crap
    Burning Ambitions, A History Of Punk vol.1
    The Cure- Faith
    and some others that I can't really recall right now

    Oh, and I got myself a little starter turntable. It's a Dual CS 508 that I got for 20 bucks. I added an Audiotechnica 71 ELC cartridge that I got for 19 bucks. It's in the shop getting lubed and having the cart. put on correctly. I still haven't bought a preamp for it but until I settle on one I'll use it with the denon 3802 or an older Yamaha receiver with a phono input. If I decide it's worth the hassle I'll look at picking up some newer vinyl and getting a more substantial rig.

    jc
  • 08-30-2006, 09:05 AM
    nobody
    If you need another copy of that comp, just let me know. My wife plays it a lot, so it’s always handy. And, that Burning Ambitions is really good. I've got an old 2 LP of that lying around, I assume its about the same as the volume one CD. Great stuff.

    And, always glad to hear about somebody grabbing a turntable.

    Been listening to a bunch of jazz lately, much of which I've already listed on the What's Spinning thread.

    Also pulled out M83s debut, which I hadn't listened to all the way through for a while, and I must say it really is something that sounds best listening all the way through.

    Same thing with Godspeed! You Black Emperor: Lift your skinny... Something that got a nice all the way through listen late this week when I should have been sleeping.

    Listened to a comp myself, the old maf 1979 comp which I absolutely love. Great year and great selections. Heaven is probably my favorite Talking Heads song.

    Still digging Johnny Cash's last album.

    ISAN's Plans Drawn in Pencil is still getting lots of play. If warm electric droning is your thing, it’s fantastic.

    Listened to the new Handsome Family this morning. Nothing to convert non-fans, but solid release for the believers.

    Went through a bunch of Joy Division. Got all their albums on an MP3 disc in the car that's been getting cycled through for the last few days.

    Listened to some can, a band I need to know more about and need to pick up more of, I've only got Cannibalism 2.

    OK...that's enough for now. Gotta run.
  • 08-30-2006, 09:16 AM
    Stone
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Jim Clark
    Clash-Cut The Crap

    I think you're the only person I've talked to about this album that likes it (outside of one or two songs). Nothing wrong with that, I'm just sayin' you're a unique individual, Mr. Clark.

    I haven't been listening to a whole lot lately, but I did spin that Voxtrot EP for the first time this morning. So far, I like it.

    Others I've listened to inlcude:

    Six Organs of Admittance - The Sun Awakens

    Silversun Pickups - Carsavan

    Strike Anywhere - [the new one]
    Meh.

    Lightning Bolt - Hypermagic Mountain
    YES!
  • 08-30-2006, 10:05 AM
    Dusty Chalk
    I can't seem to stop playing that Helene Grimaud "fox box". Just great piano music from beginning to end (one disk has orchestral accompaniment). I keep forgetting that I'm supposed to be bored by solo piano music -- there's enough soul and passion and fire and technical prowess on this disk for an entire career.

    Been listening to Last.FM past couple days -- "Artists Similar to Pete Namlook" radio (pleasant ambient electronica with some of the evil taken out, but enough left in not to be boring ol' newage)

    Also enjoyed some Backyardigans CDs. Yes, really. And no, I'm not babysitting anyone. I just like them a lot for some reason.

    Also: the Once More, With Feeling soundtrack. Joss was completely "on" for that one.

    Finally got around to picking up the Slowdive reissues/remasters/whatever of Souvlaki and Just for a Day, and I think I finally figured out what it is I don't like as much about Souvlaki. It's the dub elements. Now, I don't mind dub (I listen to Bill Laswell, ferpete'ssake), but I do mind it when it's (a) gratuitous, and/or (b) badly done somehow (e.g. by white people). I don't think they were totally "on" when they did the dub elements of their tracks. I thought they were really in their element when they did pure shoegazer stuff. Not that there's anything wrong with experimenting.

    Alright, I really still don't understand why I prefer one album over the other. At least, not in a way that I can explain.

    But I have a clue.

    LOTW is Franz Ferdinand, You Could Have It So Much Better or whatever it's called. I forgot how much I like this band, they really put a smile on my face with how energetic they are. Especially after recently listening to the likes of Robocop Kraus, Hard-Fi and Under the Influence of Giants, all of which I enjoy quite a bit. But Franz Ferdinand really are the top of the heap in this genre.
  • 08-30-2006, 01:38 PM
    audiobill
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Jim Clark
    It lives!!! I just don't really keep track on that "what's spinning" thread as much as I'd like. Something about a 23 page thread just doesn't appeal to me.

    I dusted off a couple of Legendary RR comps to take to the gym. I was looking for Nobody's most excellent punk rock comp and couldn't find it it in time. Instead I grabbed Building on Fire by the late, kinda great Darius. Also took out the equally late Jdaniels Judybats comp. Still gonna hunt down that punk rock comp and if I still can't find it, I'll grab one of J's many punk rock comps that are just as good but being elusive adds to the mystique.

    HEY!, Audiobill!! What do you think of the Voxtrot EP? I've had that on order like forever from the pink haired, pierced and tatooed girl from the record store. I can't wait to get it.

    AND HEY! Swish! I've spent a lot of time with that Long Winters CD too. Got it on a rec from the husband of the pink haired, pierced and tatooed girl at the record store. While it's not the kind of thing that might really grab a hold of me, I've found myself playing it quite a bit. It's a good little album.

    Also been playing a SBD boot from Muse of a 2006 show. I kinda like these guys and would think it would appeal to the non-indie, non-classical crowd around here.

    Found time for lots and lots of other goodies including some new Siouixsie and the Banshees bootlegs and also some discs that haven't seen the light of day for a while:

    Cibo Mato-Stereo Type A (whatever happened to Miho anyway?)
    Radio 4 - Gotham
    Clash-Cut The Crap
    Burning Ambitions, A History Of Punk vol.1
    The Cure- Faith
    and some others that I can't really recall right now

    Oh, and I got myself a little starter turntable. It's a Dual CS 508 that I got for 20 bucks. I added an Audiotechnica 71 ELC cartridge that I got for 19 bucks. It's in the shop getting lubed and having the cart. put on correctly. I still haven't bought a preamp for it but until I settle on one I'll use it with the denon 3802 or an older Yamaha receiver with a phono input. If I decide it's worth the hassle I'll look at picking up some newer vinyl and getting a more substantial rig.

    jc


    Hey, Jim.

    That Voxtrot is very good. I think you'll be pleased with the suggestion from the girl with the pink hair. Ramesh Srivastava's singing is very infectious and his voice is refreshing. I like this band tons & I think you'll find they're upbeat to your liking.

    There's another band that made me think of you when I first heard them; and their CD is all-JC-good: CSS - Cansei De Ser Sexy. I think you'll love this release in the same way you loved The Electric Six, when you first raved on about them & hooked the rest of us into their great dance sound.

    Lmk what you think,

    Bill

    NP., Surround Sound's The Sun Is On Our Side ;)
  • 08-30-2006, 03:33 PM
    Jim Clark
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by audiobill
    Hey, Jim.

    That Voxtrot is very good. I think you'll be pleased with the suggestion from the girl with the pink hair. Ramesh Srivastava's singing is very infectious and his voice is refreshing. I like this band tons & I think you'll find they're upbeat to your liking.

    There's another band that made me think of you when I first heard them; and their CD is all-JC-good: CSS - Cansei De Ser Sexy. I think you'll love this release in the same way you loved The Electric Six, when you first raved on about them & hooked the rest of us into their great dance sound.

    Lmk what you think,

    Bill

    NP., Surround Sound's The Sun Is On Our Side ;)

    In fairness, it was Nobody that first turned me onto Elec. Six, I just probably liked it more than most, except perhaps J and Nobody.

    I'm really looking forward to that Voxtrot and wish it would finally show up in stock or else I'm just gonna order it off the net. Thanks for the other tip, I'll check it out tonight.

    jc
  • 08-30-2006, 05:23 PM
    audiobill
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Jim Clark
    In fairness, it was Nobody that first turned me onto Elec. Six
    jc

    My apologies to Nobody... great taste, as usual, bud.
  • 08-31-2006, 02:57 AM
    tentoze
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Swish
    Willie Nile - Streets of New York - have to jump on the bandwagon. Great stuff with his Dylan-esque vocals.

    Good on y'- there's hope yet.

    Quote:

    Alejandro Escovedo - The Boxing Mirror - one of my faves of 2006 although not much talk about it here. Whatever.
    Co-signed- so far, this is my #2 for the year behind the aforementioned Mr. Nile.

    I've been stuck in a hotel in Pittsburgh for 3 weeks, and the only music I've had access to is a pretty decent NPR station in the rental car. Heard an interview with Josh Ritter the other day with him doing 2 cuts, live in the studio, from his latest release- it's been on my list, but it immediately moved to the top.

    Home tomorrow afternoon, and the big system will get a major workout this weekend trying to catch up on lost listening time.

    et
  • 08-31-2006, 04:05 AM
    Jim Clark
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by nobody
    If you need another copy of that comp, just let me know. My wife plays it a lot, so itís always handy. And, that Burning Ambitions is really good. I've got an old 2 LP of that lying around, I assume its about the same as the volume one CD. Great stuff.

    .

    Found the disc. It was in one of the binders but the tracklisting was printed so small I had just overlooked it. Of course with 34 tracks, the print had to be small! Took it with me to the gym yesterday. It was awesome.

    I have the Burning ambitions on LP too. My CDs are just a transfer from the LPs. I've always had a turntable, just not a "real" one.

    jc
  • 08-31-2006, 04:28 AM
    Swish
    You're in Pittsburgh? So 91.3 WYEP is the station...
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by tentoze
    Good on y'- there's hope yet.



    Co-signed- so far, this is my #2 for the year behind the aforementioned Mr. Nile.

    I've been stuck in a hotel in Pittsburgh for 3 weeks, and the only music I've had access to is a pretty decent NPR station in the rental car. Heard an interview with Josh Ritter the other day with him doing 2 cuts, live in the studio, from his latest release- it's been on my list, but it immediately moved to the top.

    Home tomorrow afternoon, and the big system will get a major workout this weekend trying to catch up on lost listening time.

    et

    ..and I used to listen to that during my travels there. Now that I have Sirius I don't bother with FM very often. Say, do you get to the Burgh very often? I'm there at least every few months or so. If you do, let me know in advance and we can hook up for a beer or something. I have 3 sales reps there so I have to make an appearance now and again.

    Swish
  • 08-31-2006, 08:12 AM
    nobody
    and I'm sure someone pointed 'em out to me...I'm just not up to remembering who or when or where...
  • 08-31-2006, 01:18 PM
    tentoze
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Swish
    ..and I used to listen to that during my travels there. Now that I have Sirius I don't bother with FM very often. Say, do you get to the Burgh very often? I'm there at least every few months or so. If you do, let me know in advance and we can hook up for a beer or something. I have 3 sales reps there so I have to make an appearance now and again.

    Swish

    Until today, I was supposed to be back week after next for another 3 wk stint, but events overtook that plan and I'm going to France the week of 9/18, then S. Korea on 9/29 for about 3 weeks. Bottom line, I have no farking idea when I'll get back to Pittsburgh, but it will happen sporadically from now on.
  • 08-31-2006, 01:46 PM
    Swish
    France? South Korea? Holy crap!
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by tentoze
    Until today, I was supposed to be back week after next for another 3 wk stint, but events overtook that plan and I'm going to France the week of 9/18, then S. Korea on 9/29 for about 3 weeks. Bottom line, I have no farking idea when I'll get back to Pittsburgh, but it will happen sporadically from now on.

    I thought I traveled a lot, but you take the grand prize. Anyway, if you know when you're headed there next, shoot me a PM or whatever if you remember. As I mentioned, I get there quite a bit and it's easy to make an excuse to head out there. It's not a very long trip for me.

    Ciao,

    Swish