The Tunesday Revival

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  • 09-12-2006, 07:28 AM
    ForeverAutumn
    The Tunesday Revival
    It worked okay for Davey last week, so let's try this again...

    Lots of new stuff this week for me.

    Wolfmother - S/T - I like this, it's like Led Zeppelin meets Black Sabbath with a little Brit Pop twist (I guess it should be Aussy Pop).

    The Dears - Gang of Losers - This is my first album by this band and I'm still getting to know it. It's okay so far...a little bland.

    Dirty Pretty Things - Waterloo to Anywhere - This is Carl Barat's (The Libertines) new band. I only have The Libertines second disk and I haven't spun it much, but so far I like this one better. Although, after hearing this one, The Libertines disk will get a second chance.

    Ray Lamontagne - Till the Sun Turns Black - This one didn't grab me on first spin the way Trouble did. But I think that it'll be a grower.

    The Beatles - Sgt. Pepper and Rubber Soul - I'm digging Rubber Soul. Sgt. Pepper has too much of a been-there-done-that feel. I've heard all those songs too many times over.

    Shane Nicholson - It's a Movie - Someone recommended this to me years ago when they heard that I loved Crowded House. I never bought it because it was only available as an expensive import. I picked it up on Saturday, used, for $6.99...sweet. Nice disk but even Neil Finn would be hard pressed to tell the difference between his own voice and Nicholson's.

    Overall a decent week of new music. Nothing really wowed me, but at least I have some new stuff to relieve the boredom that I was starting to feel.
  • 09-12-2006, 07:56 AM
    nobody
    Tuesday’s back, huh?

    I’ll play.

    Only new music I listened to recently was the new <b>Jerry Lee Lewis: Last Man Standing</b>. I’m not a fan of the duets style albums with a new big famous guest for every song, especially when I’d rather just hear Jerry Lee go at it, but the album is better than I expected. He’s still got the swagger and he can still pound the keys. His rockabilly take on Zeppelin’s Rock ‘n’ Roll is fantastic.

    Been listening since Sunday morning to stuff from my record haul, particularly impressive has been, <b>Lee Perry: Roast Fish, Collie Weed and Cornbread</b>, which may just be good enough to take over from his Super Ape release as my favorite Lee Perry record. If you like reggae, dub or Lee Perry, this is one not to be missed.

    Also got to listen to <b>Eek-A-Mouse: Wa-Do-Dem</b>, an album I hadn’t ever heard in its entirety and had only heard a few tracks from years back. Another reggae classic. Simply brilliant from start to finish, dancehall meets roots with a sense of fun and good humor.

    It had been far too long since I listened to the <b>B-52s</b> debut album as it was missing from my collection since my teenage years. I kept waiting, knowing I would come across a copy in good shape for cheap and finally grabbed this mint one for a buck. I had forgotten just how good this record is. I still had the red one, but while that one’s decent, it really pales in comparison to the debut. Surprisingly solid guitars throughout and just a fun, fun record.

    Played a couple jazz records, and was really taken by <b>Ella Fitzgerald: Ella in Berlin</b>. I’m not really much of a fan of live records for the most part, but the recording here is great and she was simply an amazing singer at that point in her career. I should say that she was still sound good though in a later release called <b>Ella and Oscar</b> that I also listened to with Oscar Paterson providing the piano. It’s nice to hear a couple legends in a small intimate setting.

    Also gave a little time on the turntable to <b>Chris Isaak: Silvertone</b>, his debut album. I had missed this one even though I have been a fan and it did not disappoint at all. A case of a record that if you’re a fan, you’ll love and put high on his list, but if you’re not a fan, I can’t really see it making one out of you. Great stuff though.

    Wife and I did a little walking down memory lane when in a rare moment I got her to just wanna sit with a record playing by Dragging out <b>Nitzer Ebb: Belief</b>. Stark minimal industrial beats at their purest. Hadn’t played this in a long time, since I stopped owning a cassette player and tossed out my tapes. If you like that minimal industrial sound, this one’s a sure fire winner.

    Found something that should be high on the list if you like relaxed jazz vocals from a wonderful male singer. <b>Johnny Hartman: Songs from the Heart</b> is an excellent take on some laid back vocal ballads.

    Also gave quick spins to <b>Wire: A Bell is a Cup</b>, which I was a bit underwhelmed by. I liked some of their other records and grabbed it, but it was a bit bland to me. Maybe it’ll grow on me. And <b>Nina Hagen: Nunsexmonkrock</b> which I was distracted from by household disasters, but which has I always enjoy.

    Sampled a few tracks off most of the rest, but still need more time to keep listening.

    Think I may need to pick up a couple new things next weekend to balance out…

    Oh...and I like that <b>Wolfmother</b> too. A bit too Zeppelin for me, but still a solid album. My wife listens to it about 6 times a day lately, so a little burnt out on it, but it is good and just the thing for people who miss that heavy, 70s style rock.
  • 09-12-2006, 12:32 PM
    Dusty Chalk
    I've been listening to a lot of classical piano these days -- especially two Prokofiev sonata sets -- Bronfman on Sony, and Pyotr Dmitriev on Arte Nova (which I really enjoy for a budget production).

    Also The Dark Psyche - a metal sampler from The End Records. Mucho cookie monster and witchy poo vocals -- not for the faint of heart.

    Talk Talk's The Colour of Spring SACD on my new $$$ headphones. Bass! in your Face! :drool:

    Camille's Le Fil made a comeback. I have fantasies about this woman, and it's mostly because of her voice. :banana:

    Aerosmith's O Yeah on SACD was a pleasant change of pace (working on a cover of Sweet Emotion).

    Chopin's Nocturnes on SACD from Hyperion -- but I slept through most of it. :sleep:

    Franz Ferdinand's first album is another recent reappearance that I enjoyed.

    LOTW was still Wolverine's Still.
  • 09-12-2006, 12:56 PM
    Stone
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by nobody
    Also gave quick spins to <b>Wire: A Bell is a Cup</b>, which I was a bit underwhelmed by. I liked some of their other records and grabbed it, but it was a bit bland to me. Maybe itíll grow on me.

    Not sure which "other records" you're referring to, but if you expected it to sound like their first three albums, I could see how you might be disappointed. Having said that, I think it's the best thing they did of that era of Wire, and enjoy it for what it is (which is basically pop record).
  • 09-12-2006, 01:17 PM
    Stone
    Fiery Furnaces - Bitter Tea

    Dead Milkmen - Eat Your Paisley!
    ... And I was always the one you said could never adjust; Well look at me now girl, eat my dust! ...

    Band Of Horses - Everything All the Time

    Regina Spektor - Begin To Hope
  • 09-12-2006, 01:34 PM
    nobody
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Stone
    Not sure which "other records" you're referring to, but if you expected it to sound like their first three albums, I could see how you might be disappointed. Having said that, I think it's the best thing they did of that era of Wire, and enjoy it for what it is (which is basically pop record).


    Heard their earlier stuff...then a couple 12" records sometime mid to late 80 that had a kind of minimal, atmospheric sound to them. I guess I was just hoping for something a bit more daring. Still could be something I may like after a few shots, just didn't jump out at me.

    Oh...and what's Regina Spektor like? I know nothing at all other than I like the cover shot on that Soviet Kitch disc.
  • 09-12-2006, 11:57 PM
    3-LockBox
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by nobody
    Only new music I listened to recently was the new <b>Jerry Lee Lewis: Last Man Standing</b>. Iím not a fan of the duets style albums with a new big famous guest for every song, especially when Iíd rather just hear Jerry Lee go at it, but the album is better than I expected. Heís still got the swagger and he can still pound the keys. His rockabilly take on Zeppelinís Rock Ďní Roll is fantastic.

    I heard someone talking about this the other day...I didn't know the dude was still alive! (seriously). I heard it was pretty good, but no, I'm not a huge fan of duet albums either.
  • 09-13-2006, 05:51 AM
    -Jar-
    Doing a little post-rocking.. picked up Mono's TAKE ONE MORE STEP AND YOU DIE last night and gave it one spin. Kind of similar to old Mogwai and more recently, Explosions in the Sky. Instrumental rock that is either gorgeous and quiet or building and crashing loudly. A fine listen.
  • 09-13-2006, 05:53 AM
    ForeverAutumn
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by 3-LockBox
    I heard someone talking about this the other day...I didn't know the dude was still alive! (seriously).

    Funny, I thought the exact same thing when I read nobody's post. My first thought was that this was done post-humously, like the Nat King Cole/Natalie Cole song.
  • 09-13-2006, 06:20 AM
    Stone
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by nobody
    Oh...and what's Regina Spektor like? I know nothing at all other than I like the cover shot on that Soviet Kitch disc.

    Well, I had seen the term "anti-folk" associated with her, so I expected somewhat of a Ani Difranco vibe, but it's not. It's really a pop record with some sythns, sythesized drums, and new wavy guitars at times. I like her voice, and I'd probably really be into her songs if they were stripped down arrangements. I'll give it more time, but I certainly don't see this one as anywhere near a top-ten-of-the-year contender.
  • 09-13-2006, 07:08 AM
    bobsticks
    Pretty slow week week around these parts, with only a handful of new entries to the library.

    Grabbed a few SACDs including Reggae in High-Fi which is a complilation including Yellowman, Mad Professor, and Don Carlos. The disc sounds very good, and very, very good compared to most reggae offerings
    I got curious and grabbed Dylan's Blood on the Tracks also on SACD. I found it to have obvious improvements over the original with the exception of the bass channel which is atrocious.
    Last but certainly not least on the hi-rez front was McCoy Tyner's New York Reunion. There is so much that is right about this disc that it would take to long to describe. If you have the means, I highly recommend it...

    On the redbook scene, I snapped up Mark Knopfler's Golden Heart which is suitable enough but not spectacular. Gotta love celtic rythyms on HDCD though.
    Next came Charango by Morcheeba which is a cool little foray into trip-hop. This one has already earned a few spins in just a couple of days.

    Continuing on with my newfound love affair with Over the Rhine I snagged up Drunkard's Prayer which, along with the Tyner disc, has got to be the LOTW.

    Great stuff and definetely a quality over quantity week thus far...

    Cheers
  • 09-13-2006, 07:30 AM
    bobsticks
    Holy Schnit!!!
    I almost forgot the most befuddling acquisition of the week. To preface, y'know how most of you view Elvis Costello? You know, he's a smug, hipster-wannabe, intolerable geek. Well that's how I feel about Jackson Browne, at least to the effect that he's an affected, poser, peace-nik, panty-wearin' dork.
    Well, Saturday morning I'm looking around for some mellow acoustic music and somehow I ran across Jackson Browne~Solo Acoustic Vol.1. I'm not sure what made me pick it up other than the desire to hear something organic yet ambient, and the back sleeve of the disc has him alone onstage, enshrouded by shadows and surrounded by guitars. This is a live album and sounds much better than it should. The vocals are miked exceedingly well and the guitar strings have that twangy, unbroken in quality of fresh,new strings. Lovely. If you can get beyond the bedwetting politcal blather this is really a good listen. Seriously.
  • 09-13-2006, 08:14 AM
    ForeverAutumn
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by bobsticks
    I almost forgot the most befuddling acquisition of the week. To preface, y'know how most of you view Elvis Costello? You know, he's a smug, hipster-wannabe, intolerable geek. Well that's how I feel about Jackson Browne, at least to the effect that he's an affected, poser, peace-nik, panty-wearin' dork.
    Well, Saturday morning I'm looking around for some mellow acoustic music and somehow I ran across Jackson Browne~Solo Acoustic Vol.1. I'm not sure what made me pick it up other than the desire to hear something organic yet ambient, and the back sleeve of the disc has him alone onstage, enshrouded by shadows and surrounded by guitars. This is a live album and sounds much better than it should. The vocals are miked exceedingly well and the guitar strings have that twangy, unbroken in quality of fresh,new strings. Lovely. If you can get beyond the bedwetting politcal blather this is really a good listen. Seriously.

    How much bedwetting political blather? I actually quite like Jackson Browne's music, but found him over-the-top-annoying the one time that I saw him live.
  • 09-13-2006, 09:24 AM
    bobsticks
    FA, it's deceiving. That's the only way to put it.

    The first song of the album is totally without his clumsy patois and, consequently, is the best part of the album. Pretty soon, here he comes engaging in a bit of glib and self-effacing banter with the audience. Innocuous enough. He just seems like some guy wearing an argyle sweater putting harmless and unmanly things on the shelf in some harmless and unmanly store...

    ...But that's how he reels you in, Autumn! Cuz the next thing you know here comes track 14 and, you guessed it, The War, and here comes the whine and cheese course. It's like a train you know is coming but just can't seem to get out of the way...

    ...Upon closer inspection, it appears that the characters at the record company may recognize JB's ability to annoy everybody who isn't Cat Stevens. I just noticed that they have assigned track numbers to all of his dialogue,LOL. So, tracks #2,4,6,11,13,15,17 & 19 are "intro". If you've got a player with programming capabilities this may be a must-have disc. :mad2: :10:
  • 09-13-2006, 09:37 AM
    ForeverAutumn
    LOL. You crack me up. :biggrin5:

    Thanks.
  • 09-13-2006, 12:28 PM
    audiobill
    Been listening to some new music that I picked up...

    Bob Seger - Face the Promise (enjoying this after only one spin, but my jury is still out... I'm a hopeless romantic...and Bob Seger has been sorely missed by me... good to see him back; more listens required & less romanticism))

    Sebadoh - Bake Sale
    Death Cab For Cutie - Transatlanticism
    and
    Van Morrison - Astral Weeks

    Hadn't spun "Astral Weeks" in years and it sounded so fresh and new again. Must be in my top ten of all time. What a brilliant series of songs and the arrangements are spot on. And, of course, there's Van Morrison's voice in its prime. Wow!!

    Cheers,
    Bill
  • 09-13-2006, 12:50 PM
    Dusty Chalk
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by -Jar-
    Doing a little post-rocking.. picked up Mono's TAKE ONE MORE STEP AND YOU DIE last night and gave it one spin. Kind of similar to old Mogwai and more recently, Explosions in the Sky. Instrumental rock that is either gorgeous and quiet or building and crashing loudly. A fine listen.

    I ended up liking everything I got by them. They just came out with a split/collab/something.
  • 09-13-2006, 01:00 PM
    Jim Clark
    I'm late. oops.
    Had some serious bouts with Pretty Girls Make Graves Elan Vital. Don't seem to recall anyone else commenting on it so I may be the only one who really enjoys this disc. One of my better buys in a sea of mediocrity, at least as far as my buying goes.

    Also couldn't help but pull out the highly emotional Nightbird by Erasure. This is going to be one of those enduring favorites for me. Virtually ignored by everyone means I'll probably end up liking it even more over the years.

    Slosh's post about the Ramones made me dig out my copy of Too Tough To Die, which turned out not to be so true but all in all still quality Ramones. Also felt inspired to listen to the latest BTS again. It does entertain me but lacks that certain quality that grabs me by the collar and says "this is awesome". I'll settle for good.

    Wrapped up with a hodgepodge of listening which included the Paul Simon/Eno collabaration, WOV, GBV, She Want's Revenge, Apoptygma Berzerk, Iris, and the (real) pride of Athens, GA. the B-52's.

    Some things came out yesterday that I have some moderate interest in:

    Yo Lo Sucko
    The Album Leaf (Sub Pop)
    Now It's Overhead (Saddle Creek)
    Slumber Party- which I'll probably grab regardless

    But if anyone has an opinion of any of the above, I'd love to hear about it.

    jc
  • 09-13-2006, 02:49 PM
    Dusty Chalk
    I'm definitely getting the Album Leaf album, but don't know when.
  • 09-13-2006, 03:30 PM
    BradH
    1 Attachment(s)
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Jim Clark
    Wrapped up with a hodgepodge of listening which included the Paul Simon/Eno collabaration, WOV, GBV, She Want's Revenge, Apoptygma Berzerk, Iris, and the (real) pride of Athens, GA. the B-52's.

    Hey, Jim, the other day I found some cool artwork for that B-52's show I sent last year. Let me know if you're into that sorta thang and I'll send it.
  • 09-13-2006, 03:46 PM
    Jim Clark
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by BradH
    Hey, Jim, the other day I found some cool artwork for that B-52's show I sent last year. Let me know if you're into that sorta thang and I'll send it.

    Brad:

    1. That is a cool looking cover!

    2. I don't jack around with art work, but thanks anyway!

    3. Didn't I send that show to you?? I'm getting old but I think that was pretty much the first show I grabbed on Dime.

    jc
  • 09-13-2006, 04:58 PM
    BradH
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Jim Clark
    Didn't I send that show to you?? I'm getting old but I think that was pretty much the first show I grabbed on Dime.

    Negative, Gramps. I remember clearly with razor sharp recall that only diet, exercise, clean living and old e-mails can provide.

    Boy, that sucker does sound good. A crown jewel. You can tell from Schneider's comments they were taping for a live album. Good thing it never happened or this would've been hosed up w/ processing and ambience. That's a French word.
  • 09-13-2006, 05:33 PM
    Jim Clark
    Oh and I forgot about that Cansei de Ser Sexi album that was recomended to me. I like it quite a bit. Seems kinda like what Karen O should be doing more of with the Yeah Yeah Yeahs.

    Went out to pick up my TT that's finally ready. Of course the store was closed by the time I got there. Undaunted I went out with my list in hand to the local music store. Naturally they didn't have too much of what I was looking for on hand but they did have the new Now It's Overhead album, much to my delight. Now I'll have something new to write about next week!

    Dusty Chalk, if you get that Album Leaf record before I do, tell me what you think. Please.

    jc
  • 09-14-2006, 07:18 AM
    Pat D
    Musical Clocks, works by Hadyn, Mozart, Weber, Verdi, Lehar, Strauss and others. Musical Clocks from Private Collections,& Famous Clock Museums in Vienna, Nuerenberg & Bernhaeusen. Candide LP CE 31093. One of the clocks is said to have been presented by Haydn, before his trip to London, to his patron, Prince Nicholaus Esterhazy. The notes regard this as "an instrument of great historical interest," though I think that's a little overblown for a musical clock! My wife was feeling down so I got this out to amuse her: "What's THAT?" she said, laughing. They seem to have some sort of little bellows and tunes are made by sort of little organ pipes, I'd guess from the sound.

    Elgar, Crown of India Suite. Barenboim, London Symphony.Columbia LP M 32936.

    David Chesky, Club de Sol. Chesky JD33.

    Patrick O'Hearn, Ancient Dreams. Private Music 1201

    Mark Isham, Vapor Drawings. Windham Hill WD-1027

    Alex de Grassi, guitar, Southern Exposure. Windham Hill WD-1030.

    Michael Hedges, guitar, Aerial Boundaries. Windham Hill WD-1032

    Brahms and Mozart, Clarinet Quintets. Gervase de Peyer, Melos Ensemble of London. Seraphim 7243 5 74520 2 1.

    Philip Feeney, Dracula, ballet music. John Pryce-Jones, Northern Ballet Theatre Orchestra. Naxos 8.553964.

    Marin Marais, Viol Music for the Sun King. Spectre de la Rose. Naxos 8.553081.

    Dvorak, String Quarte No. 9, Terzetto. Vlach Quartet. Naxos 8.553373.

    Stokowski, Bach Transcriptions. Jose Serebrier, Bournemouth Symphony. Naxos8.557883.

    Bruckner, Symphony No. 3. Georg Tintner, Royal Scottish National Orchestra. Naxos 8.553454.

    Toshiro Mayuzumi, Samsara tone poem. Yoshikazu Fukumura, Hong Kong Philharmonic Orchestra. Marco Polo 8.220297.

    Mayuzumi, Nirvana Symphony. Hiroyuki Iwaki, Tokyo Metropolitan Symphony Orchestra and Tokyo Philharmonic Chorus. The coupling is Buddhist Chant of Yakushiji Temple. Denon CO-78839.
  • 09-14-2006, 12:44 PM
    3-LockBox
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by nobody
    Oh...and I like that <b>Wolfmother</b> too. A bit too Zeppelin for me, but still a solid album. My wife listens to it about 6 times a day lately, so a little burnt out on it, but it is good and just the thing for people who miss that heavy, 70s style rock.

    I borrowed this from a dude...it has its moments, but try as I might, I just cannot bring myself to getting into that '60s psych-garageband-Mersey beat aestetic that soooo many 'psuedo-indie' bands have today. (The Vines come immediately to mind)

    That is not to say I don't enjoy a lot of the newer bands though. Been listening to the new My Morning Jacket and Wishbone Ash. Both of these bands are retro to an extent but have excellent song craft. Wishbone Ash is just a tad reminiscent of early Tom Petty to my ears.

    Last time I listened to Nitzer Ebb was That Total Age way back when. I remember sounded great on a big system. I think maybe I heard something from them a few years ago (Ebbhead?), but I remember it sounding kinda Yello-ish. Funny, I don't remember this band coming up when we talking about Kraftwerk a few weeks ago...and I'm too lazy to go back and look.

    I've also been listening to my FIM re-issues of Mozart's Three Divertmenti For Strings (1967) and Decca's Film Spectacular (from 1963). I usually don't get into Mozart much at all, but this one's interesting from the aspect that it was written for stereo (of sorts) in that the orchestra was spilt in two sections and there is some call and response aspects as well as ambient aspects written into the pieces. Sounds great on just two speakers. Very innovative coming from a such a young dude, two or three centuries ago. the Film Spectacular is for buffs only, with some interesting pieces from movie scores like On The Waterfront, Spellbound, and Lawrence Of Arabia.

    Edit: Wishbone Ash - heh heh (egg on my face)...seriously never heard of them before (I don't think anyway) I heard this CD playing over the store's speakers and bought it. I'd seen a couple of used CD's of theirs in this one store off and on for over a year or so that I had noticed. Sure do have a retro sound though :lol: The name of the CD is Strange Affair, FWIW. (hey, it did come out in 2003)