• 12-15-2007, 11:03 AM
    Rae
    psychic bump for a long-vanished thread
    Okay, I know we once discussed this on here, but that was probably years and several software changes ago, so...

    Just wanted to give a big shout-out to the Until the End of the World soundtrack. I know I've got company on this one-- this is one of my favorite soundtrack discs. The film is fitfully brilliant (although I've never seen the purported 8-hour director's cut, maybe that makes it make sense), but the album is solid all the way through. That opening sequence of Graeme Revell's unnerving score music (are those really pygmy voices?) into the beginning of Talking Heads' "Sax & Violins" is great but it really takes off when that track hits the chorus, with warm synths suddenly entering as David Byrne sings "weeeee... are criminals who never broke no laws"... then Julee Cruise sighing clouds on "Summer Kisses, Winter Tears", Neneh Cherry, a great track from some band Crime & the City Solution (who I know nothing of outside of this song), and material later from Lou Reed, Elvis Costello, Can, R.E.M., Nick Cave, Patti & Fred Smith, that overplayed Jane Siberry song, and even U2 sounding good in this context. Quite an assemblage.

    Can I get some love from anyone else who has this fine 80s artifact in their collection?

    ~Rae
  • 12-15-2007, 11:49 AM
    Davey
    Yea, one of my favorite movies and soundtracks. A friend of mine has the German 3-DVD PAL version and it is quite amazing, except I never got to finish watching the whole thing, and that friend isn't around here anymore! It's told in three parts, a trilogy, instead of the confusing Readers Digest version most of us saw it as originally. Some of the scenes are in French without subtitles. But mostly in English. Stll been meaning to pick up my own copy, cause it takes a few viewings to soak it all in. And apparently still no plans for a north american NTSC release.

    That great Jane Siberry/k.d.lang song from the film, Calling All Angels, made it onto our first Rave Recs group comp, although in the later version from Jane's album. Personally, I always liked the film version better, not quite as produced sounding.
  • 12-15-2007, 02:18 PM
    Jim Clark
    You know I got it, you know I like it. I honestly don't recall ever seeing the movie and if I did I obviously don't remember it. As a consequence I usually don't think of it as a soundtrack but more of alternative sampler much in the same way I think of the Sire Records and Columbia/Epic alternative samplers of the same time. It holds its own on that front to be sure.

    I might have to bust that one out next. Right now I've got Yaz' Upstairs at Eric's on the TT. Never seem to tire of that one. I wish THAT Alison Moyet would start making records again.

    jc
  • 12-16-2007, 05:40 PM
    3-LockBox
    I like the soundtracks to Escape From LA, X-Files (movie), and Lost Boys and listen to them qite a bit.

    What's the movie about?
  • 11-12-2010, 02:04 PM
    Rae
    No surprise that this turned up pretty early on in an article on the AV Club today about soundtracks that would work independent of the films they're from (link), but the article also included a tidbit that I wasn't previously aware of:

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Tasha Robinson
    In 1990, he went to various artists—Nick Cave, Jane Siberry, Talking Heads, R.E.M., Julie Cruise, U2, Daniel Lanois, Lou Reed, Elvis Costello, and a bunch more—and asked them to produce him a track that sounded like what they thought they’d be playing in 1999. The result is a jangly, strange album that’s now set in those artists’ past, but sounds like their projected futures. Even if it wasn’t full of terrific songs, I’d still be fascinated with it entirely as a pop artifact.

    Very cool idea, and only deepens my appreciation of what's always been one of my favorite soundtracks.

    ~Rae