• 01-22-2004, 08:47 AM
    -Jar-
    Execs vow global crackdown on music file sharing
    http://www.cnn.com/2004/TECH/interne...eut/index.html

    Well, what do you guys think?

    In a rare upbeat statement, the IFPI said its initiative is building a vibrant, albeit small, market for selling music downloads that appears to be stealing momentum from peer-to-peer networks such as Kazaa and WinMX where all varieties of music are available for free.

    "We believe that the music industry's Internet strategy is now turning the corner, and that in 2004 there will be, for the first time, a substantial migration of consumers from unauthorized free services to legitimate alternatives," said Jay Berman, IFPI's CEO.


    I think that's a little over-optimistic. There might be some migration, but I have my doubts that it will be "substantial" People who are going to use Kazaa and WinMX are going to keep using those. People who start buying music downloads are the people who will probably stop buying as many cd's. So, the market will shift from Brick n' Mortar to the internet, but I don't think the file-swapping is going to go away.

    For the few dozen songs I download per year, it's not going to be worth it for me to sign up for one of those pay services anyways.. The mega-file swappers will just get smarter and learn to cover their tracks better. The music industry is failing because of poor product and high prices. Trading of music has been taking place for years, long before Napster. And it's not going to just magically stop.

    -jar
  • 01-22-2004, 10:16 AM
    DarrenH
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by -Jar-
    Well, what do you guys think?

    I think that's a little over-optimistic. There might be some migration, but I have my doubts that it will be "substantial" People who are going to use Kazaa and WinMX are going to keep using those. People who start buying music downloads are the people who will probably stop buying as many cd's. So, the market will shift from Brick n' Mortar to the internet, but I don't think the file-swapping is going to go away.

    For the few dozen songs I download per year, it's not going to be worth it for me to sign up for one of those pay services anyways.. The mega-file swappers will just get smarter and learn to cover their tracks better. The music industry is failing because of poor product and high prices. Trading of music has been taking place for years, long before Napster. And it's not going to just magically stop.

    -jar

    I agree, some will migrate to legitimate subscription type services or pay per download sites but not nearly a many as the recording industry may think. As long as Kazaa and the others remain, there will be lots of people to use them. And like you said, lots of people covering their tracks better.

    I did watch the evening news the other day and it was reported that the recording industry has issued 500 more lawsuits against internet music traders. I'm sure it was for violating copywrite laws. Speaking of copywrite laws, the trading of music has indeed been going on for years. I used to record FM radio and vinyl records onto cassette and then make copies for my friends. Lots of people did this and lots of people are still doing this. Look at all the comps and stuff being traded around here. Only since the proliferation of the internet has the recording industry seen music trading as a threat. Lower the prices of the product. Quit marketing all of these stupid boy bands, girl bands, pop divas, American Idol crap and on and on and give us a better product to buy. Only then will you see a change. Oye.

    Internet shopping is certainly on the rise. It's a shame really but brick and mortar stores just don't want to carry large inventories. Let's just have one main warehouse for distribution, throw our inventory online, and let folks buy what they want using their computer. Likewise, the recording industry can have everyone download what they want and then charge them a buck per song for the priviledge. That way, they won't have to press the CD, create and then print the artwork and then distribute the final product. How grand. Bah.

    At any rate, I would prefer not to shop online but I'm finding it increasingly difficult to get want I want with respect to music. Aside from the local department chains (K-mart, Walmart, Meijer whos selection generally suck anyway) I have only a Barnes and Noble to shop for music and their selection, although not bad, isn't what I would call stellar. If I'm willing to drive 20 miles there's a Media Play, Best Buy, another B&N and a pretty good used CD shop that gives me more options. Bottom line is, I like shopping for music in the stores. I like that whole experience. I don't want to have to go online every time I want a piece of music. Where's the fun in that.

    Well, I hope I didn't bore anyone.

    Darren
  • 01-22-2004, 11:06 AM
    Dave_G
    Ya didn't bore me, big fella!
    I too love to shop in stores, but like you, I like for the most part non commercial music so we heve to shop speciality stores or go online.

    But driving 20 miles isn't any big deal to me, I usually do that with Trev on Saturdays anyhow.

    Hey, dooya think I would like the new Tull dvd.

    Dave
  • 01-22-2004, 11:15 AM
    Dave_G
    Stupid me, I didn't add any content about the original Q.
    Download Schmownload.

    I could care less what "they" think.

    I don't have a cd burner at home and I have dial up so downloading at my house is not even in the picture.

    (thank god because probably we would be a target of a lawsuit because of 10 year olds).

    The reason they download is, besides being free, it's fast, fun, and the kids get only the toons they want and who cares about the booklet and sound quality.

    Dave
  • 01-22-2004, 11:32 AM
    DarrenH
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Dave_G
    I too love to shop in stores, but like you, I like for the most part non commercial music so we heve to shop speciality stores or go online.

    But driving 20 miles isn't any big deal to me, I usually do that with Trev on Saturdays anyhow.

    Hey, dooya think I would like the new Tull dvd.

    Dave

    Nah, driving 20 miles is no biggie for me either. It's part of the experience. And you're right, the proggy stuff is nowhere to be found in the brick and mortar shops.

    You've never seen that Tull video? Yes, I think you would. The first 50 minutes or so relate to the 25th anniversary reunion (which was in 1993) of both past and present band members with interviews of said members and quite a few snippets of concert and promotional video from as early as 1970 up to 1993. Sorta like a documentary.

    The last 40 minutes or so are devoted to 7 concert and promotional videos in their entirety. Most of it from the 70's. I think it's pretty cool stuff as there really isn't a lot of Tull video out their, especially the early stuff.

    Darren