Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 58

Thread: CD vs. CR-R...

  1. #1
    Suspended PeruvianSkies's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    3,373

    CD vs. CR-R...

    Got a question that has been buggin' me for quite some time, but never brought the question up, so here goes...

    Rarely do I play CD-R's in my setup, mostly I use them in the car, but occassionally someone will burn me a copy of an album (like bobsticks sending out a comp) and i'll have to play the CR-R instead of the regular Redbook CD. However, I have compared back and forth and I never get the same sound from the CR-R's and I was wondering if there is something that can be done about it. Are there certain CD-R's that I should invest in for audio quality or is it a lost cause? Does it matter how I am burning the disc? I typically burn straight on my laptop (Mac) using iTunes and I have the iTunes setting for Apple Lossless.

  2. #2
    Close 'n Play® user Troy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Highway 6, between Tonopah and Ely
    Posts
    2,318
    There is no difference in the media you use WRT sound quality. The 5 cent off-brand Chinese CD-Rs sound exactly the same as the one dollar Sony or Maxell discs.

    The difference lies in stability. Sometimes the cheap discs don't play in some players. Sometimes they skip or "tick" on playback because the recording layer is too thin and the player can't read the disc in real time, so it hesitates.

    But if you are using the exact same source material on the recordings I defy ANYONE to tell the difference in a blind A/B test between cheap and expensive discs.

    Either you are accidentally burning your discs as low end mp3s or you are only imagining this perceived lowering of fidelity. To prevent the former, go to iTunes and the View> View Options and activate the "kind" checkbox and it will show you what kind of file you are working with. Also, use Preferences> Advanced> Burning to make sure you are burning in the right format.

  3. #3
    Suspended PeruvianSkies's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    3,373
    Quote Originally Posted by Troy
    There is no difference in the media you use WRT sound quality. The 5 cent off-brand Chinese CD-Rs sound exactly the same as the one dollar Sony or Maxell discs.

    The difference lies in stability. Sometimes the cheap discs don't play in some players. Sometimes they skip or "tick" on playback because the recording layer is too thin and the player can't read the disc in real time, so it hesitates.

    But if you are using the exact same source material on the recordings I defy ANYONE to tell the difference in a blind A/B test between cheap and expensive discs.

    Either you are accidentally burning your discs as low end mp3s or you are only imagining this perceived lowering of fidelity. To prevent the former, go to iTunes and the View> View Options and activate the "kind" checkbox and it will show you what kind of file you are working with. Also, use Preferences> Advanced> Burning to make sure you are burning in the right format.
    TROY,

    Should I checkmark to burn a CD or an MP3 CD??? Those are my options under burning.

  4. #4
    Musicaholic Forums Moderator ForeverAutumn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    9,769
    Quote Originally Posted by PeruvianSkies
    I typically burn straight on my laptop (Mac) using iTunes and I have the iTunes setting for Apple Lossless.
    Is the original file also Apple Lossless? I once asked a friend burn a disk for me that turned out unlistenable. It turned out that the original files were MP3s and then he converted them to WAV files for me so that I could play the disk on a CD player. It didn't turn out so well.

  5. #5
    Class of the clown GMichael's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Anywhere but here...
    Posts
    13,243
    Most of the time I use my CD-R player. I put a CD in and record it to the hard drive. Then put a new CD-R in and burn it from the hard drive. The recordings come out well, but the high end is never quite as good as the originals. When I play them back in the car, I either have to bump the treble up or the base down a notch to get the same sound as the originals would give me. Never gave it much thought as it's only a minor bother.
    WARNING! - The Surgeon General has determined that, time spent listening to music is not deducted from one's lifespan.

  6. #6
    Close 'n Play® user Troy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Highway 6, between Tonopah and Ely
    Posts
    2,318
    Quote Originally Posted by PeruvianSkies
    Should I checkmark to burn a CD or an MP3 CD??? Those are my options under burning.
    Burn it as a regular CD, not an mp3 CD. Bear in mind that you can record mp3 files onto a regular CD too, so don't think that just because it's a regular CD that you will have improved sound quality. It's all about your source files, if they are crappy sounding mp3s to begin with, there's nothing you can do to make them better.

    The beauty of mp3 discs is that you can put 8+ hours of music (ripped at hi-enough-fi for me 192K) on one disc. I have a pile of these for the car.

  7. #7
    Suspended PeruvianSkies's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    3,373

    next question...

    Is there a difference between these two options: 1. insert a regular CD into my apple laptop and open the disc up, then click and drag all of the tracks onto my desktop, then open them up in iTunes and burn a CD from there. 2. open iTunes and insert the same CD into my laptop and choose import CD, then burn disc from that.

    I typically do option 2 and I am wondering if that is why I am noticing a big difference in the quality. The reason this came up is because a few months ago I was trying to take all of the discs that I normally use for DEMO purposes and consolidate them all into 1 master disc that I could use for calibration and testing. The results though are poor as the master disc does not deliver the high quality of the regular CD's that I use. Here are some of the differences:

    1. the volume is significantly different as the CD-R is much lower in volume.
    2. lack of bass.
    3. lack of overall fidelity.
    4. I seem to get a bit of background 'noise'.
    5. there are clicks and pops on occasion.

  8. #8
    Close 'n Play® user Troy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Highway 6, between Tonopah and Ely
    Posts
    2,318
    Take a look at the disc you made in iTunes with the "kind" feature turned on so you can see what kind of files you are putting on the disc.

    Option 2 is the preferred way. Make sure that when you import the songs that you are importing WAV or AIFF files and not mp3 (or apple lossless). This is set in Preferences> Advanced> Importing. You may also try using the "Error Correction" setting there as well. It slows down the import process, but is more stable. This is true of burn speed. I use "Maximum possible" (Preferences> Advanced> Burning) rather than setting a specific speed.

    Background noise and clicks are from too fast ripping/burning combined with inferior quality discs as outlined in my first post.

  9. #9
    Forum Regular nobody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    1,964
    Use Exact Audio Copy, it can be downloaded for free. And, burn at a slower speed.

    I've actually heard from several people (just passing it on, can't personally confirm) that if you burn a disc carefully that the sound can actually improve as the timing of everything gets rechecked and error correction will fix any possible timing errors from the original.

    I won't vouch for them sounding better, but I've burned plenty of discs and have only had quality problems when burning too fast. In those cases, I'd get a tiny sounding disc with droputs.

  10. #10
    Suspended PeruvianSkies's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    3,373
    Quote Originally Posted by nobody
    Use Exact Audio Copy, it can be downloaded for free. And, burn at a slower speed.

    I've actually heard from several people (just passing it on, can't personally confirm) that if you burn a disc carefully that the sound can actually improve as the timing of everything gets rechecked and error correction will fix any possible timing errors from the original.

    I won't vouch for them sounding better, but I've burned plenty of discs and have only had quality problems when burning too fast. In those cases, I'd get a tiny sounding disc with droputs.
    Is there a link for the download and will it work on Mac OSX platform?

  11. #11
    Close 'n Play® user Troy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Highway 6, between Tonopah and Ely
    Posts
    2,318
    Quote Originally Posted by PeruvianSkies
    Is there a link for the download and will it work on Mac OSX platform?
    One of the fundamental differences with the Mac platform is it's seamlessness. Unlike Windows machines, there's no need to install 3rd party software and all it's attendant compatibility issues with the Win system.

    I know people with 5 CD burning software packages they've installed on their Microshaft OS computers and they can't get any of them to run correctly because each one conflicts with the other.

    iTunes is built into OSX. Would you use a different e-mail program on your Mac than "Mail"? Extremely doubtful bcause of how it's integrated with everything else in the computer. iTunes is no different. It's synced with Safari and your burning hardware at the most basic level.

    Sure, you can use stuff like EAC or Toast, but you don't have to. iTunes does everything EAC does and more. Learn how to use it, it's your friend.

  12. #12
    Forum Regular
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Lawrenceville
    Posts
    1,112
    I make my cdr's using my stereo system. Source cd player is my NAD C 525BEE.

    The cdr machine is the Pioneer PDR-509.

    No computers. No software. Works great. 1:1 copy speed.

    The only gotcha is that you have to use "music" cdr's.

    Only 1 time did I think the burned copy was sonically superior to the original, and that was a copy of the original EMI cd pressing of Jethro Tull's "Roots to Branches".

    Beyond that, the copied discs sound great. Plus they are HDCD encoded too.

    I am going to do another experiment using Ted Nugent's Double Live Gonzo 2 cd set. It has pretty lousy sound. I'll burn it and see how they compare.

    Other weak cd's like the old Three Dog Night releases on MCA sound pretty crappy, too, might experiment with those too.

    Peace, Love, Dove.

    Dave_G

  13. #13
    Forum Regular nobody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    1,964
    I haven't used a mac in around 10 years, so I'm not help there...didn't realize it was a mac centric question.

    But, PCs are not that damn hard. I have one burning program and it does everything I need.

  14. #14
    all around good guy Jim Clark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    In a dead sea of fluid mercury
    Posts
    1,900
    wandering musings since I actually have a few minutes tonight.

    Several years ago I was demo'ing speakers. The B&W (forget which models) where freaking awful sounding to me. The sales guy upon learning that he wasn't going to get a sale told me that they sounded so bright and awful was because I had brought in a CDR full of my demo toons (My very own" Best of Sounds Good vol. 1&2" for all the old timers). I said he was crazy, he said it was obvious. We agreed to put it to the test. I brought in a couple of the original discs and told him to pick them out and we agreed that if he guessed CDR or original more than half the time out of 10 guesses I'd defer to him. A couple of minutes in he knew he was screwed. Some people claim they can hear a difference but I've never even heard about anyone coming close to substantiating it.

    Saw him again about 3 months ago when I needed some longer screws for a TT cartridge. We still laugh about it.

    jc
    "Ahh, cartoons! America's only native art form. I don't count jazz 'cuz it sucks"- Bartholomew J. Simpson

  15. #15
    Suspended PeruvianSkies's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    3,373
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Clark
    wandering musings since I actually have a few minutes tonight.

    Several years ago I was demo'ing speakers. The B&W (forget which models) where freaking awful sounding to me. The sales guy upon learning that he wasn't going to get a sale told me that they sounded so bright and awful was because I had brought in a CDR full of my demo toons (My very own" Best of Sounds Good vol. 1&2" for all the old timers). I said he was crazy, he said it was obvious. We agreed to put it to the test. I brought in a couple of the original discs and told him to pick them out and we agreed that if he guessed CDR or original more than half the time out of 10 guesses I'd defer to him. A couple of minutes in he knew he was screwed. Some people claim they can hear a difference but I've never even heard about anyone coming close to substantiating it.

    Saw him again about 3 months ago when I needed some longer screws for a TT cartridge. We still laugh about it.

    jc
    Well, I am telling you that the difference on my system is insanely easy to detect. I mean, my wife notices a difference...now that's saying something.

  16. #16
    Forum Regular
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    A sometimes wet and damp York, England
    Posts
    528
    Quote Originally Posted by PeruvianSkies
    Well, I am telling you that the difference on my system is insanely easy to detect. I mean, my wife notices a difference...now that's saying something.
    I've been bitten by this feeling i.e there is a difference between the original and a CDR a few times but each time I actually sit down and try and establish the difference I can't, at least not on my system. I must have at least a dozen or more different types of CDR's and I have no preference for one CDR over the other.

    But here's the problem a friend once copied me a CD by The Blue Nile - Hats. I didn't need it cos I had the original CD but I ended up listening to it one day and thought wow this sounds brighter and definitely louder than the original. So I compared them and although the brightness/sharpness was difficult to verify it was definitley quite a few notches up on the volume. I don't know what software he used to copy with, or if he 'tweaked' the sound but there was a difference.

    Since then I sometimes will even enhance an original. Now that may be blasphemy to some audiophiles but it works for me. Who hasn't thought sometimes a track lacks bass, or is overly bright but by lifting or dropping the bass/treble or lifting the output level to match other tracks you can improve the sound.

    My only main tip is try to avoid fast burning speeds (40x) although that's nothing to do with the sound, it simply produces less errors e.g glitches and pops. A friend tried to convince me burn no faster than 2x for better sound quality. But come on, I mean are you telling me production CD's are burned at a slow rate for sound quality - I don't think so, not when economics are the main concern.

    Cheers
    Mike

  17. #17
    all around good guy Jim Clark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    In a dead sea of fluid mercury
    Posts
    1,900
    Quote Originally Posted by PeruvianSkies
    Well, I am telling you that the difference on my system is insanely easy to detect. I mean, my wife notices a difference...now that's saying something.

    Well, I didn't read every word of every post on this thread but I seem to recall there was some discussion about whether or not you were even copying discs correctly. So yeah, if you've got clicks and pops in your copies you obviously have issues. What I'm talking about is when it's done correctly. I've never had a mac so sadly I can't offer any help, and I wasn't trying to. Simply pointing out that when you have the right software and properly functioning hardware you should be a very happy camper.

    There are enough resources around that I'm sure you'll be able to get it worked out. Troy is a Mac god, do whatever he says : )

    jc
    "Ahh, cartoons! America's only native art form. I don't count jazz 'cuz it sucks"- Bartholomew J. Simpson

  18. #18
    Forum Regular BradH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Research Station No. 256
    Posts
    643
    Quote Originally Posted by PeruvianSkies
    The results though are poor as the master disc does not deliver the high quality of the regular CD's that I use. Here are some of the differences:

    1. the volume is significantly different as the CD-R is much lower in volume.
    2. lack of bass.
    3. lack of overall fidelity.
    4. I seem to get a bit of background 'noise'.
    5. there are clicks and pops on occasion.
    It almost sounds like it's converting it to mp3 and back to WAV but I'm not that familiar /w iTunes.

    Troy's right about the different brands of CDR's, it's all about the stability. However, if the brand sucks enough, you can get an awful lot of error correction taking place on playback. Luckily, finding the best brand is easy. If it says "made in Japan" you're good to go. There's only one factory in Japan and it's Taiyo Yuden, the best on the market. The TY brand is more expensive but they also make discs for Fuji even though they're really TY's. Sounds crazy but it's true. I've burned over a thousand Japanese Fuji's and Feurio identfied every one of them as Taiyo Yuden.

  19. #19
    Suspended PeruvianSkies's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    3,373
    Thanks everyone for the help. I am realizing that there are a number of things that could be wrong and I am also realizing that there are two different situations that could happen. The first, is taking a regular CD and copying the files to my hard drive and then ripping a CD from there, then there is downloading music from iTunes and burning the CD from that, which I haven't had any issues with the sound quality on those discs. However, at work I have a DVD/CD tower burner that does 7:1 and I have not had any problems there either. This only seems to be a problem when I am taking the files and copying them to my hard drive and then burning a master disc of some compilations.

    Although, what I should do is compare a downloaded version of an album burned to CD-R against the store-bought Redbook CD. I have never compared these before. I have compared CD and CD-R's of exact copies and there is minimal difference.

    Does anyone know what I would experience a huge gap in the volume though between these???

  20. #20
    Suspended 3-LockBox's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Hey! Over here!
    Posts
    2,746
    I have purchased CD-Rs that wound up having a ton of errors on them, but for the most part, CD-Rs are all the same.

    I had a salesman say the same thing, regarding CD-R data discs and actual music CD-Rs. I told him "data is data". He said "but the pits on the music discs were specially formulated for music". I told him the pits on his face were specially formulated for celibacy.

  21. #21
    Suspended PeruvianSkies's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    3,373

    so is this a bunch of bull....

    From MOFI's website....

    ULTRADISC DVD-R – The Ultimate Archival Media
    The 24 Karat Gold ULTRADISC™ DVD-R is designed for professional, data critical, music and graphic archival applications, and all other data storage where there is no room for loss or error. These specially gold plated ULTRADISC™ DVD-R’s ensure excellent reflectivity, no corrosion, and dramatically improved resistance to light and heat. Additional features include instantaneous pit burning (burst burning) for superior pit formation and extremely low to no error rate; and an added, patented, scratch resistant, protective surface. Due to these features, little if any error correction is required upon retrieval of information, producing precise reproduction of stored data. The average DVD-R has a projected lifespan of 20 years—if stored in ideal conditions. Accelerated aging tests show that the ULTRADISC™ DVD-R retains its specifications for more than 100 years. Now information can be accurately stored and retrieved virtually forever.

    24 Karat Gold Layer
    Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab created the world’s first 24 Karat Gold music CD in 1987, the ULTRADISC™. Now MFSL has put that expertise into the development of the ULTRADISC™ DVD-R. The combination of the superior reflectivity and longevity of 99.99% pure 24 Karat Gold, plus a specialized, patented bonding agent, ensures that the ULTRADISC™ DVD-R will never oxidize and fail to output information, as many commercially available DVD-R’s do. The ULTRADISC™ DVD-R is extremely stable in the real world environment.

    Data Guard
    The ULTRADISC™ DVD-R utilizes a state-of-the-art scratch and chemical resistant coating that provides unprecedented protection. This extremely resilient material is impervious to chemicals and 7 times more scratch resistant than an uncoated disc. DATAGUARD treated discs greatly reduce the possibility of uncorrectable errors. If a disc is accidentally mis-handled DATAGUARD will lower error correction during playback, therefore improving read accuracy.

    Proprietary Photosensitive Dye
    Unlike commonly used DVD-R’s containing Cyanine or Azo, which can lose their characteristics quickly from exposure to light and heat, the ULTRADISC™ DVD-R utilizes a patented photosensitive dye which ensures accurate burning and stability, plus exceptional longevity and durability. Whereas the two other types of dye are formed with linear molecular structures, which break down easily when exposed to the elements, the unique photosensitive dye utilized in the ULTRADISC™ DVD-R has an annular structure which forms a strong and stable chemical bond.

    Extremely Accurate and Precise Burning
    When recording speeds are increased three major problems occur. Parity of inner-code (PI) errors rise as a result of an increase of laser burning power which leads to pitch (pit?) deformation. As burning speeds rise so does signal jitter due to thermal interference. Furthermore, higher speeds cause vibration in the drive when burning the disc, increasing mechanical jitter. MFSL engineers urge professionals to burn their data in
    real time, better known as 1X for the most accurate results.

    Accurate and Precise Information Retrieval
    The ULTRADISC™ DVD-R’s specialized dye reacts more quickly to the writing laser than do other dyes. It reacts in a "burst" mode instead of the sluggish "melt" mode. Due to this instantaneous reaction, precise pit edges are formed. This is crucial for the laser pickup to
    accurately interpret the information, and thereby reducing or eliminating the use of interpolation/error correction circuitry. Additionally, a specially formulated, black ink is used to coat one side of the disc in order to reduce stray reflections which could alter readings.

    Ultra Quality Control - 4 Levels of QC
    Utilizing the highest quality control standards in the industry, all the manufacturing and packaging of the ULTRADISC™ DVD-R is done in
    state-of-the-art cleanroom conditions. Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab has rejected random sampling techniques, which are simply not stringent enough for critical data storage applications. Instead, MFSL utilizes an unprecedented 4-level quality control process.
    First, a sample out of every 3,000 discs is tested, critically examined and evaluated for over 2 hours until given the approval for MFSL specifications.

    Second, every single ULTRADISC™ DVD-R is tested as it comes off the replication line. High tech, extremely sophisticated computer analysis is used to test jitter, thickness tolerances, gold uniformity and disc eccentricity.

    Third, an inspector (wearing gloves) picks up and visually examines the ULTRADISC™ DVD-R’s for pinholes, gold consistency, oyster
    shelling, or any other anomalies.

    Fourth, another inspector repeats this very time-consuming, manual/visual examination just before the specialized, stray-reflection-reducing black coating is applied.
    ULTRADISC™ DVD-R’s have to pass all levels of QC before they can be shipped. If a disc does not pass Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab’s elevated specifications, it will not be accepted as an ULTRADISC™ DVD-R. This is MFSL’s guarantee to the user that every ULTRADISC™ DVD-R is the finest engineered recordable media available.

  22. #22
    Suspended 3-LockBox's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Hey! Over here!
    Posts
    2,746
    Maybe Mofi will come out with half-speed mastered CDs

  23. #23
    all around good guy Jim Clark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    In a dead sea of fluid mercury
    Posts
    1,900
    Quote Originally Posted by PeruvianSkies
    From MOFI's website....

    ULTRADISC DVD-R – The Ultimate Archival Media
    The 24 Karat Gold ULTRADISC™ DVD-R is designed for professional, data critical, music and graphic archival applications, and all other data storage where there is no room for loss or error. These specially gold plated ULTRADISC™ DVD-R’s ensure excellent reflectivity, no corrosion, and dramatically improved resistance to light and heat. Additional features include instantaneous pit burning (burst burning) for superior pit formation and extremely low to no error rate; and an added, patented, scratch resistant, protective surface. Due to these features, little if any error correction is required upon retrieval of information, producing precise reproduction of stored data. The average DVD-R has a projected lifespan of 20 years—if stored in ideal conditions. Accelerated aging tests show that the ULTRADISC™ DVD-R retains its specifications for more than 100 years. Now information can be accurately stored and retrieved virtually forever.

    24 Karat Gold Layer
    Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab created the world’s first 24 Karat Gold music CD in 1987, the ULTRADISC™. Now MFSL has put that expertise into the development of the ULTRADISC™ DVD-R. The combination of the superior reflectivity and longevity of 99.99% pure 24 Karat Gold, plus a specialized, patented bonding agent, ensures that the ULTRADISC™ DVD-R will never oxidize and fail to output information, as many commercially available DVD-R’s do. The ULTRADISC™ DVD-R is extremely stable in the real world environment.

    Data Guard
    The ULTRADISC™ DVD-R utilizes a state-of-the-art scratch and chemical resistant coating that provides unprecedented protection. This extremely resilient material is impervious to chemicals and 7 times more scratch resistant than an uncoated disc. DATAGUARD treated discs greatly reduce the possibility of uncorrectable errors. If a disc is accidentally mis-handled DATAGUARD will lower error correction during playback, therefore improving read accuracy.

    Proprietary Photosensitive Dye
    Unlike commonly used DVD-R’s containing Cyanine or Azo, which can lose their characteristics quickly from exposure to light and heat, the ULTRADISC™ DVD-R utilizes a patented photosensitive dye which ensures accurate burning and stability, plus exceptional longevity and durability. Whereas the two other types of dye are formed with linear molecular structures, which break down easily when exposed to the elements, the unique photosensitive dye utilized in the ULTRADISC™ DVD-R has an annular structure which forms a strong and stable chemical bond.

    Extremely Accurate and Precise Burning
    When recording speeds are increased three major problems occur. Parity of inner-code (PI) errors rise as a result of an increase of laser burning power which leads to pitch (pit?) deformation. As burning speeds rise so does signal jitter due to thermal interference. Furthermore, higher speeds cause vibration in the drive when burning the disc, increasing mechanical jitter. MFSL engineers urge professionals to burn their data in
    real time, better known as 1X for the most accurate results.

    Accurate and Precise Information Retrieval
    The ULTRADISC™ DVD-R’s specialized dye reacts more quickly to the writing laser than do other dyes. It reacts in a "burst" mode instead of the sluggish "melt" mode. Due to this instantaneous reaction, precise pit edges are formed. This is crucial for the laser pickup to
    accurately interpret the information, and thereby reducing or eliminating the use of interpolation/error correction circuitry. Additionally, a specially formulated, black ink is used to coat one side of the disc in order to reduce stray reflections which could alter readings.

    Ultra Quality Control - 4 Levels of QC
    Utilizing the highest quality control standards in the industry, all the manufacturing and packaging of the ULTRADISC™ DVD-R is done in
    state-of-the-art cleanroom conditions. Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab has rejected random sampling techniques, which are simply not stringent enough for critical data storage applications. Instead, MFSL utilizes an unprecedented 4-level quality control process.
    First, a sample out of every 3,000 discs is tested, critically examined and evaluated for over 2 hours until given the approval for MFSL specifications.

    Second, every single ULTRADISC™ DVD-R is tested as it comes off the replication line. High tech, extremely sophisticated computer analysis is used to test jitter, thickness tolerances, gold uniformity and disc eccentricity.

    Third, an inspector (wearing gloves) picks up and visually examines the ULTRADISC™ DVD-R’s for pinholes, gold consistency, oyster
    shelling, or any other anomalies.

    Fourth, another inspector repeats this very time-consuming, manual/visual examination just before the specialized, stray-reflection-reducing black coating is applied.
    ULTRADISC™ DVD-R’s have to pass all levels of QC before they can be shipped. If a disc does not pass Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab’s elevated specifications, it will not be accepted as an ULTRADISC™ DVD-R. This is MFSL’s guarantee to the user that every ULTRADISC™ DVD-R is the finest engineered recordable media available.
    I wouldn't say it's bullxxxx. They do not claim their discs sound better anywhere in that little schpiel. They do say they last longer, are sturdier, and have a superior QC process. I would probably be inclined to believe that. They've got to do something to warrant a premium price tag. Gold has to sound better than aluminum, doesn't it : )
    They do imply a lot of stuff, but stop short of making unverified claims. Pretty much supports what Troy wrote in his first post from what I see.

    The only thing I can see is the burn in real time (1x) theory. If you happen to buy into that, and I don't, you could apply that standard to any old CDR/DVDR.

    Regards,
    jc
    "Ahh, cartoons! America's only native art form. I don't count jazz 'cuz it sucks"- Bartholomew J. Simpson

  24. #24
    Musicaholic Forums Moderator ForeverAutumn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    9,769
    Rich, if you're having problems with pops and hissing, make sure that you aren't doing anything else on your computer while you're burning a disk. My experience is that disks burn better if there is no other computer activity to get in the way. I walk away from the computer and come back when it's finished.

  25. #25
    Close 'n Play® user Troy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Highway 6, between Tonopah and Ely
    Posts
    2,318
    Quote Originally Posted by 3-LockBox
    He said "but the pits on the music discs were specially formulated for music". I told him the pits on his face were specially formulated for celibacy.
    LOL

    He's here all week, try the veal.

Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •