Widescreen TV?

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  • 11-04-2004, 04:20 PM
    Marc B.
    Widescreen TV?
    Will all TV's be widescreen one day?
    Does anyone know anything about this or when this might happen?
    Which 42 inch TV would you pick?
    Also what type?

    Thanks,
    Marc
  • 11-04-2004, 06:33 PM
    woodman
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Marc B.
    Will all TV's be widescreen one day?
    Does anyone know anything about this or when this might happen?
    Which 42 inch TV would you pick?
    Also what type?

    Thanks,
    Marc

    It's not really likely that the day will ever come when all TV sets are "widescreen". When most sets are ..... certainly. But it will happen over a good number of years - somewhere between 10-15 years according to my crystal ball.

    The conversion to a new digital TV system which has already been underway for 5-6 years will bring about a day when all TV sets in the marketplace are digital - but this wil also take a good number of years to accomplish - probably another 6-10 years would be my best guess.

    Regarding which 42" TV to pick: you don't say just what you're expecting to do with it, or how long you're hoping it will last, or what signal sources you'll be playing through it, or what your budget is for it, etc. If you're looking for the "biggest bang for the buck", you'll get that with either a DLP or LCD-based front projector from InFocus, Epson, Sanyo, or Sharp ... or, a CRT-based rear projector from Toshiba or Hitachi.

    Hope this helps you
  • 11-04-2004, 07:29 PM
    hershon
    Take it from me buy a widescreen TV I was a sceptic at first
    Because alot of these moronic chain stores like Best Buy have HD TV's on with nonHD programing alot of the time, the picture on a widescreen looks distorted and out of focus. Because of that I was almost stupid enough to buy a large nonwidescreen HDTV but was basically stopped because enough people on this board told me what a numbscull I would be and they were right. For HD broadcasts, the only way to see the picture correctly is on widescreen and the image looks perfect and not out of focus and distorted. If you see the HD Broadcast on a nonwidescreen TV it will look distorted etc. i don't know how it looks so proportional on a widescreen but it does. For non HD broadcasts, the best way to see it on your HD TV is to use something called a 4:3 picture but unfortunately doing that results in left and right nonobtrusive for me boarders. When you rent a DVD in alot of cases the best way of watching it if its not widescreen is under the "stretch" or expanded stretch option (the names seem to vary). As a general rule most HD shows are broadcast on the networks during prime time, most sports events as well as HBO & Showtime. You have to pay about $7 or so to watch HD on cable which provides you wish an HD receiver so you don't need to buy an HD TV just an HD ready TV which is alot cheaper. You can digitally record HD on a DVR which my cable company rents for another $10 a month.

    Bottom line, if HD is important to you buy a widescreen. You can get pretty good deals on an HD Ready TV from one of the chain stores. For instance I paid $1600 including shipping for a 48" HD Ready Mitsubishi & $800 including shipping for a 30" Samsung HD Ready TV. I've just seen a 52" Sony HDTV going for about $1200.



    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Marc B.
    Will all TV's be widescreen one day?
    Does anyone know anything about this or when this might happen?
    Which 42 inch TV would you pick?
    Also what type?

    Thanks,
    Marc

  • 11-06-2004, 05:53 AM
    Independent George
    I'm not as qualified as some others here but i think...
    Some day i think almost all TV's will be of the widescreen format because the movie industry films things in a widescreen format....and i dont think thats gonna change ....i've read some interesting articles about the many formats that movies have been filmed in over the years and they seem to have settles on the almost 16:9 format (its close to this i think its actually 1.77:1 for most movies filmed now)....They have gone up to 3:1 in the past so even a widescreen TV would have a big letterbox look...

    So the Tv industy and the film industy are finally merging on the same format.. i know right now many of the primetime shows are true widescreen (not a stretched version of the show)...and that the people wathing the show on a 4:3 screen are getting a pan and scan version of the show (so they actually dont get the whole picture now).....

    so thing will change soon i think ...think of it ths way its a guys great excuse to get a widescreen tv... :p :D :p

    I know it worked for me...i have a hitachi 60" LCD projection TV and its awesome...i wont even watch my 32" toshiba anymore..
  • 11-06-2004, 06:10 AM
    Independent George
    herson has a good point i forgot to mention..
    I was assuming that whoever read my last post knew i meant high definition TV is the only way to go...herson is write the people at best buy do HDTV a dis-service by playing non HDTV brodcasts.....its truely amazing when you see things in a true HD brodcast...also the source material varies among high Def brocasts depending on how things are filmed i think??

    I know when you see a network program or a live sports brocast in HD its very good BUT when you look at the InHD channels and the Discovery HD they sure seem even crisper...so i think its the source material.......

    Also DVD's look awesome on HDTV....However from my understand the DVD can only produce 480p (progressive scan)...which is not true HD....but i purchased a DVD player the upconverts the DVD signal to 720P or 1080i and it looks awesome......not really sure if it was worth it to get the upconvert from a progressive scan DVD (480p)...because i've never tested teh 480p it on my new HDTV...but for the extra $150 dollars for the upconverting DVD i thought what the hell...i've already spent over $3000 on a TV...

    Well have fun.