• 07-04-2011, 12:39 PM
    02audionoob
    Streaming solutions for older TV sets?
    With current technology, wifi-enabled TV sets can stream NetFlix from your wireless network. If I wanted to do that on an older TV set, what do you suppose would be the best way? Is there a device that does only that? Or maybe the best solution is a wifi BluRay player? Or a PS3? What's the most-economical solution?

    I'm not particular about the output...HDMI, component, even S-video or composite might be fine. This would be used on a 24-inch LCD that I watch from 10 feet away.
  • 07-04-2011, 01:48 PM
    pixelthis
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by 02audionoob View Post
    With current technology, wifi-enabled TV sets can stream NetFlix from your wireless network. If I wanted to do that on an older TV set, what do you suppose would be the best way? Is there a device that does only that? Or maybe the best solution is a wifi BluRay player? Or a PS3? What's the most-economical solution?

    I'm not particular about the output...HDMI, component, even S-video or composite might be fine. This would be used on a 24-inch LCD that I watch from 10 feet away.

    ps3 probably.
    I WAS ASKED about this today by a friend, but short of buying a new TV you are going to need an external source.
    A BLU player would be cheaper. I PAID 68 bucks for one that could stream from the net.:1:
  • 07-05-2011, 04:20 PM
    Woochifer
    I'd suggest that you look up the streaming offerings from the different devices on the market. They're very different from model to model. Most streaming devices have Netflix built in, but there are a bunch of other apps out there such as Pandora, Vudu, Amazon Cinema, Google TV, Blockbuster, etc. Most of these streaming services cost extra, and their program choices differ a lot.

    If you're just looking to access downloaded content from your computer, there are other options such as memory card/USB memory slots and streaming access to DLNA servers.

    Blu-ray players are probably the most cost effective devices on the market for streaming video. HOWEVER, if you don't have a wired internet connection nearby and need to connect via wi-fi, that's where you need to watch out on the price.

    Streaming video is included with most of Samsung, Sony, and Panasonic's Blu-ray players, with prices starting around $100. But, if you need wi-fi, the wireless dongles will cost you close to $60. Yeah, you can get a wireless bridge or a Powerline networking setup for around the same cost, but it's just needless complexity.

    Another option is the PS3, which costs about $300, but has built in wi-fi and numerous capabilities as a media player/server.

    Other devices out there include Apple TV and the Vudu set-top boxes. Apple TV no longer includes an optical disc player, but it has a great interface, streams Netflix, and allows you to stream Apple's large video-on-demand library (other options have no access to iTunes).
  • 07-05-2011, 07:41 PM
    02audionoob
    Thanks for the thoughts, guys. This would be used for probably only NetFlix for the time being. I had been debating just putting a small Windows computer on it, but decided a dedicated device would have a simpler, more elegant interface and the machine would be quieter. Is a PS3 silent, or close enough?
  • 07-06-2011, 11:27 AM
    Woochifer
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by 02audionoob View Post
    Thanks for the thoughts, guys. This would be used for probably only NetFlix for the time being. I had been debating just putting a small Windows computer on it, but decided a dedicated device would have a simpler, more elegant interface and the machine would be quieter. Is a PS3 silent, or close enough?

    If you're just using it for Netflix, one factor in the PS3's favor is that it's the only device that streams Netflix at 1080p with 5.1 audio.

    My broadband connection isn't fast enough to sustain the highest HD picture quality on Netflix, so I can't say how it compares with Blu-ray using the highest quality level. With a 3.0 Mbps connection, the picture quality isn't even up to the level of most HD TV broadcasts.

    I have one of the older PS3 models, and I've never noticed the fan noise. The newer PS3 slim models purportedly run much cooler, so I'd assume fan noise isn't an issue there either.
  • 07-06-2011, 11:28 AM
    Woochifer
    BTW, I posted a thread that links to an article summarizing the different video streaming options.

    http://forums.audioreview.com/news-rumors/state-streaming-overview-video-options-36824.html
  • 07-07-2011, 09:17 AM
    L.J.
    I use PS3's on all my systems, but use a Roku XD to get Netflix (also Pandora and a bunch of other content) in the garage/gym.