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  1. #1
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    RX-V1400 Sound Levels?

    Just upgraded my system from RX-V800 to RX-V1400. I noticed the volume at the same level on the RX-V1400 is lower than the RX-V800 (both use the digital volume control). I have my same TV, and all my same speakers as I used with the RX-V800. With the RX-V800 I would set my TV volume to 15 and the RX-V800's volume would be set to -36 db which would give a good listening level. DVD's on the RX-V800 had a comfortable listening level of around -37 db...same DVD with the RX-V1400 needs a -18 to -20db to achieve the same listening level. Is this normal or is there something wrong with my new RX-V1400?

    I ran the YPAO....and tweaked a few settings. Results of the YPAO shows no errors so my speakers polarity are just fine.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ace H
    Just upgraded my system from RX-V800 to RX-V1400. I noticed the volume at the same level on the RX-V1400 is lower than the RX-V800 (both use the digital volume control). I have my same TV, and all my same speakers as I used with the RX-V800. With the RX-V800 I would set my TV volume to 15 and the RX-V800's volume would be set to -36 db which would give a good listening level. DVD's on the RX-V800 had a comfortable listening level of around -37 db...same DVD with the RX-V1400 needs a -18 to -20db to achieve the same listening level. Is this normal or is there something wrong with my new RX-V1400?

    I ran the YPAO....and tweaked a few settings. Results of the YPAO shows no errors so my speakers polarity are just fine.
    Sorry - I don't know the answer to your query. There might be input level controls that are setup differently on the new unit. If you want to find out for sure, I recommend that you call Yamaha Tech Support directly ... they will help you with the definitive answer you're looking for. Here's the number: (714) 522 9105
    woodman

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  3. #3
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    Thanks Woodman. I'll give them a call Monday morning. I'll post back to let you know what their response it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ace H
    Thanks Woodman. I'll give them a call Monday morning. I'll post back to let you know what their response it.
    I also have the RXV-1400 and I know what you mean about the volume. Being that it's rated at 110wpc, I thought it would be louder than it is. When I watch DVD's, I have the volume set at -33 to -25 depending on how loud my fiance lets me have it but it is quite loud in that range. I have noticed that all new receivers seem to have less volume than receivers of the past. I was told that this is due to slow gain in the volume. Older receivers I have had, had fast gain, meaning it got loud fast. I'm ok with the slow gain, I just hope it doesn't hurt the receiver having the volume gain so high. Also, check your sensitivity rating of your speakers, that does make a difference.

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    After running YPAO and letting it check the wiring for speaker polarity, if it displays NO ERROS at all, this should mean that the polarity of the speakers are hooked up correctly?

    Also is there some way to check the adjustments of the PEQ equalizer which YAPO made? I can go into the menu and see the GEQ, but I can't acess the PEQ adjustments.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by JDiddy
    I also have the RXV-1400 and I know what you mean about the volume. Being that it's rated at 110wpc, I thought it would be louder than it is. When I watch DVD's, I have the volume set at -33 to -25 depending on how loud my fiance lets me have it but it is quite loud in that range. I have noticed that all new receivers seem to have less volume than receivers of the past. I was told that this is due to slow gain in the volume. Older receivers I have had, had fast gain, meaning it got loud fast. I'm ok with the slow gain, I just hope it doesn't hurt the receiver having the volume gain so high. Also, check your sensitivity rating of your speakers, that does make a difference.

    I think you were told correctly. Not all receivers have volume increase att he same rate or level.
    No, you will not damage the unit.
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  7. #7
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    The volume numbering / scale is an arbitrary gain unit, which could be different from model to model from the same maker. It has nothing to do with wattage.

  8. #8
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    level

    I also went from the RX-V800 to the RX-V1400. The difference is that the volume range on the 800 is -99db to 0db, and on the 1400 the range is -80db to +16.5db. That should answer your question. The RX-V1400 is certainly not underrated. My system plays LOUD, especially around 0db. I watch all DVDs and TV in DPLII and DD EX and most music listening is DPLII MUSIC.

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    Thanks mustang. I just wanted to make sure I didn't have a defective unit. Like yourself I came from the 800 to 1400 and thought it rather odd that the volume levels would be so different.

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    Ummm....yeah, the +16.5 dB???

    What gives with this +16.5 dB, anyway? I've always been under the impression 0 dB was the reference level at full rated power, but I can only assume it's not with my RX-V1400. According to Yamaha's faq site:
    "Depending on the input source, you can safely turn the volume up to about 15 dB. This will be quite loud, and you have to be careful about clipping the amp, and possibly damaging your speakers."

    That's about 31.5 extra dB's we can't use if this is true. However that FAQ blurb assumes a 0dB to 99dB control range, so maybe it doesn't apply?

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    Just spoke with Yamaha and they said the sound level difference is, in fact, due to the RX-V1400 going to +16 db as opposed to the RX-V800 going to 0 db.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ace H
    Just spoke with Yamaha and they said the sound level difference is, in fact, due to the RX-V1400 going to +16 db as opposed to the RX-V800 going to 0 db.
    Well, that's reassuring...maybe we should advise Yamaha to update their FAQ site then.
    I wonder why the change?
    Does this make +16 dB the "reference level" for the receiver then? That is, would the amps typically drive 110watts per channel in 2-channel stereo mode at this setting?

    Final question...If you use external amplifiers, is there any undesireable consequences to run the receiver at +16 dB? The amps aren't engaged, but is this too hard on the pre-amp section? I rarely exceed -20dB, I'm just curious?

  13. #13
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    i got the rxv2400, its the same thing. the max volume for it is about +16 also. i got mine for around 650 so i went with that instead of the 1400. i usually pay movies at around -15 and its not that loud. its hard to listen to to ppe talk someimes. the special effects are quite loud though.

  14. #14
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    When talking about volume, the control is actually an attenuator with maximum attenuation when the knob fully counter-clockwise. The control is a type of solid-state stepper switch with a specific number of "steps". In the case of the 1400 with 1/2 db steps the switch has 193+ positions. The numbers displayed can be calibrated in 1/2db, 1db steps, or as a percentage of the output dependent upon what values were engineered for each "step" of the control.

    I've made a couple of stepper controls which used a mechanical 30-position switch. Each position had a resistor is series with the previous step with the maximum resistance at the full counter-clockwise position. With each step a resistor is dropped out providing less attenuation thus providing more signal to an op-amp driver for the amplifier circuit. I haven't seen the actual volume circuit for the Yamaha RX-V1400, but feel is has to be similar in design, but solid-state and programmable.

    This is why I don't understand how someone can state a 0db reference level for their amp. If they're talking about the reading they see on their Radio Shack db meter when watching a movie or setting levels, I can go with that. But, if they're talking about what they're seeing on the volume display of the receiver, you can see it is just a "relative" level, one db louder than the last when turning counter-clockwise, one db more than the last when turning clockwise.

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