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  1. #1
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    receiver setting

    I have had a technics SA-DX750 receiver for 5 years but I lost the manual and there is a setting I cannot figure out. There is an option "DR COMP" which I can set to "off", "standard" or "max". What does this setting do?? I've played around with it a little but I haven't been able to figure it out.
    -also, which frequencies are filtered when the speakers are set to small?
    thanks.

  2. #2
    Loving This kexodusc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by audio amateur
    I have had a technics SA-DX750 receiver for 5 years but I lost the manual and there is a setting I cannot figure out. There is an option "DR COMP" which I can set to "off", "standard" or "max". What does this setting do?? I've played around with it a little but I haven't been able to figure it out.
    -also, which frequencies are filtered when the speakers are set to small?
    thanks.
    It looks to me like it stands for "Dynamic Range Compression".
    Ideally you want NO compression. Compression is bad, this makes the loudest sounds and softests sounds closer in volume than they would be naturally. It's good if you are listening in an apartment and don't want machine guns to be louder than dialogue at night or something, but otherwise isn't a desireable sound feature. Select "Off".

  3. #3
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    Read Carefully This is Where the University of Cambodia Messes With You!

    You need to read the instructions very very carefully, be very much afraid, because my gut instinct tells me that they are written by University of Cambodia graduates- specifically, in some of these instruction books Minimum actually means maximum and maximum means minimum! Seriously. Scrutanize the wording till your sure.

  4. #4
    Forum Regular anamorphic96's Avatar
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    Here is a link for your manual.

    http://www.usersmanualguide.com/pana...ntrol_receiver

    Kexodusc is correct in that it is a dynamic range compressor.

    After looking through your manual. You will want this set to OFF.

  5. #5
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    what would I do without you guys? thanks alot.
    Any thoughts about where the low frequency filter kicks in when speakers are set to "small"?

  6. #6
    Forum Regular paul_pci's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by audio amateur
    what would I do without you guys? thanks alot.
    Any thoughts about where the low frequency filter kicks in when speakers are set to "small"?
    Sub, if you have one.

  7. #7
    Loving This kexodusc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by paul_pci
    Sub, if you have one.
    I think he's asking at what frequency is the filter at, or what frequency is the LFE filter centered at.

    The answer - who knows. Back a few years ago most receivers were locked in between 80-120 Hz. 90 and 100 were the two most common I can recall. A few Sony's I remember had the LFE set at 120 Hz. Great for sub/satellite combos where the sats disappeared below 120 Hz. Bad for larger monitors though.

    One could always download some test tones or use a HT calibration DVD's tones to test.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by kexodusc
    I think he's asking at what frequency is the filter at, or what frequency is the LFE filter centered at.

    The answer - who knows. Back a few years ago most receivers were locked in between 80-120 Hz. 90 and 100 were the two most common I can recall. A few Sony's I remember had the LFE set at 120 Hz. Great for sub/satellite combos where the sats disappeared below 120 Hz. Bad for larger monitors though.

    One could always download some test tones or use a HT calibration DVD's tones to test.
    True say!!! kexodusc you seem to have an answer for absolutely everything... I have a high esteem for you! haha. yep I was not talking about the filter for the L.F.E signal but for speakers. In that case it's good.. My Velodyne's only extend to 80Hz so I'm glad there are no lower frequencies going to them.. the bad thing is the integrated power protection circuitry. It's horrible!! All I need is to pump the volume a little and boom it kicks in. I can't even listen to music at a decent level. On top of that one of the woofers on the rear speakers isn't working because the two lead wires that connect to the voice cool weren't long enough to leave enough headroom for "high" excursion diaphragm mouvement... I'm quite disappointed with Velodyne. I hope they do a better job on there subs which they are known for.

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