DTS where did it go?

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  • 03-29-2009, 11:56 AM
    recoveryone
    DTS where did it go?
    Its been a while since I posted on here, but I still in the game of HT. I notice in the last few months that the DVD's I been buying are not coming with the DTS sound track. Is this a move on the studios part to save money or another ploy to make us slow to upgrade people, move up to Blu ray take the plunge so we can get a DTS sound track again.? :nonod:
  • 03-29-2009, 08:12 PM
    pixelthis
    1 Attachment(s)
    Look on BLU, its just common sense really.
    Why go all out on a DVD when you can do it with BLU?
    The peeps who really care about PQ are gonna have BLU players anyway.
    Look for DVDs' to get cheaper and cheaper, BTW:1:
  • 03-29-2009, 08:21 PM
    Woochifer
    I think the declining frequency of DTS tracks is part of the general trend towards DVDs becoming more barebones for the primary release. Two-disc sets are no longer the norm, and as such these DVDs have to cram a lot more onto a single disc than before, since it seems that there's more of a demand for the bonus features. Two-disc releases are now mostly released concurrently with a single-disc edition with a higher list price. The higher list prices on two-disc DVD editions are no accident. They are now only about $1 or $2 cheaper than the Blu-ray price, making an argument for consumers who want the special editions to move up to Blu-ray. I suspect DVD special editions will become less frequent, as the studios move more and more of the special features into Blu-ray.

    With Blu-ray, the audio is better across the board, and DTS is fully supported as an official audio format for the Blu-ray format (with the DVD, DTS was strictly an optional format). Even the Dolby Digital tracks on Blu-ray discs use the higher bitrate 640k version, which is only a step down from the typical 763k DTS tracks and is free from the high frequency channel joining that weighs down the 384k and 448k DD tracks that come with DVDs.

    Also, you need to consider who released DTS tracks in the first place. Warner and Dolby have been partners from the inception of the DVD format, and aside from a couple of group sets that used DTS tracks, they've never supported the format. Sony was also never a DTS supporter, and only used DTS on their now discontinued Superbit series and a handful of other releases. Paramount also supported DTS only sporadically.

    This leaves Universal/Dreamworks, Disney, and Fox as the most prominent supporters of DTS. Universal was DTS' primary supporter for years, and early on did a lot of dual inventory releases. No surprise considering that Universal has an ownership stake in DTS. This makes it all the more problematic to see Universal basically dropping DTS from nearly all of their recent releases.
  • 05-08-2009, 09:27 AM
    recoveryone
    Thanks Woo for that info, I guess I'll just suffer a few more years then, cause I know the wife is not going to let me redue half my systems just to get better level of sound. She still doesn't get the difference between old analog broadcast and HiDef digital ones. She says "it looks the same to me" I just shake my head and turn to the HiDef channel of what she is watching. I'll guess I can still troll through the old DVD's at Wal-Mart and get a great deal on them for $5.00 (pick up a DTS copy of Master and Commander)
  • 05-08-2009, 01:45 PM
    Woochifer
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by recoveryone
    Thanks Woo for that info, I guess I'll just suffer a few more years then, cause I know the wife is not going to let me redue half my systems just to get better level of sound. She still doesn't get the difference between old analog broadcast and HiDef digital ones. She says "it looks the same to me" I just shake my head and turn to the HiDef channel of what she is watching. I'll guess I can still troll through the old DVD's at Wal-Mart and get a great deal on them for $5.00 (pick up a DTS copy of Master and Commander)

    All the more reason to try the simpler upgrade by moving up to Blu-ray. If you already have a HDTV, adding a BD player is the no-brainer upgrade. Not only do you get that great HD picture, but you also get higher resolution audio EVEN IF you keep your current audio setup as is.

    If you look at the audio formats used on Blu-rays, you'll see that nearly all of the newer Disney and Fox releases now use DTS-HD Master audio. This is a lossless audio format that replicates the resolution of the original master if your receiver can decode it. But, it will also downsample to 1.5k DTS if you use an older receiver. This 1.5k resolution is DOUBLE the 763k resolution that's used on most of the DTS tracks that come with DVDs.

    And on those Blu-ray titles that do not use DTS, even the Dolby Digital audio tracks are encoded at a higher 640k resolution than the 448/384k tracks that come with DVDs. In my listenings, 640k DD is a noticeable improvement in audio quality, particularly with the imaging precision.

    Right now, you already have internet-connected Blu-ray players selling for $250, and by the holidays, analysts are projecting that most players will sell for $200 or below, with off-brand models going for around $100. Features like Netflix streaming playback have also been added to some models.
  • 05-08-2009, 05:45 PM
    recoveryone
    The Vizio has the HDMI, but the MIts does not and that is where I would want to but the Blu-Ray, so its the cost of a new (at lest 55" or bigger HD set) and a player to boot.