Denon Question

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  • 03-08-2006, 09:28 PM
    EdwardGein
    Denon Question
    Would appreciate an answer to this from any Denon owners ( I have an AVR 3801, I assume your receiver has similar capacity on alot of things). Anyway, while updating my DVD setup- amazing how one sees they might have missed something they weren't aware of awhile ago, it asked me what limit my receiver has in regards to PCM limits: 48 mhz, 96mhz or no limits.
    I originally put down no limit, which means anything over 96. Is this correct? The DVD instruction book says the DVD player will down sample any program with higher sample rates so it is compatible with my receiver. What in plain English does this mean? Thanks for any answers.
  • 03-08-2006, 10:51 PM
    Woochifer
    The question's irrelevant unless you're playing DVDs that contain 96/24 resolution PCM soundtracks with copy protection that requires that the digital output downsample the signal to 48 kHz. Very few discs fit this description, so whatever option you go with won't matter 99.99% of the time.
  • 03-09-2006, 02:38 AM
    EdwardGein
    Thanks for info
  • 03-09-2006, 04:37 AM
    kexodusc
    Yeah, if you had a 96 kHz soundtrack, the worst that could happen is the player would downsample it to 48 Hz, which may or may not reduce sound quality to that of your basic CD/DVD, give or take. Not a big deal.
  • 03-09-2006, 07:06 AM
    N. Abstentia
    You'd have to get a thicker optical cable to support that much resolution anyway. A normal optical cable can't transmit enough light for that much resolution. Or better yet, splice two of them together to double your light output.
  • 03-09-2006, 07:50 AM
    kexodusc
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by N. Abstentia
    You'd have to get a thicker optical cable to support that much resolution anyway. A normal optical cable can't transmit enough light for that much resolution. Or better yet, splice two of them together to double your light output.

    This is true, but most of us just bi-process 96 kHz signals, using an optical and coaxial cable. The Coax of course gets the lows, the optical the highs.
  • 03-09-2006, 09:59 AM
    JeffKnob
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by kexodusc
    This is true, but most of us just bi-process 96 kHz signals, using an optical and coaxial cable. The Coax of course gets the lows, the optical the highs.

    I just use a high quality Monster Cable garden hose to get that kind of resolution. Only water can handle that much information. Bottled water that is. Tap water introduces too much jitter.

    :D
  • 03-09-2006, 10:33 AM
    GMichael
    Aren't you guys being a little rough on Ed?
  • 03-09-2006, 11:14 AM
    kexodusc
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by GMichael
    Aren't you guys being a little rough on Ed?

    Rough on Ed? I thought we were just being general smart asses to nobody in particular...did I miss an inside joke somewhere? N. Abstentia's?
  • 03-09-2006, 11:29 AM
    N. Abstentia
    LOL! He's probably referring to Ed's optical cable thread that Ed lost track of when it got moved to the cable forum. Since Ed didn't follow it there to defend himself, everybody kinda teed off on him in that thread :)
  • 03-09-2006, 11:30 AM
    N. Abstentia
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by kexodusc
    This is true, but most of us just bi-process 96 kHz signals, using an optical and coaxial cable. The Coax of course gets the lows, the optical the highs.

    CRAP I never thought of bi-wiring my digital outputs! How could I have been so obtuse???

    :12: