Worlds Greatest Systems.

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  • 08-21-2012, 01:31 AM
    frenchmon
    Worlds Greatest Systems.
    JM...on the second system, after the end of the interview, he is playing a song...I believe its "Adagio for Strings composed by Tomaso Albinoni:". But there are several who are doing this tune. I would like the one at the end of the interview. Do you have any Idea who it is thats playing that one?
    Perhaps you Feanor...or E-Stat?

    WGAS
  • 08-21-2012, 06:51 AM
    Florian
    The bottom video shows Advantgarde Duos i believe with Lamm Monoblocks. The top video are Wilson X2s or Grans Slamms with Tenor Monoblocks. They are hybrids i believe.

    **Sorry thought you needed the equipment :-)
  • 08-21-2012, 08:43 AM
    frenchmon
    Ahhh Come on! All you classical heads can't help me out????
  • 08-21-2012, 09:28 AM
    tube fan
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by frenchmon View Post
    Ahhh Come on! All you classical heads can't help me out????

    This is one of my reference records that I use to test new systems. It's the "Adagio d'Albinoni" record (the Adagio in G minor cut) with Gary Karr on double-bass, and Harmon Lewis on organ. It's a beautiful piece of music, and it's superbly recorded. BTW, the vinyl simply destroys the CD version. When I first heard this record at a Stereophile audio show, the representative of the Oracle room played the CD version, which was excellent. When he played the vinyl cut, I just started crying as the music was so emotionally moving. At the recent 2012 CAS, this record again brought me to tears in the Vivid room. However, no tears or goose bumps when they played the same record in the $500,000 Wilson room.
  • 08-21-2012, 11:49 AM
    E-Stat
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by tube fan View Post
    It's the "Adagio d'Albinoni" record (the Adagio in G minor cut) with Gary Karr on double-bass, and Harmon Lewis on organ.

    Is this it TF?

    Musicdirect link

    The version on the video is a nice rendition.
  • 08-21-2012, 01:14 PM
    RGA
    I believe I have this on CD as well and the recording is so-so. I also have it on LP but I have not heard it yet - picked up 500 LPs in M- or better for free.

    Unfortunately, I am heading back to HK and I have my turntable up for consignment. :-(
  • 08-21-2012, 04:20 PM
    frenchmon
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by tube fan View Post
    This is one of my reference records that I use to test new systems. It's the "Adagio d'Albinoni" record (the Adagio in G minor cut) with Gary Karr on double-bass, and Harmon Lewis on organ. It's a beautiful piece of music, and it's superbly recorded. BTW, the vinyl simply destroys the CD version. When I first heard this record at a Stereophile audio show, the representative of the Oracle room played the CD version, which was excellent. When he played the vinyl cut, I just started crying as the music was so emotionally moving. At the recent 2012 CAS, this record again brought me to tears in the Vivid room. However, no tears or goose bumps when they played the same record in the $500,000 Wilson room.

    Started crying??. Emotionally moving??? That's what I'm talking about! Now you understand why I was crying for help! The little piece I did hear had my eyes watered. I will go and seek the LP now and make a purchase. Thanks Tube Fan.
  • 08-21-2012, 04:29 PM
    frenchmon
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by E-Stat View Post
    Is this it TF?

    Musicdirect link

    The version on the video is a nice rendition.

    Yes the one in the video is really nice. Yes I would also like to know is this the same one in the video?
  • 08-21-2012, 04:47 PM
    frenchmon
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by RGA View Post
    I believe I have this on CD as well and the recording is so-so. I also have it on LP but I have not heard it yet - picked up 500 LPs in M- or better for free.

    Unfortunately, I am heading back to HK and I have my turntable up for consignment. :-(

    well ship your vinyl to me...I will even pay shipping cost.
  • 08-21-2012, 08:29 PM
    tube fan
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by E-Stat View Post
    Is this it TF?

    Musicdirect link

    The version on the video is a nice rendition.

    That's it. I only have the 33 version, so I'll be getting the 45 version.
  • 08-22-2012, 05:17 AM
    E-Stat
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by frenchmon View Post
    Started crying??. Emotionally moving??? That's what I'm talking about! Now you understand why I was crying for help!

    If you recall, it was also used in the soundtrack for Platoon. Similarly, there's some really nice stuff in another war movie: Thin Red Line. "Air" is particularly nice - it opens with thunderous drums (hear that through Scaena depth charges) and transitions to a nice flowing medley.
  • 08-22-2012, 06:30 AM
    frenchmon
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by E-Stat View Post
    If you recall, it was also used in the soundtrack for Platoon. Similarly, there's some really nice stuff in another war movie: Thin Red Line. "Air" is particularly nice - it opens with thunderous drums (hear that through Scaena depth charges) and transitions to a nice flowing medley.


    Hmmmm....thanks E-stat! You just reminded me I have an old soundtract from the movie Platoon on vinyl. I will have to dig it out when I get home.
  • 08-22-2012, 06:33 AM
    frenchmon
    What is air?
  • 08-22-2012, 07:25 AM
    frenchmon
    a little history behind. Adagio in G minor Adagio in G minor - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    The Adagio in G minor for violin, strings and organ continuo, is a neo-Baroque composition popularly attributed to the 18th-century Venetian master Tomaso Albinoni, but composed by the 20th-century musicologist and Albinoni biographer Remo Giazotto and based on the purported discovery of a manuscript fragment from Albinoni.

    Although the composition is often referred to as "Albinoni's Adagio," or "Adagio in G minor by Albinoni, arranged by Giazotto," the attribution is incorrect. The ascription to Albinoni rests upon Giazotto's purported discovery of a tiny manuscript fragment (consisting of a few opening measures of the melody line and basso continuo portion) from a slow second movement of an otherwise unknown Albinoni trio sonata. According to Giazotto, he obtained the document shortly after the end of World War II from the Saxon State Library in Dresden, which − though its buildings were destroyed in the bombing raids of February and March 1945 by the British and American Air Forces − had evacuated and preserved most of its collection. Giazotto concluded that the manuscript fragment was a portion of a church sonata (sonata da chiesa, one of two standard forms of the trio sonata) in G minor composed by Albinoni, possibly as part of his Op. 4 set, around 1708. In his account, Giazotto then constructed the balance of the complete single-movement work based on this fragmentary theme. He copyrighted it and published it in 1958, under a title which, translated into English, reads "Adagio in G Minor for Strings and Organ, on Two Thematic Ideas and on a Figured Bass by Tomaso Albinoni".[1] Giazotto never produced the manuscript fragment, and since his death in 1998 no official record of its presence in the collection of the Saxon State Library has been found.[2] However, the discovery by musicologist Muska Mangano, Giazotto's last assistant, of a modern but independent manuscript transcription of the figured bass portion and six fragmentary bars of the first violin, "bearing in the top right-hand corner a stamp stating unequivocally the Dresden provenance of the original from which it was taken," provides some support for Giazotto's account that Albinoni was his source.[3] The scholarly consensus is that the Adagio is Giazotto's composition, whatever source may have inspired him.
    The piece is most commonly orchestrated for string ensemble and organ, or string ensemble alone, but has achieved a level of fame such that it is commonly transcribed for other instruments. The Italian conductor Ino Savini (1904–1995) transcribed the Adagio for a large orchestra and conducted the piece himself in Ostrava in 1967 with the Janáček Philharmonic.
    The composition has also permeated popular culture, having been used as background music for such films as Gallipoli, in television programmes, and in advertisements.[4
  • 08-22-2012, 08:17 PM
    tube fan
    At the 2010 CAS, in the Teresonic room, one attendee got them to play a full orchestra version of the "Adagio in G minor". It was excellent, but then the representative of Musical Surroundings who helped set up the room, noticed that I had a record of the same music by Karr and Lewis, and asked if he could play it. It was simply astounding! The bass and organ just filled the room, and, moved several attendees to gasp at the sound! Several listeners asked for the record. It's one of my favorite records, and is a good test of a system's lower end. But it's more than a flat extended low end. Over a great system, Karr's double-bass and Lewis's organ fill the room (as a double-bass and organ can fill up a hall), and the subtle micro dynamic shadings move the listener to goose bumps (or tears).
  • 08-23-2012, 08:55 AM
    frenchmon
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by tube fan View Post
    At the 2010 CAS, in the Teresonic room, one attendee got them to play a full orchestra version of the "Adagio in G minor". It was excellent, but then the representative of Musical Surroundings who helped set up the room, noticed that I had a record of the same music by Karr and Lewis, and asked if he could play it. It was simply astounding! The bass and organ just filled the room, and, moved several attendees to gasp at the sound! Several listeners asked for the record. It's one of my favorite records, and is a good test of a system's lower end. But it's more than a flat extended low end. Over a great system, Karr's double-bass and Lewis's organ fill the room (as a double-bass and organ can fill up a hall), and the subtle micro dynamic shadings move the listener to goose bumps (or tears).

    Well I will be enjoying it when it gets here....I have fell in love with that tune....its in my soul now....I wake up with it on my mine.
  • 08-23-2012, 11:52 AM
    E-Stat
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by frenchmon View Post
    What is air?

    Just the name of the cut. Actually that is the more dramatic lead that transitions directly to the melodic piece called Stone in My Heart that I was really thinking of.

    Here's a visual of Air. Nice slam.

    http://home.cablelynx.com/~rhw/audio/air.jpg

    And here is a short lo-fi MP3 clip I made of the first twenty seconds or so. The sample on Amazon.com didn't include the beginning.
  • 09-03-2012, 09:32 AM
    JohnMichael
    Thanks Frenchmon for starting this thread and all who knew the music. I was not previously aware of the music. I ordered the 45 rpm version along with Ella Fitzgerald "Let No Man Write My Epitaph" also 45 rpm. I am looking forward to some more 45 rpm recordings to play on my push button speed change Rega Planar 2.

    I sure can spend money in my boxers with a glass of wine in one hand and debit card in the other. I wonder how I ever shopped fully dressed and sober. Luckily I am not a hoarder.