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  1. #1
    Suspended PeruvianSkies's Avatar
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    Who Do You Credit????

    Here's a question that I don't know if it has ever been asked before, but who do you credit with your love and passion for both music and a hobby like audio/video?

    For me, I attribute my deep love for music mainly with my grandparents, which my grandmother loved classical and I learned much through her, plus she rooted me on to stick with concert band through the years and into orchestras and symphonic endeavors. My grandparents also were the ones that taught me to initially play guitar and then I pretty much self-taught myself from there.

    My parents used to have decent taste in music, until about 1991 when they started listening to so-called Country music...if that's what you call Billy Ray Cyrus. My mom was the one that turned me on to 2112 by Rush. My dad was a big Boston fan, so that's where I developed a liking for them. I picked up on my own love for oldies, classic rock, and other types of music, but I've always had a curious mind, so I just prowled around and started to have an eclectic taste early on.

    For this hobby I would have to say my friend Nick, who was the one that had a set of PSB speakers back in the 1990's that blew me away and I always wanted to get something similar. He was the one that introduces me into the world of 'audio' and my years working in video stores and such really helped forge my love for HT-related stuff, although I have always been a big film fan and went to school for it as well, but realized that the only way to really make money in Hollywood is to rub shoulders with the right people and sell your soul to Satan. I opted for a career doing Video Production and Graphic Design.

    Many of the people around here though have really helped me over time really get a laser-beam sight on what my goals are in terms of audio-related stuff and I am grateful for much of the knowledge that I have acquired here.

  2. #2
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    That's a mystery to me. As long as I can remember I've gravitated toward music. I would be in the room where the radio was on. I started in grade school collecting 45's and had a record player. It just kept progressing from there. I'm the only one in my family with the disease. My little brother collects some CD's and some what into HT but he picked it up from me and is not nearly as serious about it as I am. I think that's why I've been on AR since I discovered it, I need an outlet, some one to talk to about my hobby.

  3. #3
    Suspended PeruvianSkies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Peabody
    That's a mystery to me. As long as I can remember I've gravitated toward music. I would be in the room where the radio was on. I started in grade school collecting 45's and had a record player. It just kept progressing from there. I'm the only one in my family with the disease. My little brother collects some CD's and some what into HT but he picked it up from me and is not nearly as serious about it as I am. I think that's why I've been on AR since I discovered it, I need an outlet, some one to talk to about my hobby.
    I think most of us are in that same position...it's kinda like...there can't be more than 1 audiophile per family. Therefore, we need each other to talk about or disease.

  4. #4
    stuck on vintage dingus's Avatar
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    for me, it was my older brother who used his paper route to finance a decent (for the day) mid-fi stereo. he also bought albums on a regular basis. since i had never had to put any effort into good sound and music, i pretty much took the enjoyment of music for granted, even after buying my very own stereo for the first time.

    one day my roommate brought home a new album called "True Colours" by Split Enz. never heard of the group or album before. it was cool right out of the sleeve because the vinyl was laser etched in all these neat geometric patterns, even cooler was how it sounded. i had always enjoyed listening to music, and i liked having my own system, but until this album i had never heard music that really grabbed me an held my attention. for the first time i found myself listening critically, discovering nuance and subtlety, gaining an appreciation for musical skill, talent and most of all, creativity. i havent taken my gear or music for granted since.
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  5. #5
    Suspended PeruvianSkies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dingus
    for me, it was my older brother who used his paper route to finance a decent (for the day) mid-fi stereo. he also bought albums on a regular basis. since i had never had to put any effort into good sound and music, i pretty much took the enjoyment of music for granted, even after buying my very own stereo for the first time.

    one day my roommate brought home a new album called "True Colours" by Split Enz. never heard of the group or album before. it was cool right out of the sleeve because the vinyl was laser etched in all these neat geometric patterns, even cooler was how it sounded. i had always enjoyed listening to music, and i liked having my own system, but until this album i had never heard music that really grabbed me an held my attention. for the first time i found myself listening critically, discovering nuance and subtlety, gaining an appreciation for musical skill, talent and most of all, creativity. i havent taken my gear or music for granted since.
    You bring up a very key phrase: listening critically. I think that the majority of the world typically enjoys the sound of music, but for some of us, that isn't good enough, we want to study what we are listening to, and it's not always a deep meditative thing, often times the music moves our soul and grabs us, but our brain is also working as well and it's analyzing what we are experiencing and putting that into some type of formula. For audiophiles we learn how to listen to music and we store memory of sounds in our brains as reference points, which most people are not able to do. We listen to certain musical cues and generate certain feelings and emotions that are often expressed in functional forms, but our entertainment of this hobby mainly exists in that never-ending quest to always have it sound a bit better, move us a bit more, grab us a little longer, and for that...we walk this journey without hesitation.

  6. #6
    I took a headstart... basite's Avatar
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    my dad...
    Life is music!

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  7. #7
    Shostakovich fan Feanor's Avatar
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    My strange case

    Quote Originally Posted by PeruvianSkies
    Here's a question that I don't know if it has ever been asked before, but who do you credit with your love and passion for both music and a hobby like audio/video?

    ....
    Unlike most music and audio folks, I had no one in my family who had any real musical training or gave a hoot about it. As a kid, the only music I hear was the pop stuff of the late '40s and '50's on the radio interspersed with soap operas. I recall when I was quite young my father bought a turntable that could be connected to a radio we owned; his entire collection consisted on a couple of symphonies, Beethoven perhaps. I think they were 78s. He played these rarely. My father die, that radio broke down, and the turntable got pitched.

    I don't know: maybe because I was a shy kid, (hey, I'm still shy at 62), I didn't get to school dances or parties. In any case I just wasn't attracted to Elvis, et al. Somehow, at university I developed some interested in the folk music and Bob Dylan, but I didn't buy any records or equipment untill after I graduated and was working. I bought a Sony cassette player that I attached to my roommates Panasonic compact system. Soon afterwards a friend was working for the Canadian Dynaco distributor, and was able to get me a complete Dynaco system in kit form which I assembled. That was beginning of my interest in better sound and equipment.

    Very soon after that my interest turned to classical music, although the folk and folk/rock continued to be of interest too. I still have one of my earliest classical LPs which is of Vaughan Williams' Greensleaves, The Lark Ascending, etc. -- I haven't listened to it in years; as I recall, it's in bad shape. However much of my early classical interest was with Rennaisance and Baroque.

    With the general decline of in popularity of folk in the late '70s, my interest also waned. I still listen to Joan Baez once in a long, long while, but I'd puke if I had to listen to any of those Gordon Lightfoot albums again.

  8. #8
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    No one that i am aware of,but i have had a deep love for music since i bought my first record around the age of 9.

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  9. #9
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    My love of music and sound started in an odd way. At the age of 7, I was taken to an all day movie and movie serial thingy in a theater on Miami Beach, circa 1953, They apparently played full feature versions of Flash Gordon and Flash Gordon's Trip to Mars.
    The music and sound effects really zingered me. I remember when I came home that I told my mother that I had just seen something great. In actuallity, some of those serials and B movies have extroadinary hi-fi mono sound if one hears the sound from a good print.

  10. #10
    Forum Regular pixelthis's Avatar
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    I used to listen to a 9 volt transistor radio in bed as a child.
    I have always love SCI-FI, reading Bradbury at an early age, and building model rockets.
    My great love of music kinda melded with my great love of technology.
    A place in town sold Mcintosh gear, and linn and dual and thorens tables I beleive.
    They tolerated me, I practically lived there. After seeing the large vu meters glowing blue
    and jumping to the stones, the Zeppelin, and god knows what else I was permantly hooked
    Then I started listening to Jazz, bob james 4, CHICK COREA, ETC, because rock was becoming kinda one demensional , my gear betrayed every flaw, its still my first love
    but jazz will always be it for me.
    I can listen to music on most anything, but nothing beats good music on well designed gear
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  11. #11
    Loving This kexodusc's Avatar
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    For music, hmmm...friends back in school maybe? Don't really know - dad teaches guitar and mom made me learn piano and cello - I hated it as a kid - later in high school I developed an appreciation for it and the whole music loving thing became less about attitude and partying and more about the music being appreciated as art.

    As for a/v...I credit myself. I have an uncle who runs an a/v shop and my dad always had some gear around but oddly enough I never cared much or thought much of it until a few years after I left home. Stereo stuff became a way to reproduce my first passion, which was the music. I suppose they helped me out with some gear when I was in college "starting out".

    I still listen to more music on crappy car stereos and planes than my systems. You know what? I don't enjoy the music any less....the a/v hobby was always just a means to an end...But I also build speakers because I enjoy that too, most of which I don't keep for myself or spend very much time listening to.

  12. #12
    Music Junkie E-Stat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pixelthis
    I used to listen to a 9 volt transistor radio in bed as a child.
    I have always love SCI-FI, reading Bradbury at an early age, and building model rockets.
    Same for me, except that my Zenith AM portable used a pair of AA batteries. I built and flew a number of Estes rockets. Like Feanor, such interest was not shared by anyone else in my family. My interest, nevertheless grew. In my teens, I read all the commercial mags and by age seventeen, had put together a decent double Advent based system. I, too, used to visit all the local shops in the Atlanta area and then it happened. A new one opened in the Sandy Springs area that ultimately changed everything for me. The owner (later friend and boss during college) exposed me to Magneplanars, Audio Research, and classical music. It was through that store I also met two different reviewers from The Absolute Sound who launched my awareness of both classical music and audio to a completely different plane.

    Over the past three decades, these three mentors had a powerful effect on my tuteladge. As a member of the board of the ASO, Dr. Cooledge got me involved with one of their earliest recordings for Telarc, The Firebird back in 1978. It was hearing his Dayton-Wright electrostats that formed my love of that breed. Over that space of time, my sound reference has been completely recalibrated more than once by hearing the Sea Cliff systems. It is fun to hear what is possible.

    At the end of the day, however, it is all about the music. On my diskman, computers, car stereo - whatever and wherever. I probably spend more time listening to my vintage garage system than the main one upstairs. Music has a powerful emotional effect on me. Hearing a bit of Indiana Jones on the computer at the moment.

    rw

  13. #13
    Super Moderator Site Moderator JohnMichael's Avatar
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    My love of music also started with a transistor radio. Growing up in a small oppressive town in Ohio I loved listening to the Chicago AM radio stations at night. During the late 60's and early 70's before FM took over it was amazing to me that I was able to listen to radio from so far away. I was able to hear all the new songs and there was a show called Dick Biondi and friends where he would interview musicians and artists.

    When I noticed my mother never used the record player I took it over. My first 45 was the Fifth Dimensions' "Stoned Soul Picnic" and first album was Blood Sweat and Tears. My sister was listening to the Beatles and one day brought home Carole King's "Tapestry". I was hooked for many years by the singer songwriter.

    During those days I was also into model rocketry and building slot cars and racing them at the local slot car track. This is what might have started my need to tweak.
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  14. #14
    Da Dragonball Kid L.J.'s Avatar
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    I'd have to give credit to my mother who always had music playing when I was a kid. Mostly oldies, Motown and stuff like that. As a teen I took my own interest in music and started purchasing lots of cassette tapes. I would spend a few hours once a week at a local music shop digging through used bins.

    I remember buying a portable cassette player that sounded like crap so I took it back and got a more expensive on that sounded like crap but a little better. I would spend hours listening to the radio and flying to it, to hit record, when a song I liked came on. Sometimes I would record music while I was sleeping and filter through the tape the next day to find out who the artists were, so I could pick up their album, hopefully used.

    After I got married and my wife and I moved into our first apartment, one of the first things I wanted to get was a stereo system. So I headed off with a budget of about $400 to the local Sears type store called Wards. Now my parents always owned a all-in-one stereo in a box kinda thing so I had no clue what to look for. The guy at the store showed me a Panasonic Prologic HTIB and told me how it could play music and do surround sound for VHS movies. Surround sound, what the heck is that?

    So I got this thing home, hooked it up, put on Top Gun and was like, WOW! Later on I got a Kenwood cassette and CD player and my music never sounded better. Then a bad thing happened. We went to visit my wife's family in Arizona and her dad had a full HT system, don't remember which speakers he had at the time, but his gear was all Pioneer Elite. He put on Saving Private Ryan and The Matrix DVD's. I realized what I had at home was not a HT system.

    Once we got back home it was straight to CC. To make a long story short, I went through a couple of HTIB systems and then ended up with a JVC DVD/AVR & Sony speakers combo. Still not totally happy I eventually have the sysem I currently own (you guys know the story) but I know I'm not done yet. Music and movies have never sounded better, and I'm pretty content, so what's that voice doing in the back of my head still?

  15. #15
    Forum Regular pixelthis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by L.J.
    I'd have to give credit to my mother who always had music playing when I was a kid. Mostly oldies, Motown and stuff like that. As a teen I took my own interest in music and started purchasing lots of cassette tapes. I would spend a few hours once a week at a local music shop digging through used bins.

    I remember buying a portable cassette player that sounded like crap so I took it back and got a more expensive on that sounded like crap but a little better. I would spend hours listening to the radio and flying to it, to hit record, when a song I liked came on. Sometimes I would record music while I was sleeping and filter through the tape the next day to find out who the artists were, so I could pick up their album, hopefully used.

    After I got married and my wife and I moved into our first apartment, one of the first things I wanted to get was a stereo system. So I headed off with a budget of about $400 to the local Sears type store called Wards. Now my parents always owned a all-in-one stereo in a box kinda thing so I had no clue what to look for. The guy at the store showed me a Panasonic Prologic HTIB and told me how it could play music and do surround sound for VHS movies. Surround sound, what the heck is that?

    So I got this thing home, hooked it up, put on Top Gun and was like, WOW! Later on I got a Kenwood cassette and CD player and my music never sounded better. Then a bad thing happened. We went to visit my wife's family in Arizona and her dad had a full HT system, don't remember which speakers he had at the time, but his gear was all Pioneer Elite. He put on Saving Private Ryan and The Matrix DVD's. I realized what I had at home was not a HT system.

    Once we got back home it was straight to CC. To make a long story short, I went through a couple of HTIB systems and then ended up with a JVC DVD/AVR & Sony speakers combo. Still not totally happy I eventually have the sysem I currently own (you guys know the story) but I know I'm not done yet. Music and movies have never sounded better, and I'm pretty content, so what's that voice doing in the back of my head still?
    STILL NOT DONE YET.
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  16. #16
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    Hmmm....

    I guess I'd have to credit my parents. My dad was a jazz pianist and my mother was into gospel. I didn't much care for either, although I did love a record my dad had... Dave Brubeck Quartet "Gone With The Wind" which was "regular" tunes I knew played bebop style. To this day, that record slays me. Joe Morello's drumming made me want to become a drummer. Now that I think of it, many of the tunes could be considered gospel so perhaps my mother had just as much to do with my love of that record.

    This was in the early-mid 1960's and I gravitated from Little Wonders records to rock and roll. Electric guitars ruled the day. Then I really listened to the sound of an acoustic guitar... John Sebastian playing "You're a big boy now". Simple playing but the sound just killed me. It made me want to pick up the guitar and my (non-human) soulmate was born.

    Then came 1974 and there wasn't much good rock to listen to IMHO. I gravitated towards jazz and I suppose my immediate taking to it was a result of hearing my dad play it and listen to it. Later I re-explored rock and several other genres. Music defines me - always has.

    With audio, I got into it simply as a way to better serve the music. It was a conscious decision that started in my own mind. I did not know a single audiophile until I became one. But as predominately a music lover, my passion for audio was far outweighed by music and audio upgrades are extremely infrequent today.
    Form is out. Content makes its own form.
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    The format doesn't matter. The music is all that matters.
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  17. #17
    Class of the clown GMichael's Avatar
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    Once upon a time, back in the 60's, my older sister used to like the Beatles. She had a few 45's and a cheap @$$ record player. She would never let me touch it or any of her records. By the early 70's, I was going to the local reservoir that was about 2 miles up the road. Everyone was going there after school to ice skate. They used to have a crappy PA system that would play an AM radio station each night. 770 I think "the new WABC." I can still remember songs that I heard out on the ice. Seasons in the Sun. I Can See Clearly now. I even remember the name of the DJ, George Michael.
    After my sister got a new radio, I was given her old one by my parents. A hand held 9 volt piece of crap. It had no antenna so I had to shove a coat hanger in it to get it to pick up a great new radio station on FM. WPLJ it was called. It was great. Less talk, more songs. My sister would complain that I had it on too loud so I'd keep it under the covers. Then on my 12th birthday, I was given a new Panasonic, 25 watt, all in one, 8-track player/recorder & receiver and two Pioneer project 100A speakers. I still have the receiver, and it still works. Even the 8-track player/recorder. But the input for the mixing mic is toast. I took care of that when a got my first electric guitar at 15. I had no amp, so guess what I did. Yup, plugged it into the mixing mic input. Just put in a blank 8-track, put it on record and hit the pause button. I could play for hours. I later found out that I could get some great distortion and feedback if I turned the gain on the mixing mic up. That was the end of that input. I managed to buy a Fender Twin Reverb amp from a friend who was moving up to a Marshal. I had another friend who worked at Steinburger and was able to pick up a prototype that never went into production for their building costs.
    Fast forward 20 years to today. I never play anymore. Life has taken me down many alternate roads. I just got back into it when all my speakers were destroyed in a flood. I had to build new ones. Then I had to build two more cause the first two came out so good. Then I needed a new receiver to push them with. Then I needed store built speakers for the new receiver. Now the DIY speakers are in the basement with the old receiver. Together again.
    WARNING! - The Surgeon General has determined that, time spent listening to music is not deducted from one's lifespan.

  18. #18
    Forum Regular jim goulding's Avatar
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    My mother's best friend and our neighbor when I was 10. A true bohemian. Her stereo console was on during most waking hours playing grand opera. "The Ole Tiger", an R&B DJ on WRR FM on "Cat's Caravan" on Saturday night in Dallas a little later and last but not least, my first roomate when I was in the military. I was a 17 year old from Texas and this was before intergration anywhere else. To my surprise, this black man had finer sensibilities than anyone I had ever met up to that time and he wasn't but about 20 himself. He turned be on to jazz. More than that, he mentored me in a lot of ways socially.

    Hi fi was a natural development to my love of music.

  19. #19
    I took a headstart... basite's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by basite
    my dad...

    thanks dad

    he gave me his advents, yeah, that gets things started you know. And look where I am now, one year later, started with a single set of advents & a 1980 Kenwood receiver, and now I have stacked advents & a Mcintosh integrated & a good luxman tt & a pretty good cd player

    and we ain't finished yet
    Life is music!

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    I'm a happy 20 year old...

  20. #20
    Forum Regular pixelthis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by basite
    thanks dad

    he gave me his advents, yeah, that gets things started you know. And look where I am now, one year later, started with a single set of advents & a 1980 Kenwood receiver, and now I have stacked advents & a Mcintosh integrated & a good luxman tt & a pretty good cd player

    and we ain't finished yet
    I have always loved mcintosh.
    Where do you live? And when do you go to work?
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  21. #21
    Class of the clown GMichael's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pixelthis
    I have always loved mcintosh.
    Where do you live? And when do you go to work?
    Might be a long swim.
    Bring your shark suite.
    WARNING! - The Surgeon General has determined that, time spent listening to music is not deducted from one's lifespan.

  22. #22
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    These are some great stories. I got my start with my grandfather who was into the Cb's and old time radios. I branched out from there.

  23. #23
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    Definitely my dad...he used to let me play all of my records on his stereo after i learned how to use it.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by dingus
    for me, it was my older brother who used his paper route to finance a decent (for the day) mid-fi stereo. he also bought albums on a regular basis. since i had never had to put any effort into good sound and music, i pretty much took the enjoyment of music for granted, even after buying my very own stereo for the first time.

    one day my roommate brought home a new album called "True Colours" by Split Enz. never heard of the group or album before. it was cool right out of the sleeve because the vinyl was laser etched in all these neat geometric patterns, even cooler was how it sounded. i had always enjoyed listening to music, and i liked having my own system, but until this album i had never heard music that really grabbed me an held my attention. for the first time i found myself listening critically, discovering nuance and subtlety, gaining an appreciation for musical skill, talent and most of all, creativity. i havent taken my gear or music for granted since.
    Are you sure we aren't related? ;-) Similar tastes in music and an appreciation brought on by an older brother. It was my 5 year older brother who had a major influence in my love of music too, except he was not so much into critical listening at that time like I was, although he is into critical appreciation more so now.

    Again you surprise me with your appreciation of Split Enz's "True Colours" album as I would have thought that they were relatively unheard of in the States/Canada. Anyway, it's good to know that they have some appreciation over there. It is a very good album.

  25. #25
    stuck on vintage dingus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lance B
    ... you surprise me with your appreciation of Split Enz's "True Colours" album as I would have thought that they were relatively unheard of in the States ....
    as far as i know they were, i just got lucky. though "True Colours" was my introduction to Split Enz, it is "Time and Tide" that is their masterpiece. i have followed Neil Finn's career ever since and am delighted by the reformation of Crowed House.
    AR MGC-1, AR C225 PS, M&K V-1B, Pioneer VSX 47TX, Oppo BDP-83, Squeezebox v3, Vortexbox Appliance.

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