• 03-14-2004, 03:18 PM
    Weister42
    Using UPS as a surge protector
    I was looking for a power backup supply for my new computer today, and I had a thought of usiung one of these for my home theater. Since these uninterruptable power supply are designed to protect delicate computer equipment and stablize AC power, won't these be a better idea than normal surge protectors?
  • 03-14-2004, 10:44 PM
    uncooked
    well yes they'll work......... but it is designed to filter out different power distortion then what the monster bars do. i was looking into that as well becuase they were like 30 bucks cheaper then the monsters. but i did research and went with the monster
  • 03-16-2004, 07:12 AM
    russkon
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Weister42
    I was looking for a power backup supply for my new computer today, and I had a thought of usiung one of these for my home theater. Since these uninterruptable power supply are designed to protect delicate computer equipment and stablize AC power, won't these be a better idea than normal surge protectors?

    ups units that are designed for computer use are generally not recommended for audio/video use..... the better surge protectors/power conditioners offer some sort of EMI/RF filtering.... that doesn't happen in a ups....

    additionally.... "delicate" computer equipment is much more tolerant of dirty ac power than audio/video equipment....

    and finally.... to get a ups system that will handle the typical power requirements of a home theatre, you will probably need to spend close to $1,000.....
  • 03-16-2004, 10:19 AM
    brigrizzme
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by russkon
    ups units that are designed for computer use are generally not recommended for audio/video use..... the better surge protectors/power conditioners offer some sort of EMI/RF filtering.... that doesn't happen in a ups....

    additionally.... "delicate" computer equipment is much more tolerant of dirty ac power than audio/video equipment....

    and finally.... to get a ups system that will handle the typical power requirements of a home theatre, you will probably need to spend close to $1,000.....

    I used one in my 2-channel set-up for about 30 minutes. My wife asked me if the speakers were blown. Yes it DOES filter.
  • 03-16-2004, 10:29 AM
    russkon
    different issues
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by brigrizzme
    I used one in my 2-channel set-up for about 30 minutes. My wife asked me if the speakers were blown. Yes it DOES filter.

    i think we are talking about different things.....

    the "filtering" i was referring to is the RF/EMI filtering that actually lowers the noise floor....

    your comment leads me to believe it was an underpowered ups that limited to the current to your amplifier section..... more of a current limiting issue.....

    as i mentioned....high power ups units that can handle audio/video systems are rather expensive and provide questionable results

    the following ups from tripplite has been used by others in audio/video systems (i've read in other forums)....but it does sell for about $930 online!

    http://tripplite.com/products/produc...productID=2475



    best wishes!
  • 03-16-2004, 11:17 AM
    skeptic
    UPSs are always used today on professional audio equipment racks. The trick it to buy only a high quality unit. If you do, it will provide excellent isolaton of emi/rfi noise as well as many other benefits including excellent protection from spikes and surges. Look for an on line unit that has low (less than 5%) harmonic distortion. Inexpensive units suitable for use with computers may not be suitable for use with high quality audio equipment. It is best to shop for this type of equipment at a large electrical supply house, not a store that caters to audio equipment. They have knowledgeable experts who can give you the information and advice you need abut UPSs to make an intelligent selection from companies like Powerware (Exide), MGE, Liebert, Sola, and others. Don't be surprised if this costs you about $1000.
  • 03-23-2004, 02:54 PM
    SundanceBill
    This is my first post, however, skeptic is exactly right. Check out Powerware (www.powerware.com) for their Model 9120 Online UPS at a cost of $630 for a 700VA to $1100 for a 1500VA UPS. Only "Online" technology will eliminate RFI/EMI noise and harmonic distortion. Hope that helps.