spacing components

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  • 04-06-2008, 04:00 PM
    Bigmoney
    spacing components
    Due to rack space I have my cdp stacked ontop of my preamp. Is this okay. How far do you all typically try to space your components. Would I be better off stacking the pre on the amp or cdp on amp. I figured that wouldnt be a good idea in order to let my amp breathe. What is the beenfit of spacing components.
  • 04-06-2008, 04:13 PM
    Ajani
    Don't stack the CD player on the Amp, leave it on the Pre-amp. Two reasons for spacing components:

    1) To avoid overheating - so never place any component on top of the vents of another component (especially an amp or integrated amp).

    2) Vibration - I'd worry less about this than overheating.
  • 04-06-2008, 04:15 PM
    JohnMichael
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Ajani
    Don't stack the CD player on the Amp, leave it on the Pre-amp. Two reasons for spacing components:

    1) To avoid overheating - so never place any component on top of the vents of another component (especially an amp or integrated amp).

    2) Vibration - I'd worry less about this than overheating.




    Yes, what Ajani said.
  • 04-06-2008, 05:10 PM
    Bigmoney
    Should I worry about interference between components.
  • 04-06-2008, 05:31 PM
    aevans
    Preamp should usually be away from amps and power supplys, I've seen people do some strange stuff with positioning. but the general rule is if you can't hear any problems and nothing is overheating then everything is good.
  • 04-06-2008, 05:31 PM
    JohnMichael
    I would never stack anything on a power amp due to the large transformer used. My Rotel phono preamp said it should not be stacked on top of another component which also contained a torroidal transformer. I stack my phono preamps on top of cd players without any problems. I do not think stacking cdp's or phono preamps on preamps would be a problem. Of course if you bring tubes into the mix all bets are off. I have no experience with tubes.
  • 04-06-2008, 07:24 PM
    OzzieAudiophile
    Guys, there is a very good reason why in the instruction manuals they have
    recommendations as to the minimum amount of inches the units need, wide, high, and
    deep, when you put it in your rack/cabinet etc.

    60% of returns are due to overheating and that is because they do not read the
    instruction manual, sorry if I offended anyone reading this, but I have no sympathy for ppl
    that lack common sense. Not all instruction manuals are a waste of time to read haha.

    One would believe that it makes sense you would not to leave at least "some" space
    for a unit for ventilation IF there are holes on the top. Space of the unit's feet when placed
    above another unit, is unlikely to be sufficient, as most are just 1 inch or less high.

    Power Amps, and top end receivers are power hungry beasts, that provide a lot of power.
    Hence they will give out a lot of power. The power amps ideally should be the topmost
    unit, with plenty of space for it to breathe in every direction.

    However the higher end McIntosh amps for example have features to prevent itself
    from overheating easily. It "claims" to remain at a good non-heated temperature.

    If you find you cannot provide the recommended space for each component, no matter
    how you arrange which component goes on top of another, then you may have to
    reconsider getting a replacement cabinet, or stacker.

    The more expensive the unit, the more priority you may need to give to preventing
    overheating.

    Don't forget the option of adding a cooling system. That may help keep the operating
    temperature down. I mean they have some very effective and efficient cooling systems
    for PCs.

    Overheating on components is an "Expensive" repair, because there's a chance of
    melted circuitary.

    One time I had a bar of chocolate on the top of my PC tower case. It melted the day
    after, and I was wondering how could it do that ? I found out the surface on the top was
    hot, then I looked at the back where the fan was. The fan wasn't rotating because there
    was a small piece of paper that fell into the hole and blocked the propellors.

    I am not saying that is likely to happen for your components, but just make sure there's
    nothing near the holes in the back, that shouldn't be there. I have my components near
    a window, and lots of things fall down in the back. I'm saying if you have to rewire, you
    might as well check everything whilst you're there. Can't do any harm.

    It also helps if you have more space between each component anyway, as it makes it
    easier to wipe dust off the surfaces.

    If anyone found the following tips useful, the postitive feeback would be welcome of
    course :)