• 06-27-2007, 04:14 AM
    ChrisP9
    Question on 'grounding' my receiver.
    I have a question on the need to provide a ground for each unit in my rig.

    Power for both my receiver, Pioneer TX-540, and my turntable, Pioneer PL-510A, comes from the 'Switched' and 'Unswitched' power sources on the back of my amp, a Marantz 1070. Two pin power sources, no ground. The turntable has a ground lead integral to the RCA leads and that hooks up to the ground on the amp. The receiver has no provision for a ground other than the 75ohm antenna connection.

    Is this normal with receivers? would there be any benefit running a ground lead from the receiver case to the ground on the amp? Or is it a case of 'if it ain't broken don't fix it'?

    Thanks
    Chris
  • 06-27-2007, 08:36 AM
    Rock789
    some metal enclosed devices have a place for a ground attachment...
    perhaps there is a ground terminal or screw on these devices?
    This ground is to keep the metal enclosure at ground potential... which, in the event of an internal failure and a hot wire hits the metal enclosure, a fuse would open in the short rather than the metal enclosure floating at whatever voltage waiting to shock someone...

    Some devices now days, rather than grounding the metal enclosure, keep all electrical devices completely insulated from the metal enclosure... this way in the event a hot wire comes loose inside, it will not hit the metal case...

    if you have no ground terminal or screw on the back, and you are not having ground loop issues, you are probably safe...
  • 06-27-2007, 10:12 AM
    Robert-The-Rambler
    The Ground Can Be Very Useful
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by ChrisP9
    I have a question on the need to provide a ground for each unit in my rig.

    Power for both my receiver, Pioneer TX-540, and my turntable, Pioneer PL-510A, comes from the 'Switched' and 'Unswitched' power sources on the back of my amp, a Marantz 1070. Two pin power sources, no ground. The turntable has a ground lead integral to the RCA leads and that hooks up to the ground on the amp. The receiver has no provision for a ground other than the 75ohm antenna connection.

    Is this normal with receivers? would there be any benefit running a ground lead from the receiver case to the ground on the amp? Or is it a case of 'if it ain't broken don't fix it'?

    Thanks
    Chris

    I was getting noise in the audio signal from my Kenwood VR-7070 that is running pre-outs to several Gemini DJ amps even though I had ground loop isolators for every channel in a 5.1 setup. The receiver was the culprit and connecting a simple speaker wire from the ground on the reciever to a ground terminal on one of the amps killed the noise entirely. So if you hear noise there might be a benefit but if it aint broke don't fix it. If its already working right it won't help it work any better.

    If there is no actual gound for the receiver then you should not have a problem. In my experience receivers without a ground terminal tend not to have ground problems at all.
  • 06-27-2007, 06:57 PM
    ChrisP9
    Thanks guys!, I'll leave it as it is.