playing MP3s

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  • 11-10-2006, 05:56 AM
    Jibboom
    playing MP3s
    Is there such a thing as a receiver that accepts an mp3 player straight into it? Sort of like "line in". And if so can you get high quality sound that way? I'd really like a setup so that any guest could bring a player and hook it up. Thanks in advance for any help.
  • 11-10-2006, 06:59 AM
    markw
    Not a problem. You're making more of a issue of this than it warrants
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Jibboom
    Is there such a thing as a receiver that accepts an mp3 player straight into it? Sort of like "line in". And if so can you get high quality sound that way? I'd really like a setup so that any guest could bring a player and hook it up. Thanks in advance for any help.

    Just get yourself something like this:

    http://www.cablestogo.com/product.as...2009&sku=03180

    Plug the two RCA plugs into any "line level" input on the back of your receiver, and the stick mini plug into any device that has a headphone output. They are quite common and you should be able to procure one locally and inexpensively. I've even seen 'em in dollar stores.

    It'll provide at least as "high quality" of a sound as the portble device can provide.
  • 11-10-2006, 07:59 AM
    Dusty Chalk
    How about this one?
  • 11-10-2006, 08:21 AM
    elapsed
    With new Denon receivers you can purchase an optional iDock, take a look at the Denon AVR-1507 through AVR-2807.

    Also, with new Yamaha receivers you can purchase an optional YDS-10 dock, take a look at the Yamaha RX-V559 through RX-V2700, and HTR-5950 through HTR-6090.

    Or you can purchase a $5 RCA cable as per Mark's post, and plug directly into your receiver.
  • 11-10-2006, 09:10 AM
    Mike Anderson
    You can connect your player to just about anything that has an input of some sort. If your receiver has stereo RCA inputs (e.g. "AUX", "TAPE") or a 1/8" miniplug input, you just need the right cable to connect to it.

    If you have an iPod, there's a nice quality cord that takes the (higher quality, line level) signal from the bottom of the iPod, and has stereo male RCA connections on the other end:

    http://playlistmag.com/products/complete/138-detail.php

    I also have a cord with 1/8" male stereo mini-plugs on both ends (goes from the headphone output to the input of whatever device you like):

    http://www.radioshack.com/product/in...entPage=search
  • 11-10-2006, 10:03 AM
    JoeE SP9
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Jibboom
    Is there such a thing as a receiver that accepts an mp3 player straight into it? Sort of like "line in". And if so can you get high quality sound that way? I'd really like a setup so that any guest could bring a player and hook it up. Thanks in advance for any help.

    MP3 sound is not high quality!:incazzato: Never was, never will be.:ihih:
  • 11-10-2006, 10:09 AM
    Dusty Chalk
    Depends. If you compress it too much, yes, it will sound bad. But if you only compress it a little, it'll sound just fine.
  • 11-10-2006, 10:30 AM
    markw
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Dusty Chalk
    How about this one?

    Not all MP3 players are Ipods. The link cable I suggest will accomodate anything with a headphone jack, including my Sansa.
  • 11-10-2006, 10:36 AM
    Dusty Chalk
    Yes, the link cable is certainly a more universal solution. Just leave it plugged into the aux ins and draped over the front, and you're golden.
  • 11-10-2006, 11:00 AM
    basite
    i use a such a cable (a bandridge cable, nothing too fancy, just better then standard) to connect my pc to my amp, it's also easy when somebody visits you and brings a laptop with him or something like that, cuz i refuse to listen to the standard laptop speakers.
  • 11-10-2006, 11:15 AM
    Mike Anderson
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by JoeE SP9
    MP3 sound is not high quality!:incazzato: Never was, never will be.:ihih:

    I'd challenge anyone to distinguish between a MP3 compressed at 320k from an uncompressed WAV. Very, very little difference if any,

    Anyone who wants to try a blind test is welcomed to come to my place and try one.
  • 11-10-2006, 11:20 AM
    markw
    Actually, the 1/8" stereo mini plug is becoming a standard of sorts.
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Dusty Chalk
    Yes, the link cable is certainly a more universal solution. Just leave it plugged into the aux ins and draped over the front, and you're golden.

    More and more car radios are popping up with these. I just got a Sony head unit (GT 300) specifically for that purpose. The '07 Mazda's all come with these, I'm told that Nissan has 'em too, the 07 Hyundai Elantras offer it as an option, and I understand many others are as well.

    It's about fargin' time, IMNSHO.
  • 11-10-2006, 12:32 PM
    JoeE SP9
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Mike Anderson
    I'd challenge anyone to distinguish between a MP3 compressed at 320k from an uncompressed WAV. Very, very little difference if any,

    Anyone who wants to try a blind test is welcomed to come to my place and try one.

    On my system at 256K the difference is so obvious I gave up the effort. I haven't tried 320K. Could the system used have anything to do with the audibility of compression? My system is quite revealing.:ihih:
  • 11-10-2006, 01:18 PM
    jrhymeammo
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Mike Anderson
    I'd challenge anyone to distinguish between a MP3 compressed at 320k from an uncompressed WAV. Very, very little difference if any,

    Anyone who wants to try a blind test is welcomed to come to my place and try one.

    We should do that via mail. Make 5 tracks at 64, 128, 256, 320, and Lossless on CD-Rs, and submit answers to the sender with actual answers. I'll fund $20 to whoever wants to be in charge. I guess participants gotta pay for the shipping though. $1? You can even do it with different cables too. See if we can identify differences. No one will ever do it though.....


    -JRA
  • 11-10-2006, 01:33 PM
    JoeE SP9
    Going through that process is a waste of time for me. I don't have an ipod or any kind of dedicated mp3 player. I don't store my CD's on my HDD's and am not interested in doing so. The whole idea of compressing CD's was something I tried and rejected. Why throw out the baby with the bath water? I guess I'm just old fashioned when it comes to playing music.:cool:
  • 11-10-2006, 01:45 PM
    jrhymeammo
    Com'on Joe, take one for the team:cornut:
  • 11-10-2006, 02:06 PM
    Mike Anderson
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by JoeE SP9
    Going through that process is a waste of time for me. I don't have an ipod or any kind of dedicated mp3 player. I don't store my CD's on my HDD's and am not interested in doing so. The whole idea of compressing CD's was something I tried and rejected. Why throw out the baby with the bath water? I guess I'm just old fashioned when it comes to playing music.:cool:

    There are many reasons to store your music on your computer.

    First of all, you can get about 50% compression through a completely lossless format like FLAC, so sound quality isn't an issue. In fact you can get sound superior to a CD player at a lower cost by using a high quality DAC.

    More importantly, having your music on your computer gives you the ability to manage and manipulate it effortlessly. I handle a new CD exactly *once* -- when I put it in the computer for ripping. After that, I never touch it again unless I want to.

    My entire collection is on a hard drive, instantly accessible. I can pick one song out of thousands in about five seconds, without even getting out of my chair. I can make playlists, play songs at random, burn mixed CDs for friends or the car, you name it.

    Then, put the music on an iPod, and my entire collection is completely portable. Take it on a trip, to the gym, a friend's house, wherever I like.

    Anybody who doesn't jump on this is really missing out on a lot.