The passage of time...

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  • 02-09-2012, 06:08 AM
    RGA
    1 Attachment(s)
    The passage of time...
    yes indeed
  • 02-09-2012, 06:57 AM
    Feanor
    Q: What is the target audience? With an ageing population, continually target youth and adolescents need to questioned.

    If they don't like Bieber, et al., middle-age parents should stop enabling their kids by taking away their media-capable toys.

    ... Oh well, just a thought. :o
  • 02-09-2012, 08:18 AM
    LeRoy
    I was at a friends house last night listening to Rhianna for the first time. I only know of her name because her pics and name make the Yahoo front page so often. So, my buddy and I are listening to her and the only recurring thought in my mind is this- I don't like her music but she sure is hot and beautiful that I don't care that her music is not to my liking. I think I love her now.
  • 02-09-2012, 08:46 AM
    frenchmon
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by LeRoy View Post
    I was at a friends house last night listening to Rhianna for the first time. I only know of her name because her pics and name make the Yahoo front page so often. So, my buddy and I are listening to her and the only recurring thought in my mind is this- I don't like her music but she sure is hot and beautiful that I don't care that her music is not to my liking. I think I love her now.


    LoL! well All I can say...I saw her last year and fell inlove with her then....but I can't tell you what she sings. I just don't know how her boy friend Chris punched her in the eye and beat her up. That guy is a fool...and so am I...im 50 and she is like what 24!
  • 02-09-2012, 11:04 AM
    LeRoy
    Ya, in my minds eye
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by frenchmon View Post
    LoL! l and she is like what 24!

    She will always be 24 or whatever. I am 52 and if she were 42 I would still love her :)
  • 02-09-2012, 05:32 PM
    mlsstl
    Back to the premise of the original graphic, we old folks need to be careful about getting on our high horses. There was some pretty silly stuff in the old days.

    "Mairzy doats and dozy doats and liddle lamzy divey" anyone? (from 1943.)
  • 02-09-2012, 06:19 PM
    Luvin Da Blues
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by mlsstl View Post
    Back to the premise of the original graphic, we old folks need to be careful about getting on our high horses. There was some pretty silly stuff in the old days.

    "Mairzy doats and dozy doats and liddle lamzy divey" anyone? (from 1943.)

    But the difference is that they old stuff was meant to be silly.
  • 02-09-2012, 07:16 PM
    mlsstl
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Luvin Da Blues View Post
    But the difference is that they old stuff was meant to be silly.

    And Justin Bieber's material is meant to appeal to his audience of tweens.

    Just like the Beatles did when "She loves you, yeah yeah yeah" came out almost 50 years ago. It was a great hit, but one can hardly claim it represents the high point of sophistication in the history of song lyrics.

    Pretty easy for us to forget what most adults of that era thought of teen pop music when we were teenagers.

    Remember the young J.S. Bach almost got fired from his first job as a church organist in the early 18th century because his unconventional playing was distracting the congregation.

    It's a pretty universal rule that the majority of adults of any generation are going to think a lot of the music popular with young people isn't as good as the stuff they liked in their day.
  • 02-09-2012, 08:09 PM
    LeRoy
    Agree with you
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by mlsstl View Post
    And Justin Bieber's material is meant to appeal to his audience of tweens.

    Just like the Beatles did when "She loves you, yeah yeah yeah" came out almost 50 years ago. It was a great hit, but one can hardly claim it represents the high point of sophistication in the history of song lyrics.

    Pretty easy for us to forget what most adults of that era thought of teen pop music when we were teenagers.

    Remember the young J.S. Bach almost got fired from his first job as a church organist in the early 18th century because his unconventional playing was distracting the congregation.

    It's a pretty universal rule that the majority of adults of any generation are going to think a lot of the music popular with young people isn't as good as the stuff they liked in their day.

    J.B. has not yet earned the wrinkles of Sinatra's time. He may not want to either...it was a different time.
  • 02-10-2012, 04:49 AM
    Luvin Da Blues
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by mlsstl View Post
    And Justin Bieber's material is meant to appeal to his audience of tweens. Not to get pissy here but that's the point of this thread....expectations and delivery HAS been going down hill.

    Just like the Beatles did when "She loves you, yeah yeah yeah" came out almost 50 years ago. It was a great hit, but one can hardly claim it represents the high point of sophistication in the history of song lyrics. Their first hit...Look what they did after. I just don't see JB doing anything even remotely close.

    Pretty easy for us to forget what most adults of that era thought of teen pop music when we were teenagers. True... I'm not disputing the fact that our generation had some pretty awefull tunes also but the good far out weighed the bad.....not so much today IMO

    Remember the young J.S. Bach almost got fired from his first job as a church organist in the early 18th century because his unconventional playing was distracting the congregation.

    It's a pretty universal rule that the majority of adults of any generation are going to think a lot of the music popular with young people isn't as good as the stuff they liked in their day. I agree but it doesn't change the fact that MOST of the new music is CRAP!!! LOL

    The lyrics without the Yeah Yeahs and chorus ...not great but not terrible either......

    You think you lost your love,
    Well, I saw her yesterday.
    It's you she's thinking of
    And she told me what to say.

    She said you hurt her so
    She almost lost her mind.
    But now she said she knows
    You're not the hurting kind.

    You know it's up to you,
    I think it's only fair,
    Pride can hurt you, too,
    Apologize to her
  • 02-10-2012, 05:01 AM
    mlsstl
    I'm not Bieber fan, and have no clue as to what he will do in the future. Right now, he's almost certainly singing only the material picked by his producer. I imagine things were pretty much the same for Sinatra in 1935 when he was with the Hoboken Four.

    However, the original graphic was rather shallow and glib. Far too easy to take things like that as some type of serious commentary, especially when it reinforces whatever bias we have.
  • 02-10-2012, 05:24 AM
    noddin0ff
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Luvin Da Blues View Post
    But the difference is that they old stuff was meant to be silly.

    Tutti frutti, oh, rootie
    Tutti fruitti, whoo!
    Tutti fruitti, ah, oh, rootie
    Tutti fruitti, oh, rootie

    A whop bop a-loo
    Whop A whop Bam
    Ooooh
  • 02-10-2012, 05:35 AM
    Feanor
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by mlsstl View Post
    ...
    Remember the young J.S. Bach almost got fired from his first job as a church organist in the early 18th century because his unconventional playing was distracting the congregation.
    ...

    I don't recall the story specifically, but chances are JS's "unconventional" playing was probably just far superior playing to what the congregations was used too. He eventually became a famous organist.

    Bach was considered a very conservative, stodgy composer in his own day. He was never considered trite or silly.
  • 02-10-2012, 09:19 AM
    mlsstl
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Feanor View Post
    I don't recall the story specifically, but chances are JS's "unconventional" playing was probably just far superior playing to what the congregations was used too. He eventually became a famous organist.

    Bach was considered a very conservative, stodgy composer in his own day. He was never considered trite or silly.

    That's one of the main points - "superior playing" or not, it was not what the congregation and church elders wanted him to do. They wanted the music played in the style they were used to.

    Don't get caught up in the limitation of "trite or silly" as that is only one way in which the established types dismiss newcomers.

    Whether music, art, fashion, design or whatever, it's really not hard to find example after example of a young talent who was not recognized early on, only to later be acknowledged as great.
  • 02-10-2012, 09:22 AM
    Ajani
    As funny as I found the image, I think some of the persons in this thread are correct: Older generations always end up looking down on the music and lifestyle of younger ones. Such is life. Eventually we all lose touch of what is current and mainstream. We long for the days of the music we grew up with. We gloss over times that weren't all that great, but in the rear view mirror look perfect.

    There has always been popular music with catchy beats and weak lyrics. Justin Beiber is a child and his music is aimed at such an audience. We have no way of knowing what he may sing when he has matured as an artist (if he matures).

    Take George Michael for example; who would have thought a man who sang "wake me up before you go go" would go on to sing some of the poetry he did later on his career? If you're not familiar with George's work, I'd suggest listening to "Praying for time".
  • 02-10-2012, 11:10 AM
    JoeE SP9
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by mlsstl View Post
    Back to the premise of the original graphic, we old folks need to be careful about getting on our high horses. There was some pretty silly stuff in the old days.

    "Mairzy doats and dozy doats and liddle lamzy divey" anyone? (from 1943.)

    Mare's eat Oats and Doe's eat Oats
    And little Lamb's eat Ivy
    A Kidd'll eat Ivy too wouldn't you?
  • 02-10-2012, 02:09 PM
    mlsstl
    RE: Mairzy Doats - thanks, Joe for posting the bridge of the song. Wikipedia has an interesting summary of the song's history.
  • 02-10-2012, 03:35 PM
    E-Stat
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by LeRoy View Post
    I was at a friends house last night listening to Rhianna for the first time.

    For the past three years, I've taken the vintage garage system over to my neighbor's tennis court for their daughter's Halloween parties. What is funny is that her Mom and one of her friends obsessed more about putting together the musical content than the daughter. I had them fill a memory stick with their selections and created a new library for the Squeezebox.

    Most of that music didn't do much for this mid fifties guy, but I confess that I enjoyed some Rhianna, Katy Perry, KeSha and Daughtry. Rhianna actually has a powerful voice (although trashy at times) where Katy just makes some fun music. Perry's vocal power is as compressed as the recordings. Anyway, I ended up buying two of Rhianna's CDs one of Katy's and one of KeSha's.

    I enjoy a number of Rhianna's songs (most of which don't get airplay or videos), but two come to mind: Disturbia and Hard (Feat).. Hard has some phenomenal first octave bass that adds background foundational weight to the music like a 32 foot organ stop. No punch. You simply sense the pressure in the background. Very tasty. It's also the kind of bass where the stats provide more texture to the synth than the woofer based speakers. The song is nice although I could do without the rap in the middle of it altogether. You can sample them at Youtube.

    Most of her songs are meant to crank. While I usually listen to the double Advents at about the four watt level, sometimes I like nothing more than to run the Stasis wide open at 400 watts with those two songs. You can hear it at some distance outside my garage at that power level. ;)