• 12-25-2007, 03:10 PM
    Mr Peabody
    Music For Pleasure is still here. They recently moved about a block down into a new building. They have several rooms and they set them up like living rooms and put different systems in each one. I really don't think any of the new rooms sound as good as the one main room in the old building though. The wooden flooring sometimes resonated on large systems but it was a large room with a higher ceiling and some of the big Dyn's really shined in there.

    Snodog I don't remember if I posted this here already or not but www.crutchfield.com has several receivers to compare features and price, they have "how to" articles that are pretty good for basic information. As far as hook up you only have your owners manual and us. Crutchfield usually sends out some basic setup guides too if you purchase from them and also offer lifetime tech (set up) support as long as you own the piece. This may be something to think about. Keep in mind the "auto speaker set up" feature when looking at receivers.

    If you did consider separates which would go beyond your budget, look at the NAD T175. This is a totally up to date preamp processor, it alone will set you back about $1,800.00 if msrp of $1,999.00. This unit has a tuner but you will need a separate multichannel amp. A multichannel amp is usually a fairly safe item to buy used from Audiogon. Or, you could buy the cheap power amp from Outlaw to pair with the more updated T175.
  • 12-25-2007, 03:31 PM
    melvin walker
    The difference between high end 35 years ago and today is cost. Before 1970 one could buy a complete hi-end audio system for about $1000. HI-FI Stereo Review tested systems in that price range , it included Marantz , McIntosh , Fisher , Scott , and Harman-Kardon Citation amps and pre-amp all separates , Speakers were AR , Bozak , Altec Lansing , KLH , Electro-Voice speakers , Empire , Thorens , Rek-O- Kut , Fairchild , and Garrad manual TT with arms and cartridges. Any combination for around $1000.

    The same difference is in cars , example a 1970 Porsche 911E sold for $ 6000 , a Jaguar
    XKE roaster $6000 , Mercedes SL $7000 and a Chevrolet Corvette around $6000.
    In both high end cars and audio the average American could afford these cars and audio gear. Not today !

    What we have done is lowered our expectations because of cost. The highest priced speaker in 1970 was the JBL Paragon $2600.
    A Rolex Datejust sold for $400 in 1970 today the same watch is over $6000.
    Young people today can generally only dream of high-end audio and cars. I was 24 when I bought my first high end audio system. I spent about $1200 it was a blast.
    Today a similar high end system would cost over $10,000.
    How times have changed.
  • 12-25-2007, 07:04 PM
    Mr Peabody
    I think $1k was pretty hard to come by in 1970. I wonder with inflation and cost of living if the ratio is all that different compared to today. I believe gas was 35 cents a gallon then.

    I think my Sansui AU-9500 from that era cost around $600.00 ro $700.00 new. I was very impressed at how well it sounded and it could hold it's own today against some pretty expensive units. I also had a Yamaha from that decade that was similar in price that was just shameful in comparison, sound wasn't nearly as good and build quality was not as substantial.

    I didn't know Electro Voice made home speakers. I'd love to hear a pair. Years ago I almost bought a pair of there Pro speakers for home use. They were a 15" 2-way, I think 1503's. They sounded incredible, at least to my ears then. I couldn't get my wife to warm up to the idea of having the carpeted road cabinet look in our living room though. So I opted for the Infinity Kappa 7's which I employee purchased from the factory. When I moved on to another occupation it was hard getting used to paying retail again. EV sure had some great sounding mid/high horns. I'd imagine their home speakers were very good. Speakers from the 70's were quite different from today as well. I remember hearing a pair of Altec that were probably the size of a small chest freezer. Then it was big cabinets and big woofers.
  • 12-25-2007, 07:04 PM
    snodog
    Thanks again Mr P for the info. I think that is well beyond my resources for price but I will keep them in mind and you never know I could sell my artwork for a nice price in the future!

    One thing to keep in mind also Melvin, that was probably also back when cost to manufacture was higher vs lower like today. I am not certain but did companies then ship to china and malaysia and such for dirt cheap labor? Granted, the wages were much lower then as well. Maybe I am wrong but wouldnt it still cost less today to produce a piece of equimpment by sending it overseas? You always hear about the phillipino or whomever making several dollars a week and he could well be assembling Denon receivers that we would be charged $1000 for...
  • 12-25-2007, 07:14 PM
    Rock&Roll Ninja
    Horrible: a Ferrari costs about as much as a small house ($200,000 - 500,000)

    Really horrible: a small house costs $200,000 - 500,000 ( a 1200' starter home shouldn't cost a quarter million dollars).


    back on topic: an AVR must first meet all your hook-up requirements. That McIntosh pre-amp isn't worth much if you can't hook all your gear into it.

    And an audiophile is anyone who can sit still and actively listen to music. Gear is irrelevant, although they tend to upgrade as soon as they hear what they're missing. I was perfectly happy with listening to the symphony on a JVC boombox until I heard the same CD on somebodys "real speakers".

    Really, imagine the millions of Americans who only know audio equipment for what they sell at Wal*Mart (its not like they show TV commercials for Paradigm or B&W). Most people just don't know that can or should buy speakers that don't come permenantly attached to a CD player/FM radio.
  • 12-25-2007, 09:01 PM
    melvin walker
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Mr Peabody
    I think $1k was pretty hard to come by in 1970. I wonder with inflation and cost of living if the ratio is all that different compared to today. I believe gas was 35 cents a gallon then.

    I think my Sansui AU-9500 from that era cost around $600.00 ro $700.00 new. I was very impressed at how well it sounded and it could hold it's own today against some pretty expensive units. I also had a Yamaha from that decade that was similar in price that was just shameful in comparison, sound wasn't nearly as good and build quality was not as substantial.

    I didn't know Electro Voice made home speakers. I'd love to hear a pair. Years ago I almost bought a pair of there Pro speakers for home use. They were a 15" 2-way, I think 1503's. They sounded incredible, at least to my ears then. I couldn't get my wife to warm up to the idea of having the carpeted road cabinet look in our living room though. So I opted for the Infinity Kappa 7's which I employee purchased from the factory. When I moved on to another occupation it was hard getting used to paying retail again. EV sure had some great sounding mid/high horns. I'd imagine their home speakers were very good. Speakers from the 70's were quite different from today as well. I remember hearing a pair of Altec that were probably the size of a small chest freezer. Then it was big cabinets and big woofers.

    Electro-Voice made some of the finest speakers of that era. One the Electro-Voice Patrician was a 4 way speaker system using a 30inch woofer. The Earlier Patricians used a front loaded horn. These speakers today are very expensive.

    $1000 was not that hard to come by in 1970. Killer inflation came about doing the Carter presidency. in the late 70's. Speakers were different in the post 70's due to the change in musical taste. Rock played a major role in the decline of high end audio speakers.
  • 12-26-2007, 03:50 AM
    melvin walker
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by snodog
    Thanks again Mr P for the info. I think that is well beyond my resources for price but I will keep them in mind and you never know I could sell my artwork for a nice price in the future!

    One thing to keep in mind also Melvin, that was probably also back when cost to manufacture was higher vs lower like today. I am not certain but did companies then ship to china and malaysia and such for dirt cheap labor? Granted, the wages were much lower then as well. Maybe I am wrong but wouldnt it still cost less today to produce a piece of equimpment by sending it overseas? You always hear about the phillipino or whomever making several dollars a week and he could well be assembling Denon receivers that we would be charged $1000 for...

    The major difference was inflation. Salaries did not keep up with inflation. Yes it does cost more to produce a product in America than in China , with labor the main reason.
    Also the value of the dollar which as had its up and downs , one of the main reasons the cost of European goods are so expensive.

    All of these problems with awareness happen after 1970. Audio was no different , prices of audio equipment sky rocketed upwards after 1970. Audio also suffered with the popularity
    of video beginning in the 90's. There are other reasons to many to list here.
    The mid range audio equipment is much better today than pre 1970's. But than so is the high end. Example a Porsche Carrera is a better car today than pre 1970's but it cost ten times more ! So does a McIntosh pre amp.
  • 12-26-2007, 04:08 AM
    basite
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by melvin walker
    The difference between high end 35 years ago and today is cost. Before 1970 one could buy a complete hi-end audio system for about $1000. HI-FI Stereo Review tested systems in that price range , it included Marantz , McIntosh , Fisher , Scott , and Harman-Kardon Citation amps and pre-amp all separates , Speakers were AR , Bozak , Altec Lansing , KLH , Electro-Voice speakers , Empire , Thorens , Rek-O- Kut , Fairchild , and Garrad manual TT with arms and cartridges. Any combination for around $1000.

    The same difference is in cars , example a 1970 Porsche 911E sold for $ 6000 , a Jaguar
    XKE roaster $6000 , Mercedes SL $7000 and a Chevrolet Corvette around $6000.
    In both high end cars and audio the average American could afford these cars and audio gear. Not today !

    What we have done is lowered our expectations because of cost. The highest priced speaker in 1970 was the JBL Paragon $2600.
    A Rolex Datejust sold for $400 in 1970 today the same watch is over $6000.
    Young people today can generally only dream of high-end audio and cars. I was 24 when I bought my first high end audio system. I spent about $1200 it was a blast.
    Today a similar high end system would cost over $10,000.
    How times have changed.

    these times, everyone could afford a 6k car. because you earn more than you used to earn (because of inflation and stuff)...

    and you forgot that.
    How much did you earn in the 70's? well, whatever it was, it was way less than someone today doing the same job.

    Back then 6k was alot.

    Keep them spinning,
    Bert.
  • 12-26-2007, 06:41 AM
    Mr Peabody
    Melvin your statements on Rock & Roll reminds me of this old guy who used to be my neighbor years ago, we'd be in a conversation about something and he'd blame a change or down turn on the Beatles. "Yeah, that all came about when those Beatles came over here". Or, "if it wasn't for those Beatles". :) He was a good guy, it just tickled me that everything was caused by the Beatles. I'd think that a speaker with a 30" woofer and as sensitive as EV probably was would be a Rock-n-Roller's dream. I think if EV was around today with those speakers Klipsch would be hurting if not out of business. The EV gear I've heard from the Pro side was very superior in sound to what Klipsch offers.

    Some of the States prominent manufacturer's aren't even American anymore. Mac was bought by the company who owns Clarion years ago. I don't know if it's still built here or if that company still has them. Levinson was sold to Harmon. I heard that Klipsch was even sold. I'm sure there are others we can add but I can't think of them right now.

    You are right though that there have been several things to change the market and the way gear is marketed and the impression of consumers. The use of the IC chip was huge. Home Theater definitely changing things forever. For speakers it was probably the gravitation of manufacturers to stop using paper cones in favor of new "space age" materials. I'm not sure why they went from larger woofers to a concensus of some kind of 6 1/2" driver configuration. Some how I doubt if it was do to R&R :) That change took me a long time to convert to. I've been told that 6 1/2 drivers are faster and able to give a better bass response. It wasn't until hearing Dynaudio that I was fully convinced this could happen. When selling a product I guess if you want to stay in business you have to change with the times. You will notice though that most "high end" companies are slow to adopt new technology or features until they are fully proven in the market. Hence, no high end name on the front of a Blu-ray or HD-DVD player yet. Some one asked about the 1.3 HDMI, I'm not sure if that's been added to high end processors yet. When you put out a product costing in the thousands rather than hundreds there isn't room for mistakes if you plan to stay in business long. I'm may be bucking change again but I'm not a big fan of the universal player. This is another trend that caught on big. To my knowledge Krell hasn't offered a dedicated CD player since my 280cd was discontinued.
  • 12-26-2007, 06:46 AM
    E-Stat
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by melvin walker
    Audio was no different , prices of audio equipment sky rocketed upwards after 1970.

    True, but companies like Audio Research and Mark Levinson raised the bar in the quality of the components used (and ultimately, the sound quality). They were among the first to use polyprop caps, glass epoxy boards, etc.

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by melvin walker
    The mid range audio equipment is much better today than pre 1970's. But than so is the high end. Example a Porsche Carrera is a better car today than pre 1970's but it cost ten times more !

    I look at this positive side. Entry level Honda Civics perform more like 60s exotics. Cornering capability in the 0.85 range and 0-60 in 7 second range can easily be found. While it's true there are some astronomically priced audio components, one can get a great sounding two channel system for $1200.

    rw
  • 12-26-2007, 07:09 AM
    frenchmon
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Mr Peabody
    Music For Pleasure is still here. They recently moved about a block down into a new building. They have several rooms and they set them up like living rooms and put different systems in each one. I really don't think any of the new rooms sound as good as the one main room in the old building though. The wooden flooring sometimes resonated on large systems but it was a large room with a higher ceiling and some of the big Dyn's really shined in there.

    I loved Music For Pleasure.

    How about "Hi FI FO FUM" ?

    I remember back in the 80's they had Snell Acustics Speaker and Luxman amps and recievers. Are they still around? IF so do they still have quality geer? Or have they gone the road to home theater?

    frenchmon
  • 12-26-2007, 07:40 AM
    emaidel
    In the 60's (and, likely during other decades) the price of a car was generally about 1/3 that of one's annual salary. I was earning a whopping $10,000 in '68, and purchased a new Mustang for $3,200. That was about the same as a TOTL Ford 4-door sedan and was slightly more than 1/3 that of my salary.

    In the late 90's, when my income was over six figures, a pretty decent new car could be had for around $32,000.

    A Marantz 18 receiver in '68 cost $695, and was, at least in my opinion, the best available anywhere at the time. I haven't shopped for receivers for ages, but using the same analogy with salaries and car prices being 10 times what they were then, I believe it's certainly fair to state that one can get a helluva good piece of audio gear today for $6,950.
  • 12-26-2007, 07:52 AM
    markw
    Spoken like a true elitist.
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by melvin walker
    $1000 was not that hard to come by in 1970.

    http://kclibrary.nhmccd.edu/decade70.htmlThe average annual income in 1970 was around $7500 and you're suggesting that 13% of that was "not hard to come by"?

    Maybe a few privileged ones didn't have a problem with that, but many that were still in school and/or had families to raise might not have been.

    But hey, let 'em eat cake, right?
  • 12-26-2007, 07:54 AM
    Mr Peabody
    Hi Fi Fo Fum is still around but don't carry Snell anymore. They are the Mac dealer, picked up Anthem and Paradigm. I think their bread and butter is home theater and car audio. I haven't been there in awhile, the last time I was there they only had a small showing of Mac.

    Best Sound is still here but I think they are struggling. They have ARC, Classe, Rotel, Denon and B&W.

    The Sound Room picked up Rotel and B&W as well. It seems like everyone has Denon. The Sound Room does Lexicon. They aren't really high end, they just have an advertising budget and located in the area where the money is at. They supposedly have Levinson but I don't think really stock much. The story is a customer came in with money and only wanted Levinson and they picked up the line to make the sale. MFP tried to show the same customer Krell but they were hard core Levinson and wasn't about to switch. MFP wasn't going to pick up another line for one sale.

    The engineer and owner of Clayton Audio is still in the area. I wanted to check out some of his gear way back when I was searching for some high end gear but it was just too expensive. MFP usually keeps one of his systems on hand. They don't do much with Linn anymore and dropped Merridian. Other than Krell they now carry T+A, Arcam, and NAD. They also carry Marantz receivers for the budget HT set up. They carry about every series of Dynaudio and recently brought in FoCal. They were carrying Acoustic Energy for quality budget but I'm not sure what they do in that price now.
  • 12-26-2007, 08:01 AM
    Mr Peabody
    Man, what I could do to an audio system with a 6 figure income.
  • 12-26-2007, 08:24 AM
    GMichael
    There is no "line" between mid level and hi end. It's more of a fuzzy grey area that switches back and forth depending on who you are, what you can afford and what means the most to you. Sorry if this answer doesn't help much, but it's the the closest one to being correct.
    There are some very nice receivers out there for around $500 IMO.
    There are others out there who wouldn't see any receiver out there as hi end, even if it cost $5k. You'll have to make up your own mind as to who is right.
  • 12-26-2007, 08:37 AM
    melvin walker
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by E-Stat
    True, but companies like Audio Research and Mark Levinson raised the bar in the quality of the components used (and ultimately, the sound quality). They were among the first to use polyprop caps, glass epoxy boards, etc.


    I look at this positive side. Entry level Honda Civics perform more like 60s exotics. Cornering capability in the 0.85 range and 0-60 in 7 second range can easily be found. While it's true there are some astronomically priced audio components, one can get a great sounding two channel system for $1200.

    rw

    To compare a Honda Civic to a Porsche is no different than comparing a Timex to a Rolex. The Timex may keep better time but that is where the comparison ends. At speeds exceeding 150 miles an hour the Honda , well lets just say they are cars designed for a different market.

    You are correct Audio Research and Mark Levinson set new standards in Amplification.
    When the Audio Research was introduced in the early 70's the price was two to three times greater than the amps they replaced. Workers incomes had not increased two are three times. Hi-end audio became more the equipment of the well heeled not the average
    working man , as did high -end cars.
  • 12-26-2007, 08:56 AM
    melvin walker
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Mr Peabody
    Melvin your statements on Rock & Roll reminds me of this old guy who used to be my neighbor years ago, we'd be in a conversation about something and he'd blame a change or down turn on the Beatles. "Yeah, that all came about when those Beatles came over here". Or, "if it wasn't for those Beatles". :) He was a good guy, it just tickled me that everything was caused by the Beatles. I'd think that a speaker with a 30" woofer and as sensitive as EV probably was would be a Rock-n-Roller's dream. I think if EV was around today with those speakers Klipsch would be hurting if not out of business. The EV gear I've heard from the Pro side was very superior in sound to what Klipsch offers.

    Some of the States prominent manufacturer's aren't even American anymore. Mac was bought by the company who owns Clarion years ago. I don't know if it's still built here or if that company still has them. Levinson was sold to Harmon. I heard that Klipsch was even sold. I'm sure there are others we can add but I can't think of them right now.

    You are right though that there have been several things to change the market and the way gear is marketed and the impression of consumers. The use of the IC chip was huge. Home Theater definitely changing things forever. For speakers it was probably the gravitation of manufacturers to stop using paper cones in favor of new "space age" materials. I'm not sure why they went from larger woofers to a concensus of some kind of 6 1/2" driver configuration. Some how I doubt if it was do to R&R :) That change took me a long time to convert to. I've been told that 6 1/2 drivers are faster and able to give a better bass response. It wasn't until hearing Dynaudio that I was fully convinced this could happen. When selling a product I guess if you want to stay in business you have to change with the times. You will notice though that most "high end" companies are slow to adopt new technology or features until they are fully proven in the market. Hence, no high end name on the front of a Blu-ray or HD-DVD player yet. Some one asked about the 1.3 HDMI, I'm not sure if that's been added to high end processors yet. When you put out a product costing in the thousands rather than hundreds there isn't room for mistakes if you plan to stay in business long. I'm may be bucking change again but I'm not a big fan of the universal player. This is another trend that caught on big. To my knowledge Krell hasn't offered a dedicated CD player since my 280cd was discontinued.

    The early EV Patricians used the licensed Klipsch horns for their enclosures. KV later went to the 30 inch woofer and discontinued the front loaded horn because of the problems in building front loaded horns. Many large KV speakers were kits.

    As for as the old gentleman is concerned there is some merit in what he said. It is very difficult to compare the Beatles to Sinatra or Rogers and Hart. Music has changed it is much louder today than in the Gershwin era. Lyrics are not as important and the melody
    in many of today's music does not exist. How can you hum or whistle today's music ?

    The cost of building an EV Patrician would be prohibitive today , that also includes speakers such as Bozak's Concert Grands etc. I might add the music is so different we listen less today to detail and more to the beat. Jazz is not as popular as it once was that also includes classical music. The earlier speakers were designed for a different type of music.
    A counterpoint.
  • 12-26-2007, 10:54 AM
    frenchmon
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Mr Peabody
    Hi Fi Fo Fum is still around but don't carry Snell anymore. They are the Mac dealer, picked up Anthem and Paradigm. I think their bread and butter is home theater and car audio. I haven't been there in awhile, the last time I was there they only had a small showing of Mac

    I remember they use to do a lots of Alpine back then

    Quote:

    Best Sound is still here but I think they are struggling. They have ARC, Classe, Rotel, Denon and B&W.
    I think I remember them, they where on Lindburg, I think.

    Quote:

    The Sound Room picked up Rotel and B&W as well. It seems like everyone has Denon. The Sound Room does Lexicon. They aren't really high end, they just have an advertising budget and located in the area where the money is at. They supposedly have Levinson but I don't think really stock much. The story is a customer came in with money and only wanted Levinson and they picked up the line to make the sale. MFP tried to show the same customer Krell but they were hard core Levinson and wasn't about to switch. MFP wasn't going to pick up another line for one sale.
    Wow! It cost money to pick up a line of gear. Must have been worth the cost. Denon has the name and reputation now. I though the sound room did Onkyo and Klipsh. Yes you are correct, they are not high end.

    Quote:

    The engineer and owner of Clayton Audio is still in the area. I wanted to check out some of his gear way back when I was searching for some high end gear but it was just too expensive. MFP usually keeps one of his systems on hand. They don't do much with Linn anymore and dropped Merridian. Other than Krell they now carry T+A, Arcam, and NAD. They also carry Marantz receivers for the budget HT set up. They carry about every series of Dynaudio and recently brought in FoCal. They were carrying Acoustic Energy for quality budget but I'm not sure what they do in that price now.
    Kinda sounds like the high end market is drying up around the big STL?

    Thanks for the heads up!

    frenchmon
  • 12-26-2007, 11:44 AM
    melvin walker
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by frenchmon
    I remember they use to do a lots of Alpine back then



    I think I remember them, they where on Lindburg, I think.



    Wow! It cost money to pick up a line of gear. Must have been worth the cost. Denon has the name and reputation now. I though the sound room did Onkyo and Klipsh. Yes you are correct, they are not high end.



    Kinda sounds like the high end market is drying up around the big STL?

    Thanks for the heads up!

    frenchmon

    St.Louis has lost most it's audio high end stores. At one time there was a dozen high end audio stores in the St. Louis metro area. The ones you listed are all new, Most enterning the St.Louis market after 1980.

    Best Sound's owner once was a salesman at High Fi West , Les Marcus.
    Gordon Sound Co's owner was a Bozak rep. Located on Hampton. He was the one who help set up the live vs recorded sound at Powell Symphony Hall.
    Hi-fi- fo Fum is a recent arrival to St.Louis from Milwaukee. Aeolian Piano Co. was the oldest audio high end store in St. Louis. Aeolian featured Bozak ,and Stephens speakers. and was also a Fisher Radio distributor.

    High Fi West was a McIntosh distributor owned by Harvey Bender. Times have changed , not only in St.Louis but through-out the country.
    St.Louis Audio located on Lindbergh and Clayton road was the last really high end audio shop in St.Louis they closed several years ago. They sold Audio Research , Mc.Intosh ,
    Levinson and was the last St.Louis store to sell Bozak speakers.
    -
  • 12-26-2007, 11:47 AM
    FloridaGator7
    Pioneer VSX-517K
    Hey, I recently bought a Pioneer VSX-517K which has a sub pre-out. But my current sub woofer only has the +/- connections. So how can I connect the two, if possible?
  • 12-26-2007, 12:04 PM
    GMichael
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by FloridaGator7
    Hey, I recently bought a Pioneer VSX-517K which has a sub pre-out. But my current sub woofer only has the +/- connections. So how can I connect the two, if possible?

    Welcome to AR,

    You can connect your speaker wires from your receiver to the inputs of the sub. Then connect speaker wires from the output of the sub to your speakers. Be sure to match up all the + & -'s.

    This was an easy question, but it would be better for you to start new threads for anymore questions you have. You just go to the area of interest (speakers in this case) and click on the new threat button. Put in a title and ask away.

    Mike
  • 12-26-2007, 12:42 PM
    snodog
    Well sad to say I don't know how long I can stand this problem with my receiver not producing sound on one of the main speakers so I am going to delay any hope of getting something high end like separate components (I think we defined that) and will just go with a midrange AV theater receiver like originally thought. I don't like the idea of only two channel systems and prefer the 6 channel surround. I will probably get the Onkyo 705 on account of being very current with technology. 7.1 dolby true hd and dts with 1.3 hdmi inputs and such. I wonder if they will be coming out with hd audio cds sometime, maybe they would catch on better now with the hd video flooding the market better than the super audios ever really had the chance to.
  • 12-26-2007, 01:09 PM
    GMichael
    Don't be too sad. I think you're going to like this fine piece of equipment.

    Just because a bunch of nuts who sit around all day talking about audio don't feel that a receiver is "hi-end" for them, doesn't mean that you won't still end up with the nicest stereo on your block. (ramble over)
  • 12-26-2007, 01:56 PM
    snodog
    Lol, thanks. We call them nuts now, someday we too may be reclined in a Lazy boy listening to Nelson's nasally voice singing blue eyes crying in the rain, and sounding so real one can almost smell the soft burning trail of a marijuana cigarette drift hazily by.

    I am not sad, I would love to own a very nice set up lone day ike some of these nice gentlemen have.