• 12-30-2007, 02:39 PM
    Slippers On
    How to convince a newcomer
    I have a 13yr old son who is satisfied with MP3 on his 'phone and sits happily on the computer listening to downloads--to the exclusion of family and all else around him.

    Even though he is exposed to my own systems he seems to find that nothing else matters except mp3 garbage.

    He has no repect for the safe handling of my LPs or CDs so I control his access to them. Now, I know this is a teenager thing but, its got me thinking about how to introduce other people into the world of audiophilia?

    So, I'm hoping you will give input as to how you convinced your children or wives etc. that there is something to be gained by listening to a high quality system.

    I will start the ball rolling by saying that:- "A good system, when you turn the volume up, still allows you to have a conversation!"


    Slippers On
  • 12-30-2007, 02:48 PM
    basite
    nothing like seeing and hearing a Mcintosh somewhere...

    the friendlyness of the dealer does alot too :)

    but seriously, subtle hints to get him listening.

    Do you happen to have (and like) any of the music your son likes on cd or vinyl?
    if so, try connecting his mp3 player (with all the mp3's on it) to your system, and 'invite him' to come have a listen or so. I'd allow him to control the system (don't restrict him too much, but don't let him destroy your system too...), then put on the real album you have too.

    if you don't have any music your son likes too, you'll need to find something you both like. I'd take something he likes, and stay in the same genre...

    if he's into electro and techno and stuff like that, you should definately try Trentemoller (album: The last resort), even my dad likes this, and it's well recorded...

    please, others jump on this, because this could be a big, and interesting thread!!!!!

    Good luck,
    Bert.
  • 12-30-2007, 03:01 PM
    blackraven
    I bought my son and daughter decent starter systems and I let them use my system .. But they get punished if they do not handle my CD's properly and they have to replace any thing that gets ruined. These days its tough to compete with MP3 and iPods do to peer pressure. Kids want what other kids have.

    My kids are finally starting to see the light. My son was complaining the other day about his computer sound, so I bought him a high end sound card so he's starting to appreciate sound quality.
  • 12-30-2007, 03:08 PM
    audio amateur
    I sure wish I had a father that was into this stuff..
  • 12-30-2007, 06:48 PM
    Mr Peabody
    First of all, if you can still have a conversation, then, it isn't TURNED up :)

    I really don't think there is much that will turn some one into an audiophile, either the interest is there or it isn't.

    My oldest daughter now 22 grew up around me having systems. She is intreigged by the turntable but never enough to get one. She loved taking over my car that had a bridged mono 150 watt Precision Power amp pumping a couple Infinity 10" aluminum subs in a sealed enclosure though. She collects a lot of CD's and seems to be broadening her taste but still don't care what kind of system she plays them on. She went with me to the hi fi shop over the weekend and was impressed but still didn't say anything like, "can I get something close to that?" There is hope though she could tell the difference between hearing music on the Dynaudio Sapphires and the NAD HT system. I have a daughter who is 9 with Cerebral Palsy and on the Autism Spectrum, she would sit on my lap as a toddler and listen to music with me. She knows good sound or at least if it doesn't sound right. She uses a portable all the time, some of it is to help with outside noises and some because of her love for music. Because she uses the portable so much I bought her a mp3 player, I know it was a step in the wrong direction but it was practical in this case in a lot of ways. Her room system is a vintage Sansui AU-9500 driving a pair of Dynaudio Audience 40's. I wouldn't have put that type of system in a kids room if it wasn't appreciated.

    If you put your son's favorite song on and crank your Krell monoblocks up to about concert, that is Rock concert, level, and if that don't get him nothing will :) Seriously, though, as in sports, studies or anything, we can't pressure or guide them into what WE want. Most times that will push them away for good. All we can do is expose our kids to experiences and let them choose their path.

    Yeah, NOBODY, touches my music collection. Because NOBODY takes care of it like me, who paid for it and prizes it. If I have something they really like I will make a copy or something for them.
  • 12-30-2007, 06:57 PM
    Rock&Roll Ninja
    I threw away the speakers that came with my daughter's Dell computer and hooked it upto my unused NAD c370 and a pair of PSB Image 1Bs + old RCA subwoofer (most awesome computer setup ever).

    She never asked for the original speakers back.
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Slippers On
    sits happily on the computer listening to downloads--to the exclusion of family and all else around him.

    Yeah, thats normal for teenagers.
  • 12-30-2007, 07:18 PM
    bobsticks
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Rock&Roll Ninja
    I threw away the speakers that came with my daughter's Dell computer and hooked it upto my unused NAD c370 and a pair of PSB Image 1Bs + old RCA subwoofer (most awesome computer setup ever)...

    Amen, brother. I used the same throwing motion and then ran my machine into an Onkyo AV and KEF Q7s, for a nice little mini-system. Haven't heard "computer speakers" that can best it.

    Cheers
  • 12-30-2007, 11:03 PM
    Mr Peabody
    I was batting around the idea of taking my daughter's system out and getting a pair of the Audio Engine 5's. But maybe some creative rearranging of things and just run the computer into a Sansui AUX. I was wanting to simplify and maybe save some room.... the jury is still out.
  • 12-31-2007, 03:10 AM
    pixelthis
    Yeah, you cant force an interest in this stuff, you can just expose the young to high quality sound and hope for the best.
    Beleive it or not its acutually a good sign that your kid listens to MP3, TRY to steer him to files with a higher bitrate. The main thing is hes' listening to music.
    And one day he'll want better (maybe).
    Its sad but true that for most mainstream crap is fine, they think BOSE is high end.
    But I have seen vast improvement in mainstream gear too. A rising tide raises all boats.
    All you can do is demonstrate a good system, be there to answer questions, and take ANY kind of music listening as a good sign:1:
  • 12-31-2007, 03:30 AM
    Bernd
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by pixelthis
    Yeah, you cant force an interest in this stuff, you can just expose the young to high quality sound and hope for the best.
    Beleive it or not its acutually a good sign that your kid listens to MP3, TRY to steer him to files with a higher bitrate. The main thing is hes' listening to music.
    :1:

    Good post and you took the words right off my keyboard. Our youngest (18 now) has been exposed most of his life to decent musical reproduction, but still listens mainly to his i-pod and through the pc. However his musical horizon is open to all sorts of different styles and he does appreciate a decent rig. And I am sure in the future he will have a good quality system.
    I think the important thing is to wet the musical appetite with good recorded music and not to try and force the issue and to be alert if any interest is shown.

    Peace

    :16:
  • 12-31-2007, 05:32 AM
    Feanor
    You can lead a horse to water ...
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Slippers On
    I have a 13yr old son who is satisfied with MP3 on his 'phone and sits happily on the computer listening to downloads--to the exclusion of family and all else around him.
    ...

    Slippers On



    ... But you can't make it drink. Some people, including serious music lovers, never develop a taste for true high-fidelity. I often visit a classical music listener site, (link below): very few there are audiophiles, and few have more than entry level systems. While most buy on CD, (that's the nature of classical music availability), but quite a few are quite content with downloads, at least to sample music before buying the composition on CD. (Do they mention LPs? Never: to them, vinyl isn't relevant to classical music appreciation.)
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Slippers On
    ...

    I will start the ball rolling by saying that:- "A good system, when you turn the volume up, still allows you to have a conversation!"

    Slippers On

    No!! Or, in any case, if I have the volume up, I want to listen not talk.
    :16:
  • 12-31-2007, 05:49 AM
    Luvin Da Blues
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Feanor
    ...
    No!! Or, in any case, if I have the volume up, I want to listen not talk.
    :16:

    LOL...now if we can get the better half to buy into this.
  • 12-31-2007, 08:07 AM
    E-Stat
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Feanor
    No!![/I][/B] Or, in any case, if I have the volume up, I want to listen not talk.
    :16:

    There is, however, a difficult to describe phenomena I've noted where the highest resolution systems in my experience don't *sound* loud even when they are. Just like you find at a live, unamplified venue.

    rw
  • 12-31-2007, 08:16 AM
    Mr Peabody
    [QUOTE=E-Stat]There is, however, a difficult to describe phenomena I've noted where the highest resolution systems in my experience don't *sound* loud even when they are. Just like you find at a live, unamplified venue.

    Your are right, there have been many times I've listened to music and not realize how loud it was until some one comes in to ask a question and you can't hear what they are saying clearly.
  • 01-01-2008, 05:05 AM
    Slippers On
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Slippers On
    :- "A good system, when you turn the volume up, still allows you to have a conversation!"

    Slippers On

    It should be one of the things an audiophile should seek to achieve with his system. If you've got it right, (including having your room treated), you should be able to talk, should you wish, whilst the track is playing a higher volume levels. This is a good sign that your efforts are in the right direction

    Slippers On
  • 01-01-2008, 06:47 AM
    Modernaire
    My advice, get him a guitar, a piano, lessons, expose him/her to live music, the musicians that make the music, a book or two on the history of music, maybe a DVD, etc.

    Musicianship can very much be the starting point of a kids road to audiophile ways. Perhaps the key is teaching kids, guiding them to LOVE and respect music.

    Also consider exposing them to the pleasure of listening to music with higher end setups. Start maybe playing the music he's playing on your system! That might also work.
  • 01-01-2008, 07:14 AM
    Feanor
    True enough
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by E-Stat
    There is, however, a difficult to describe phenomena I've noted where the highest resolution systems in my experience don't *sound* loud even when they are. Just like you find at a live, unamplified venue.

    rw

    What you say is perfectly true and I agree. But of course, I stick with the fact that I turn the system down, not up, if I want to converse.

    Perhaps I have an abnormal dislike for loud ambience. For example, I hate loud parties, noisy restaurants and bars, etc.