• 04-17-2007, 08:41 PM
    bobbybob1
    Has Technology Improved That Much?
    First post, Hello all. I listen to my music through Snell Type E 2's from 1986 and a
    Luxman Integrated Amp (55 wpc) from 1982. It sounds good to me, but if I upgrade
    to an NAD, Rotel or Cambridge Audio Amp with similar power will things sound all
    that different? Thanks for the help
  • 04-18-2007, 12:24 AM
    Dusty Chalk
    Maybe -- only way is to hear for yourself.

    If I can give you the smallest recommendation -- make sure it's an upgrade before parting with your older gear.
  • 04-18-2007, 08:03 AM
    JohnMichael
    Dusty makes an important point. Make sure it is an upgrade. First off I like my Cambridge Audio int. amp. I also remember Luxman as being a quality brand above the budget sector. If the amp is working correctly I do not know if there would be any improvement choosing a budget component at the same wattage. My CA 640A was an improvement over my nine year old Rotel but I do not know if it was still performing at original specs. I have always liked the Snell E 2's and it is easier to listen to speakers and hear if there is anything better in your price range. You do not mention your source but if you have an older cd player you might be surprised by the advances in performance.

    Good luck in your search and welcome to AudioReview!
  • 04-18-2007, 01:32 PM
    Mr Peabody
    I agree with what's been said so far, Luxman and Snell are both better than average gear and nothing negative against NAD or Cambridge, but I doubt if they will improve on what you have. CD playback has improved by leaps and bounds though and that might be a place to look if your player is old.

    Happy to have you with us.
  • 04-19-2007, 11:38 AM
    basite
    indeed, some technology has drastically improved, this being the digital part, and some materials, mostly for speakers.

    other technology has been evolved too, but different, alot of vintage stuff beats modern stuff twice it's price (or more). The only thing that can (and will, after a long while) happen is that the caps dry out, but they can be replaced. You'd be amazed how your vintage amp sounds compared to modern moderately priced mid-fi stuff, not that it will beat a modern super amp or so, but it can still be very good.

    Keep them spinning,
    Bert.
  • 04-19-2007, 01:11 PM
    Dusty Chalk
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by JohnMichael
    You do not mention your source but if you have an older cd player you might be surprised by the advances in performance.

    Good point.
  • 04-20-2007, 05:13 AM
    hermanv
    I think there have been significant advances at the two extreme ends of the music reproduction chain. CD players and speakers. (Turntable/cartridges are better too, but geez, the prices)

    One problem is the bean counter mentality. Some companies use these advances to create the same sound for a lot less money ($29 CD players). Whereas others use these advances to make better sounding stuff. Due largely to inflation it seems that the better equipment has gotten ridiculously overpriced, but a good tube set used to cost $250 in the sixties, that same price would be closer to $2,500 in todays dollar's. While this won't buy the best (neither would $250 in 1965) it will get you a decent product if you avoid those with excessive bells and whistles.

    For a budget, I'd first look at a better CD or buy a used DAC, more bang per buck if your existing player has a digital out jack. Good sounding CD (IMHO) start at near $1,000. Decent used DACs can be had for $250, but spending a little more is better.

    It all depends on the importance of listening to music in your life. If you're a background kind of person leave it alone, your stuff is fine.