• 05-09-2006, 06:36 AM
    JeffKnob
    Could my surge protector be causing damage?
    I have a few clues to think that but I am not sure. My receiver has randomly shut itself off (only once though). My TV had trouble turning on for a while and then just quit. It would not turn on anymore and I tried different outlets. That TV was only 2.5 years old. It was a 32" CRT. My new TV (model listed in the signature) has been resetting the color settings back to the factory default once in a while.

    I am thinking that even if it isn't the surge protector, there is something wrong with the power. When the CRT TV would get plugged in it used to make a noise (I am thinking it was charging up the capacitors or something like that). Could the fluctuation in voltage/power/current cause that to happen once in a while and cause a premature death of the TV?

    If this is the case are there any suggestions? I would rather not have to spend hundreds of dollars on one of those Monster power centers. Are there any other units that would work that aren't overpriced like Monster's stuff?
  • 05-09-2006, 06:41 AM
    superpanavision70mm
    Absolutely. I highly recommend the Belkin Pure AV units. While they list for about $500-$750 you can typically find them online for $200. I have two of the units and I love them...they work perfectly fine and really are comparable with the Monster overpriced stuff. Not only that, but they also have a unit that does battery backup, which might be helpful as well in keeping all your settings and such. I would go with the Belkin Pure AV PF40 or PF 60. They both have 13 inputs and I can answer more questions if you have any.
  • 05-09-2006, 06:56 AM
    noddin0ff
    I really doubt a surge protector would be causing a problem. They just smooth out dips and spikes. Maybe your area has frequent brown outs? A small investment in a simple multimeter will tell you if your outlets are of the right voltage/current and if they are properly grounded. Do you have other major appliances on the same circuit?
  • 05-09-2006, 07:17 AM
    JeffKnob
    Hey Super: That is a little more than I wanted to spend at this point so I think I will just keep my eyes open for those units on ebay or something like that.

    NoddinOff: Besides some incandescent lights, the home theater is the only thing on this circuit. Could a dedicated voltage regulator added before the surge protector help with the brownouts or would only a UPS be able to help with that?

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by noddin0ff
    I really doubt a surge protector would be causing a problem. They just smooth out dips and spikes. Maybe your area has frequent brown outs? A small investment in a simple multimeter will tell you if your outlets are of the right voltage/current and if they are properly grounded. Do you have other major appliances on the same circuit?

  • 05-09-2006, 07:34 AM
    HAVIC
    JeffKnob, how old is your surge protector? Standard every day surge protectors will lose their ability to protect surges after awhile. It is hard to say when but any surge protector the has a joules rating will eventually fail. It may not be a surge problem that you are having but if your surge protector is over a year old replace it anyway. Look into serial mode surge protectors they will virtually last forever. Or get a MOV surge suppresor that is rated over 3000 Joules for this one will last a much longer than one rated for 750 joules.

    Also most surge protectors have a little light on them to show you if your wiring is properly grounded. I'm no elecetrician and not sure how reliable they are but check that out as well. A multimeter like noddin0ff recommends is a great inexpensive purchase as well to check out your electricity/wiring.
  • 05-09-2006, 07:38 AM
    superpanavision70mm
    Well, there is also another PureAv model that is about $100 that I have seen on eBay and such. I think that should suit you fine. Although I am not suggesting that you are having problems now because of your surge protector, but rather offering this as a possibility. I honestly couldn't say one way or another what your issue is now because it could be so many factors.
  • 05-09-2006, 08:19 AM
    JeffKnob
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by HAVIC
    JeffKnob, how old is your surge protector? Standard every day surge protectors will lose their ability to protect surges after awhile. It is hard to say when but any surge protector the has a joules rating will eventually fail. It may not be a surge problem that you are having but if your surge protector is over a year old replace it anyway. Look into serial mode surge protectors they will virtually last forever. Or get a MOV surge suppresor that is rated over 3000 Joules for this one will last a much longer than one rated for 750 joules.

    Also most surge protectors have a little light on them to show you if your wiring is properly grounded. I'm no elecetrician and not sure how reliable they are but check that out as well. A multimeter like noddin0ff recommends is a great inexpensive purchase as well to check out your electricity/wiring.

    I have an AR surge protector that was about $40-$60 and I got it about 3 years ago. I guess that isn't probably doing anything at this point anymore.
  • 05-09-2006, 08:49 AM
    Fergymunster
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by JeffKnob
    I have a few clues to think that but I am not sure. My receiver has randomly shut itself off (only once though). My TV had trouble turning on for a while and then just quit. It would not turn on anymore and I tried different outlets. That TV was only 2.5 years old. It was a 32" CRT. My new TV (model listed in the signature) has been resetting the color settings back to the factory default once in a while.

    I am thinking that even if it isn't the surge protector, there is something wrong with the power. When the CRT TV would get plugged in it used to make a noise (I am thinking it was charging up the capacitors or something like that). Could the fluctuation in voltage/power/current cause that to happen once in a while and cause a premature death of the TV?

    If this is the case are there any suggestions? I would rather not have to spend hundreds of dollars on one of those Monster power centers. Are there any other units that would work that aren't overpriced like Monster's stuff?

    Monster Home Theater powerbar 1100,look up.Got stage 2 cleaning power too.8 outlets etc...
  • 05-09-2006, 09:11 AM
    Glen B
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by JeffKnob
    Hey Super: That is a little more than I wanted to spend at this point so I think I will just keep my eyes open for those units on ebay or something like that.

    NoddinOff: Besides some incandescent lights, the home theater is the only thing on this circuit. Could a dedicated voltage regulator added before the surge protector help with the brownouts or would only a UPS be able to help with that?

    A decent surge protector to protect your equipment costs too much ? What about the replacement cost of your fried equipment ? Furman has affordable line conditioners. Check out the features/specs on this one at $130 with free shipping: http://www.samedaymusic.com/product--FURPL8II
  • 05-09-2006, 09:19 AM
    JeffKnob
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Glen B
    A decent surge protector to protect your equipment costs too much ? What about the replacement cost of your fried equipment ?

    It has to do with the fact that I don't have much in available funds right now. I understand the importance.
  • 05-09-2006, 09:40 AM
    Glen B
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by JeffKnob
    It has to do with the fact that I don't have much in available funds right now. I understand the importance.

    I understand your predicament but my point was that in the long run, a proper surge protector would be more cost-effective. I plug random devices around my home into these single-outlet Radio Shack surge protectors ($12.49): http://www.radioshack.com/product/in...entPage=search This is as cheap as it gets and power cuts out when the surge protection is gone.
  • 05-09-2006, 10:09 AM
    noddin0ff
    Disclaimer: I'm no electrician either. I have a multimeter. If I read the manual carefully I can stick it in an outlet and take measurements. That's it. I use it to make sure the power is really really off before I replace light switches.

    My intuition says that you are not having power surges. If your gear was shutting off due to a power surge, that would indicate to me that your gear has built in surge protection. Does it? You should have a surge protector, but I personally think you don't need to invest more than $20 for a good powerstrip. I think the source of power surges is generally just lightning striking the power lines. I think you'd notice that correlation.

    My intuition says it's more likely, that IF power is the problem, it is more likely due to power drop outs. Either brown outs, loose wiring (inside the unit, in the outlet, or in the power cord), or insuffient power for the circuit (old house, microwave oven on same circuit). If it's brown outs, a call to the electric company is in order.

    An alternative possibility is that your gear is just getting too hot and shutting down. The other alternative is that your TV is failing, and you had an isolated random receiver shut down that was completely unrelated...and that there's nothing wrong with your power.
  • 05-09-2006, 11:35 AM
    Fergymunster
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by JeffKnob
    It has to do with the fact that I don't have much in available funds right now. I understand the importance.

    From what I understand you have a 50" HDTV and your using a $40-$60 surge protecter.That to me seems insane.I'm also assuming some of the problems you have might be related to your standered wall outlet.There are now surge protecters with clean power curcuitry which in most cases would solve all your problems you described.As I said before look up the Monster home theater powerbar 1100 as I've owned it for several years and could'nt be happier.Unless of course you to lazy to look it up.IT won awards in 2002.
  • 05-09-2006, 12:28 PM
    JeffKnob
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Fergymunster
    From what I understand you have a 50" HDTV and your using a $40-$60 surge protecter.That to me seems insane.I'm also assuming some of the problems you have might be related to your standered wall outlet.There are now surge protecters with clean power curcuitry which in most cases would solve all your problems you described.As I said before look up the Monster home theater powerbar 1100 as I've owned it for several years and could'nt be happier.Unless of course you to lazy to look it up.IT won awards in 2002.

    That was COMPLETELY uncalled for.
  • 05-10-2006, 06:36 AM
    Fergymunster
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by JeffKnob
    That was COMPLETELY uncalled for.

    Instead of telling me this quote tell me your problem in more depth.I'm seriuos and genuinely trying to help you.Look if it matters I've seen and heard of people doing stupider things.
  • 05-10-2006, 06:47 AM
    noddin0ff
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Fergymunster
    Instead of telling me this quote tell me your problem in more depth.I'm seriuos and genuinely trying to help you.Look if it matters I've seen and heard of people doing stupider things.

    If you'd make a genuine and serious effort to read the posts more carefully, you'd see that the source of the problem has not been identified, and that nothing 'stupid' or 'insane' or 'lazy' has been done by anybody.
  • 05-10-2006, 07:47 AM
    JeffKnob
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Fergymunster
    Instead of telling me this quote tell me your problem in more depth.I'm seriuos and genuinely trying to help you.Look if it matters I've seen and heard of people doing stupider things.

    Some of the instances may not even be related. I am tight right now for money because I unexpectantly had to replace my TV. Instead of buying some cheap TV as a temporary replacement until I would be purchasing an HDTV a year from now, I purchased the HDTV now. I am concerned that my old TV died after only 2.5 years and my new TV will sometimes reset it's settings back to factory defaults on it's own. Maybe it has nothing to do with the surge protector but that is just my first guess. I am hesitant to purchase an expensive surge propector or power conditioner at this point because I read so many mixed messages. Some people say they are great and some people say they are a waste. I read that some people plug their receivers and amps directly into the wall.

    I live in an apartment that was built about 3-4 years ago so the wiring is new (still could be problems but is less likely). The only time I ever see the lights dim is when my receiver turns on and when I would turn on my old TV (32" CRT). I am no electrician but could the draw of power by the receiver when it is turning on cause a problem with the TV if it is on?

    Also before my old TV died there were many times that I had problems getting the TV to turn on. I thought that my remote just wasn't working well.

    Another point, I unplug everything before every thunderstorm.
  • 05-10-2006, 09:47 AM
    Glen B
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by JeffKnob
    I am hesitant to purchase an expensive surge propector or power conditioner at this point because I read so many mixed messages. Some people say they are great and some people say they are a waste. I read that some people plug their receivers and amps directly into the wall.

    You are confused about "what people say." The opposing opinions have to do with line conditioning (filtration) and whether or not it provides any improvement in sound performance (a subjective matter). This is a separate issue from surge/spike/brownout protection for one's equipment which is a geniune problem.


    Quote:

    Originally Posted by JeffKnob
    I am no electrician but could the draw of power by the receiver when it is turning on cause a problem with the TV if it is on?

    IMO, a receiver not really. An air conditioner or similar appliance on the same circuit is more likely to produce a brownout type effect.


    Quote:

    Originally Posted by JeffKnob
    Also before my old TV died there were many times that I had problems getting the TV to turn on. I thought that my remote just wasn't working well.

    Could have been anything. In my experience dying batteries in a remote can cause similar symptoms. I've lost count of how many times over the years that I thought the VCR or cable was on the blink, only to discover that it was the batteries in the remote that needed replacing.
  • 05-10-2006, 10:31 AM
    JeffKnob
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Glen B
    Could have been anything. In my experience dying batteries in a remote can cause similar symptoms. I've lost count of how many times over the years that I thought the VCR or cable was on the blink, only to discover that it was the batteries in the remote that needed replacing.

    I wish that was it. I tried the original remote, my receiver remote, and the button on the TV. I also tried a different outlet. Normally the TV make a noise when it is first plugged in and it not longer does that. Something inside of it died. They say it isn't worth the money to fix TV's these days. It was a great TV while it lasted.
  • 05-10-2006, 10:41 AM
    Fergymunster
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by JeffKnob
    Some of the instances may not even be related. I am tight right now for money because I unexpectantly had to replace my TV. Instead of buying some cheap TV as a temporary replacement until I would be purchasing an HDTV a year from now, I purchased the HDTV now. I am concerned that my old TV died after only 2.5 years and my new TV will sometimes reset it's settings back to factory defaults on it's own. Maybe it has nothing to do with the surge protector but that is just my first guess. I am hesitant to purchase an expensive surge propector or power conditioner at this point because I read so many mixed messages. Some people say they are great and some people say they are a waste. I read that some people plug their receivers and amps directly into the wall.

    I live in an apartment that was built about 3-4 years ago so the wiring is new (still could be problems but is less likely). The only time I ever see the lights dim is when my receiver turns on and when I would turn on my old TV (32" CRT). I am no electrician but could the draw of power by the receiver when it is turning on cause a problem with the TV if it is on?

    Also before my old TV died there were many times that I had problems getting the TV to turn on. I thought that my remote just wasn't working well.

    Another point, I unplug everything before every thunderstorm.

    Hi Jeffknob,From what I read I really can't diagnosis as to what the problem might be.Also I would like to apologize for calling you "insane" and "lazy".Hope your situation works out.
  • 05-12-2006, 10:59 AM
    JeffKnob
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by noddin0ff
    I really doubt a surge protector would be causing a problem. They just smooth out dips and spikes. Maybe your area has frequent brown outs? A small investment in a simple multimeter will tell you if your outlets are of the right voltage/current and if they are properly grounded. Do you have other major appliances on the same circuit?

    I think this is a good idea. I was doing some more thinking and remembered that I had to replace the power supply on my computer a few months ago. I am guessing the TV going out and the computer power supply dying could very well be caused by a brownout. They are on different circuits in the apartment. I completely understand the idea of using a multimeter but would I just have to stand there to see if there are any fluctuations and hope they even occur while I am doing the testing or is there a way I can just plug something in and it can pay attention to my voltage?

    If it turns out that I am getting brownouts and TV probably died due to that, would that be something simple for someone to fix and therefore inexpensive?