• 10-22-2011, 05:18 PM
    cyberpac9
    Stream music to multiple rooms?
    Just moved and I'm looking at options for streaming music from my pc to multiple rooms. In my old house, pc was in office and had one receiver in living room - attached was an Apple Airport Express. This was no issue, just streamed music to the one receiver.

    Now, in the new house, will have a receiver in family room and receiver in man cave. Looking to stream music from office to both rooms. I guess I could add another AX, but not sure that is the best option.

    Any suggestions?
  • 10-24-2011, 03:26 AM
    noddin0ff
    I won't claim it's the best option, but I'd go with another AX or ATV. If you're using AX then you likely have everything working in iTunes anyway. Why rock the boat?

    However, Squeezebox Touch would likely be the most highly regarded alternative and certainly a step up from AX, especially if you are connecting the device to your system via analog.
  • 10-24-2011, 09:54 AM
    recoveryone
  • 10-25-2011, 05:46 PM
    cyberpac9
    Maybe another AX is the way to go.

    @recoveryone - if I understand that correctly, it streams to the logitech device. I'm looking to stream to my surround sound upstairs and in the man cave.
  • 10-26-2011, 02:53 AM
    noddin0ff
    The Squeezebox (SqB) is analogous to the AX in the streaming chain. Your server would stream to the device (AX or SqB), the device sends the signal to the receiver/pre-amp/DAC. Both SqB and AX can pass the digital signal to a downstream DAC for conversion to analog OR both have an onboard DAC to convert and pass an analog signal to a receiver/pre-amp.

    The SqB is more highly regarded for having a decent onboard DAC. SqB supports FLAC (which iTunes doesn't) and this is a big consideration for many. Generally, SqB is a notable upgrade relative to AX for music handling. The SqB also provides an interface for navigating your music and provides access to internet music services.

    The AX on the other hand, while basically a pass-through for music, is primarily meant to function as part of your wireless network, supports 2.4GHz and 5GHz wireless frequencies, connects to printers, extends your coverage etc. The AX is tied to iTunes. Some don't like being 'forced' to use iTunes. Personally, I have a lot of Apple devices and I like how easily they all integrate, I'm content to use iTunes and AX and ATV. I use the digital optical out on the AX to take the signal to an external DAC, so I don't care about having a quality DAC in the AX.
  • 10-26-2011, 07:57 AM
    recoveryone
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by cyberpac9 View Post
    Maybe another AX is the way to go.

    @recoveryone - if I understand that correctly, it streams to the logitech device. I'm looking to stream to my surround sound upstairs and in the man cave.

    I'm sorry, I thought you had some insight on most of the popular DAR's on the market. But Nodd gave you some good info to go on. I use the older Classic model (3 of them) and they work great. Now they can be buggie if the signal is weak or if your firewall is not set correctly.

    http://t2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:A...GAHY09mdpllDzQ
  • 10-26-2011, 05:47 PM
    cyberpac9
    Oh wow! guess I should've read in more detail about the SqB rather than glancing it over. I may need to look at that again...

    @recoveryone - nope, not up to speed on popular DARs. I got my AX 4 or 5 years ago and haven't looked into this stuff since. If there are others I should be considering, mind sharing? The SqB has piqued my interest now, so I'd like to compare various features to see what fits my needs.
  • 10-27-2011, 07:12 AM
    recoveryone
    Here is a list off Cnet.com to give you a head start on looking and price range



    Best network music players

    • Share
    (Updated August 11, 2011 2:08 AM PDT) http://reviews.cnet.com/i/ff/ae/ed_matthewm_sm.gif Matthew Moskovciak
    Associate editor


    Digital audio is everywhere--from gigabytes of MP3s stored on your computer's hard drive to Internet radio stations and subscription music services. But the challenge has always been to get the music from your computer to the stereo system.

    That's where digital audio streamers come in. Though they're known by a variety of names--including digital audio receivers and digital media adapters--these products let you enjoy a wide range of digital music from your PC or the Internet over the big speakers of your home stereo, even if it's in a different room of the house. All of the options listed below use a home network (Ethernet or Wi-Fi) to transmit music. DRM and copy-protection issues aren't as much of a problem as they used to be, but it's still worth confirming that your prospective player can handle your preferred audio file or subscription service.

    It's also worth pointing out that these systems will be overkill for a lot of users. Now that game consoles like the Xbox 360 and PS3 handle music (and video) streaming with ease, you may not need the extra functionality provided by dedicated network music players. If you're looking for a music streamer with a built-in speaker, check out our best Wi-Fi radios.

    Sonos Play:3 (black) Reviewed on 08/11/2011 The Bottom Line: While it doesn't sound quite as good as the larger Play:5, the Sonos Play:3 delivers a superior streaming-audio experience that you can control from any iOS device or Android smartphone.
    Specs: Network audio player, 10.6 in x 6.3 in x 5.2 in, Network audio player, IEEE 802.3 (Ethernet), IEEE 802.3u (Fast Ethernet), Audible, AAC, WMA, WAV, FLAC, Ogg Vorbis, Apple Lossless, AIFF, MP3, Wireless / wired

    Orb MP-1 Music Player Reviewed on 10/21/2010 The Bottom Line: For the price of $70, we're not sure there's an easier-to-use or more practical device out there that will give you local and mobile access to your media like the Orb MP-1.
    Specs: Network audio player, 3.3 in x 3.3 in x 0.8 in, Internet radio, Network audio player, IEEE 802.11b (Wi-Fi), IEEE 802.11g, Audible, AAC, WMA, WAV, Apple Lossless, MP3, Wireless

    Sonos ZonePlayer ZP80 The Bottom Line: The ZonePlayer ZP80 expands your Sonos Digital Audio System to another room.
    Specs: Network audio player, 5.4 in x 5.5 in x 2.9 in, Network audio player, IEEE 802.3 (Ethernet), IEEE 802.3u (Fast Ethernet), WMA, WAV, FLAC, Ogg Vorbis, Apple Lossless, AIFF, Audible, AAC, MP3, Wireless / wired

    Tivoli NCHG Audio Networks FM (cherry/gold) Reviewed on 07/12/2008 The Bottom Line: The Tivoli Audio NetWorks boasts impressive sound quality and solid streaming audio, but some shortsighted design issues and an extremely high price tag spoil the package.
    Specs: Network audio player with radio, 5.5 in x 5.1 in x 8.7 in, Radio, Network audio player, IEEE 802.11b (Wi-Fi), IEEE 802.3 (Ethernet), IEEE 802.11g, IEEE 802.3u (Fast Ethernet), WMA, MP3, Wireless / wired

    Philips Streamium WACS700 Wireless Music Center and Station Reviewed on 05/25/2006 The Bottom Line: The stylish Philips Streamium WACS700/37 can stream digital music throughout your home without a PC, but considering its high price, it's hard to overlook some basic feature and performance shortfalls.
    Specs: Network audio player + station, Radio / CD / network audio player/ digital player, Stereo, Network audio player - WMA, PCM, MP3

    Linksys WMLS11B Reviewed on 08/16/2004 The Bottom Line: The Linksys WMLS11B streams your digital music to any room in the house, but you'll want to use your own speakers.
    Specs: Network audio player, 16 in x 8.5 in x 3.4 in, Network audio player, IEEE 802.11b (Wi-Fi), IEEE 802.3 (Ethernet), IEEE 802.3u (Fast Ethernet), WMA, WAV, PCM, MP3, Wireless / wired

    Logitech Squeezebox Touch Specs: Network audio player, Internet radio, Network audio player, IEEE 802.11b (Wi-Fi), IEEE 802.3 (Ethernet), IEEE 802.11g, IEEE 802.3u (Fast Ethernet), WMA, WAV, FLAC, Ogg Vorbis, Apple Lossless, AIFF, AAC, MP3, Wireless / wired

    Logitech Squeezebox Receiver Specs: Network audio player, 6.1 in x 4.4 in x 1.1 in, Network audio player, IEEE 802.11b (Wi-Fi), IEEE 802.3 (Ethernet), IEEE 802.11g, IEEE 802.3u (Fast Ethernet), WMA, WAV, PCM, FLAC, Ogg Vorbis, Apple Lossless, AIFF, MP2, AAC, MP3, Wireless / wired

    Denon ASD-51N Specs: Network audio player, 5.5 in x 4.3 in x 1.6 in, Network audio player, IEEE 802.3 (Ethernet), IEEE 802.3u (Fast Ethernet), WMA, WAV, FLAC, AAC, MP3, Wired

    Sangean WFR-20 Specs: Network audio player, 11.4 in x 8.5 in x 4.5 in, Network audio player, IEEE 802.11b (Wi-Fi), IEEE 802.3 (Ethernet), IEEE 802.11g, IEEE 802.3u (Fast Ethernet), WMA, WAV, FLAC, AIFF, AAC, MP3, Wireless / wired

    Grace Digital Solo Specs: Network audio player, 3.1 in x 6.1 in x 1.4 in, Internet radio, Network audio player, IEEE 802.11b (Wi-Fi), IEEE 802.11g, AAC, WMA, WAV, AIFF, MP3, Wireless
  • 10-28-2011, 06:18 PM
    cyberpac9
    Thanks recoveryone - great info...
  • 10-31-2011, 04:47 AM
    sugarpop233
    We are big music fans and renovating our house right now. We would like to be able to wire the house such that we can just go to our Mac and tell it where to play what. How do we do that?
    Thanks!
  • 10-31-2011, 05:15 AM
    noddin0ff
    Hi Sugarpop,

    The idea behind wireless systems is that you don't have to wire the house to get the signal where you want. However, if you're looking to use one central amp to power speakers through out the house the you want the signal from you Mac to go to the central hub...

    I'm sure with more information about what you are trying to accomplish and with what componenets, you can get good advice here. You might want to start a new thread with a description of what your are trying to do.