CD comparo.

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  • 06-10-2008, 01:49 PM
    gjpham
    CD comparo.
    Hi all,
    1/ If you need a source that is used JUST FOR AUDIO (sound), what would your pick if these sources are in your list? and WHY?
    - Marantz SA-11S1. New: $3,500. Used: $1,500
    - Krell Standard DVD. New: $8,000. Used: $2,000
    - Krell Showcase DVD. New: $4,000. Used: $1,500
    - Rega Apollo: New: $1,200.
    - Rega Saturn. New: $2,600.
    - Bryston BCD-1. New $2,700
    - Vincent CD-S6. New: $1,900
    - Sim Audio CD-1. New: $1,500
    - Cambridge Azur 840C. New: $1,500
    - Music Hall CD-25.2. New: $600

    2/ Denon and Marantz just come out with new BlueRay for $2,000 but will you satisfy with the sound quality if the companies already invest too much in BlueRay device?

    3/ Many units from England so thos from home land please join in.

    While naming all these interesting players, I went upstair and played around with my (nope, borrowed it) Krell Standard DVD, and "holly crap", the loudness between the XLR and the RCA were tranmendously diff. Have y'all tried the XLR connections and compare them back to back with the RCA?
    My next player has to have XLR and that's for sure.
  • 06-10-2008, 09:40 PM
    blackraven
    I'm partial to the 840c since I own it and because I would rather buy new than used. The 840c has a very detailed sound, is upsampling to 384kHz and has XLR and can be used as a DAC. Its been said in some reviews that it is the best sounding CDP under $5K, so its a great CDP if your on a budget and want an audiophile player. If you have a bright sounding system then avoid this CDP and go with a Marantz.

    I also like the Marantz unit. I cant comment on the Krell as I have never listened to them.

    The Music Hall is a great budget player and well worth the $540 I paid for it. It has a very transparent sound with excellent imaging.
  • 06-11-2008, 02:59 AM
    basite
    The rega saturn, or the Marantz SA-11S1
  • 06-11-2008, 06:35 PM
    RGA
    Add the new Audio Note entry level CD player AN CD 1.1x. the entry level is $2,800. My dealer carries several of the ones on your list and this new 1.1x quite easily beats them all. http://www.audionote.co.uk/products/..._1.1x_01.shtml

    The dealer agrees and they carry the Regas, Sim Audio, Bryston, Cambridge, Marantz and Denon's. Krell doesn't really compete in my view.

    I like the Sim Audio though and the matching integrated - quite excellent for the money and a 10 year warranty. Not a bad deal at all.
  • 06-11-2008, 11:42 PM
    gjpham
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by RGA
    Add the new Audio Note entry level CD player AN CD 1.1x. the entry level is $2,800. My dealer carries several of the ones on your list and this new 1.1x quite easily beats them all. http://www.audionote.co.uk/products/..._1.1x_01.shtml

    The dealer agrees and they carry the Regas, Sim Audio, Bryston, Cambridge, Marantz and Denon's. Krell doesn't really compete in my view.

    I like the Sim Audio though and the matching integrated - quite excellent for the money and a 10 year warranty. Not a bad deal at all.

    Isn't Krell popular in England?
    I don't acknowledge the brand that you prefered. Its exterior looks nice and well made but the inside is kind of mom and pop made to me. But big Caps like those probably would provide a smooth sound though. Don't get me wrong, I normally do not under estimate (or over estimate)any thing until I hear it. Thanks,
  • 06-11-2008, 11:54 PM
    gjpham
    I have talked to 1 individual to see which players perform better then others and it seems that how it ranks up on the chart pretty much on how much they cost. Interesting huh? well, if we base on that then this is how I rank them up on performance category, any objections?

    - Krell Standard DVD.........New: $8,000. Used: $2,000
    - Krell Showcase DVD.......New: $4,000. Used: $1,300
    - Marantz SA-11S1............New: $3,500. Used: $1,500
    - Bryston BCD-1................New $2,700
    - Rega Saturn....................New: $2,600.
    - Vincent CD-S6................New: $1,900
    - Sim Audio CD-1...............New: $1,500
    - Cambridge Azur 840C......New: $1,500
    - Rega Apollo....................New: $1,200.
    - Music Hall CD-25.2..........New: $600

    Well, I know this is wrong of doing but it is pretty much it. Otherwise, I don't see how the Music Hall can out perform the most expensive on this chart, Krell.
  • 06-12-2008, 06:40 AM
    Feanor
    XLR / balanced
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by gjpham
    ...

    While naming all these interesting players, I went upstair and played around with my (nope, borrowed it) Krell Standard DVD, and "holly crap", the loudness between the XLR and the RCA were tranmendously diff. Have y'all tried the XLR connections and compare them back to back with the RCA?
    My next player has to have XLR and that's for sure.

    When a component outputs a balanced signal and sends it to a downstream component that has true, fully balanced circuitry, you will have a 6dB boost in volume with the same gain setting.

    But note that if a component has XLR outputs, they aren't necessarily sending a balanced signal. Nor is a downstream component with XLR inputs necessarily balanced. For an internally single-end component to send or receive a truly balance signal, additional circuitry is required, hence balanced is not always better.

    Bottom line is:
    • Fully balance source to fully balanced downstream = 6dB additional gain, best noise rejection by the interconnects over long runs, and usually best performance.
    • Fully balance source to internally single-end downstream = no additional gain but better noise rejection. Sound quality is likely to be no better because the downstream has additional circuitry.
    • Internally single-ended source with balance output to fully balanced downstream = 6dB additional gain, better noise rejection, but probably no sonic advantage because the source has additional circuitry.
    • Internally single-ended source with balance output to internally single-end downstream = no additional gain but better noise rejection. Sonic performance is usually degraded because of additional ciruitry in both the source and downstream.
    • Internally single-ended component outputing a single-ended signal via XLR = no extra gain, no extra noise reduction, and likely an inferior signal if the downstream is internally single-ended because the signal will still go through the balanced -to- single-end circuitry.
  • 06-12-2008, 07:43 AM
    gjpham
    Feanor, thanks mate.
    I was gonna post an update about the loudness and the sound quality from the XLR that I have experience here. Your reply shows that you have experienced with it, that's pretty cool because now I know who to bother...
    I have found myself that the sonic from the XLR was tranmendously increased but as for sound quality, hummm, it was kinda harsh. I, somewhat, did not really like it or feel it. It was kind of dry, sweetless, and non musical. It was "In your face" kind of type... so bright that listeners tend to step back and tilt away. Lots of details though so if people favor it for best connection, it is probably agree-able.
    Yup, +6db increased in volume is about right.
  • 06-12-2008, 06:19 PM
    RGA
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by gjpham
    Isn't Krell popular in England?
    I don't acknowledge the brand that you prefered. Its exterior looks nice and well made but the inside is kind of mom and pop made to me. But big Caps like those probably would provide a smooth sound though. Don't get me wrong, I normally do not under estimate (or over estimate)any thing until I hear it. Thanks,

    It may look Mom and Pop but you'd be mistaken. They have some of the best engineers working in the business. You'll notice of all the CD players you're looking at the one that looks the simplest is the Audio Note. There is less junk in the box that gets in the way of the sound and generally far better parts.

    Audio Note's player is a no times oversampling, no error correction, no jitter reduction, no digital filters, no analog filter, no noise shaping design. It is a direct from disc design - the theory being if you don't make mistakes in the first place you should not need to fix them after the fact. Several other companies have started copying this approach but it demands more expense. A company you may be more familiar with is Sonic Frontiers who used to be at the forefront of digital technology before becoming Anthem and getting bought out. The top designer there were hired by Audio Note to get this technology up and running. Their DACs are considered to be one of the handful best in the business. The others are not on your list.

    The Audio Note CD player is also upgradeable unlike most others and if money is an issue you can also build kits.

    This will give you an idea as to the design - this reviewer had some very good cd replay machines and has since bought the player and became a dealer for them. http://www.positive-feedback.com/Issue8/audionote.htm